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Hoard of Iron Age gold coins found in East Anglia

Discussion in 'Other Chatter' started by gregorach, Jan 20, 2009.

  1. gregorach

    gregorach Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I know many of us here are interested in archaeology, so I thought this was worth posting:

    Boudicca's gold hoard unearthed

    [Not actually Boudicca's at all, but never mind...]

     
  2. Oblio13

    Oblio13 Settler

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    I wonder how many things like this are found that never make the news.
     
  3. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    Too many :soapbox:

    Good on whoever reported this site and hoard, if it's in total context it's a wonderful find indeed. :approve:

    cheers,
    Toddy
     
  4. Shewie

    Shewie Mod
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    How big are those staters ? They only look about 2" in diameter on that picture, but it says they weigh as much as 5 bags of sugar each :eek:
     
  5. gregorach

    gregorach Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    No it doesn't. It says 5g each, not 5kg. That's about a rounded teaspoon of sugar.
     
  6. Shewie

    Shewie Mod
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    :twak:

    I`ll get me coat


    Must need more caffeine
     
  7. locum76

    locum76 Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    who does the gold belong to then? the finder, the landowner or the state?
     
  8. Long Stride

    Long Stride Tenderfoot

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    In Scotland it belongs to the State.

    www.treasuretrovescotland.co.uk/

    If they do not want it they will return it to the finder.
    If they do want to keep it I think you get a finders fee.

    I think in England + Wales it is a bit more complicated.

    Long Stride
     
  9. Mesquite

    Mesquite Anyone for sailing?

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    If it's in England then like Scotland it belongs to the State providing they wish to keep it. If they do then the finder and landowner are given the full market value, if not then it's returned to them and they can dispose of it as they see fit.

    There's a bit more to it based on percentages of gold and silver in the hoard, if it's more or less than 300 years old, if it was obivously hidden with intent to be recovered. If you want to read more about it then here's the Treasure trove act

    I used to do metal detecting and like Toddy says there's a lot that's found that isn't declared due to nighthawkers going in and robbing sites. As always there's a big black market for ancient artifacts and so long as people don't care where things come from and are willing to pay money there will be this trade :(

    Out of curiousity are there any other metal detectorists, past or present here?
     
  10. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    Good metal detectorists are brilliant to work with.
    Knowlegeable, interested, prepared to do the research to know their area, and prepared to stop and think about what they're doing when necessary. Then up for finding the relevant county archaeologist and reporting something of interest.

    It's the few who rob out, literally loot, the metals from a site, and in doing so remove context, provenace, and trash the stratigraphy that is used to interpret associative evidences, who give the majority a bad rep.

    A good, genuinely enthusiastic and motivated amateur will beat a professional who is just working for a living nine times out of ten.

    What some folks forget is that it is 'our' , collectively ours that is, cultural heritage, not just a resource to exploit to line their pockets.

    cheers,
    Toddy
     
  11. mr dazzler

    mr dazzler Native

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    Lots of old stuff in the ground gets trashed because the builders simply cant be bothered with the hassle (additional costs and delays) if they find it, and I dont really blame them to be honest. Especially if its someones human remains, what business do a bunch of archeologists have digging it all up any way, they wouldnt do that in a modern grave yard would they; whatever happened to respecting the dead? :)
     
  12. firecrest

    firecrest Full Member

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    It says it was buried as a votive offering to the Gods, but is this accurate? I really know nothing of this kind of history but as it was buried at a time of political turmoil, isn't it likely it was buried for safe keeping? After all, the gold that was buried in egyptian tombs and was subsiquently looted was actually a professional, albeit underhand, process done by officials. The economists really had no intention of burying that amount of wealth.
     
  13. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    The presumption is in favour of preservation in situ, and only when a site is under threat or being developed will it be excavated and recorded. The obvious exception is research. However, it all needs paid for, and developers hate having to pay for proper excavation, recording, and accession .........it eats into their profits they say...........but once the site is destroyed we can't magically restore the knowledge it might have provided that enriches our cultural heritage.

    Why am I preaching to the converted anyway :D

    cheers,
    Toddy
     
  14. firecrest

    firecrest Full Member

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    Unfortunately part of the reason hoards do go unreported is that the finders fee is significantly less than the market value of the object, despite what is claimed.
     
  15. mr dazzler

    mr dazzler Native

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    Of course it eats into their profits..... I cant figure why a developer or builder should be liable for excavation and additional costs any way? What good legitimate reason is there :confused: Just so a few archeologists from some University dept get a bit of work for a week or 2 maybe longer if they are really lucky.....and write a paper that only a few other "pro's" are ever likely to see or even read? And a developer is just that-someone who develops new building projects, they dont usually particularly care about what some iron age blacksmith or roman potter did, (and that doesnt make them philistines or less important than someone who does care:) )
     
  16. gregorach

    gregorach Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    It's possible I suppose, but there is a clear and indisputable tradition of making similar votive offerings which pre-dates the Roman invasion. Of course, it's more-or-less impossible to prove why a particular hoard was buried, but the balance of probabilities seems to favour a votive offering. If it was buried for safe-keeping, you have to wonder why it was never recovered... Sure, it's possible that everyone who knew where it was were killed shortly afterwards, but is it likely? If it had been buried slightly later (say around the Iceni revolt of AD 60) it might be a different matter.

    The tradition of making votive offerings survives to this day - ever thrown a coin into a wishing well? Same thing really.
     
  17. gregorach

    gregorach Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    All investment carries risk. You buy the land, you're responsible for what's on it. If you find a treasure trove, you're entitled to the finders fee. If you find a group of Bronze Age burials, you have to take the hit. Property development isn't a one-way bet.
     
  18. mr dazzler

    mr dazzler Native

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    This is precisely why so many bits and pieces get quietly ignored and left just where they were. No sane businessman wants yet more officials on top of the crowds of existing ones they are compelled to deal with-and fund-under so called normal circumstances. And to have to tolerate pointless delays.
    The sutton hoo type stuff that the public actually do find interesting is rare, and I still really question if any one has any right to dig it up anyway? If the stuff is that important maybe the archeology dept's should fund site dig's, they seem to be the ones that are most passionate about the artifacts :) Its a hard but true fact that not many outside the "industry" really give 2 hoots.
     
  19. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    I think you are gravely mistaken.
    I do know however that the only other source of funding, the govenment, has cut there expenditure on cultural heritage to the bone. The UK pays about 11p per person per year, other nations value their heritage and the average is about £11.
    Therefore it is left to those who wish to use the land to cough up for the work.

    Catch 22.

    And on that note, this is becoming a political post, and I'll stop that topic there.

    Archaeologists have no say in what land the developers choose to use, only that it ought to be properly examined before any evidences are permanently destroyed.

    cheers,
    Toddy
     
  20. Pang

    Pang Forager

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    i bet everyone's gone adn brought out their old metal detectors for their next trip! lol, might even become a standard kit
     

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