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Rusty Flat Skillet in need of a refurb...??

Discussion in 'The Homestead' started by Greg, Aug 5, 2017.

  1. Greg

    Greg Full Member

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    Hello All
    Looking at possibly getting hold of a cast iron flat skillet from my local antiques shop..but it's very rusty.
    My question is can it be refurbished to a standard where I can using it for baking on?
    Any advice or help would be appreciated.
    Thanks
    Greg
     
  2. Stew

    Stew Bushcrafter through and through

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    Rust will come off in a number of ways my current favourite is a soak in molasses mixed with water - it's called chelating and just eats the rust. A slow process but good.
     
  3. JohnC

    JohnC Full Member

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  4. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    Brillo pad (probably several) hot water and elbow grease. Then scrub it clean in hot water and fairy liquid. Rinse until you can wipe it dry with paper towels and there's no staining.
    The bottom doesn't need to be as perfect though; all my old cast iron pots and girdles are pitted underneath, but they cook superbly.

    To be honest I can't be bothered faffing around seasoning them; I just fry in/on them for a bit and wipe them clean every time and with a fresh wipe of oil. I just use sunflower. Olive goes thick and sticky, and I don't eat meat so I won't use dripping on them and I'm not a fan of the hydrogenated stuffs.
    The girdles/bakestones I leave on top of the cooker and they are slid over the switched off rings when I've finished cooking. It seasons them fine, and no stinking black smoke in the house.
    Use them, make pancakes, scones, oatcakes, naan, on the flat ones, within a couple of weeks of use they'll be pretty much perfect.

    I know, I'm a housewife :eek: and most of you lot are 'men with tools' :D I like a simple life :D

    M
     
  5. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    xxxxxxxxxxxxx
     
    #5 Janne, Aug 5, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2017
  6. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Sand blaster. Or burn it off.
     
  7. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    It's an electric one with the cast flat rings. A bit like this but mine has extra fast heat rings.
    http://www.shipitappliances.com/hob...MIvpHH-OfA1QIVBLXtCh2tbANuEAQYAiABEgLww_D_BwE

    I had to buy a new girdle because the old ones were too big for it :sigh:
    I ended up with one of these
    https://www.johnlewis.com/kitchen-c...VTr7tCh0DlghNEAQYASABEgKRQ_D_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

    It's been surprisingly good for a piece of modern casting.

    I've been eyeing up an induction hob, but I'm swithering.

    M
     
  8. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Best to ask Tombear of this parish. He has bought and revived more rusty carboot specials that maybe all others combined.
    His before and after pictures are amazing = yes, it can be done well.
     
  9. Keith_Beef

    Keith_Beef Native

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    I used a round wire brush in the chuck of a drill to get off the worst of it. Then heated on a fire or on the gas hob while the kettle is coming up to the boil. Rinsed with hot water from the kettle and set back on the heat to dry it and finally a big handful of the coarsest sea salt I have, rubbed around with a very very thick wad of kitchen roll. At this point, the iron and salt are hot enough to just scorch the paper, so long sleeves, gloves and eye-protection are advisable.

    Another rinse with boiling water, back on the heat and then when the iron is dry a bit of oil to start seasoning… From a really manky and rusty pot to usable in less than an hour.
     
  10. Greg

    Greg Full Member

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    Thanks for the replies...I'll go spend the £8 on it tomorrow and bring it back to life in one way or another :You_Rock_
     
  11. mr dazzler

    mr dazzler Native

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    If you use citric acid it will remove rust, but also eat the sound metal quite fast, and smell like a veggies fart. It will work (I used it quite a bit on tool refurbing at one time but consider electolysis removal method far better, much gentler and not destructive) If you do try it, make sure you have some strong alkali like bleach to neutralise the acid or else it will start to rust again in minutes, even if you think you rinsed it thoroughly
     
  12. Monikieman

    Monikieman Full Member

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    If it's years of crud a self cleaning oven with pyro works a treat. A brillo pad works a treat after that.

    tried blow torch/brushes on drills but pyro oven is so easy (if you have one that is).
     
  13. Tonyuk

    Tonyuk Settler

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    I used a wire brush on a drill to get the majority of the rust off then finished with a brillo pad. I season all my iron and steel pans with lard, after cooking they get a wipe with plain veg oil. Works very well but i only relay use them for steak or other meat and for cooking over the fire.

    Tonyuk
     
  14. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    #14 Janne, Aug 11, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2017
  15. Monikieman

    Monikieman Full Member

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    I'm trying to picture rusty teeth:)
     
  16. Hunkyfunkster

    Hunkyfunkster Full Member

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    A good long soak in some vinegar and the rust will come off easy
     
  17. dwardo

    dwardo Maker

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    Burn it, oil it, scrape it. Then repeat. Most of our Iron-wear lives in the woods hanging from trees. :)
     

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