Alpkit
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: calorific content of wild foods?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Potton, Bedfordshire or alternatively my own happy little world
    Posts
    9,207

    Default calorific content of wild foods?

    Does anyone know of a resource that lists the calorific content of wild foods?
    i know meat is high calorie and basics but i would be interested to see which foods provide the most calories.
    this is mainly to satisfy my curiosity but it could also come in handy for when i am silly enough to go out with the intent of harvesting the majority of my food as i go
    thanks in advance
    Only the Wilderness is pure truth

    If it ain't Raining then it ain't Training!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    kent
    Posts
    2,645

    Default

    content vs effort would be interesting too...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Potton, Bedfordshire or alternatively my own happy little world
    Posts
    9,207

    Default

    thats my next question although i think it would be influenced greatly by the calorific content to start with
    another one is the processing effort included eg acorns take so long to leech tannins out but cats tails roots take much less but does the content of acorns outweigh the effort taken to process them
    Only the Wilderness is pure truth

    If it ain't Raining then it ain't Training!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    south wales
    Posts
    12,310

    Default

    Very little food value in a lot of 'wild food'. I suspect diet improved a lot with organised farming of hefty root vegetables like spuds, carrots, swede etc. Not much value in shell fish, obviously a lot more in fish. Someone here will have more details I'm sure.

    Forward where the knocks are hardest, some to failure, some to fame;
    Never mind the cheers or hooting, keep your head and play the game





  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Manchester, UK
    Posts
    258

    Default

    The nutritional value of wild foods is very variable.

    It depends on soil type, water content and other factors related to the environment in which the plant is growing, and two apparently identical plants growing within a few metres of each other could be vastly different in nutritional content, for example in plant 'A' is nearer to a watercourse than plant 'B', then the water content of 'A' would be higher than 'B', producing a larger root than 'B', but with the same (or possibly less!) nutritional content.

    In agriculture, plants are grown in an environment which is modified to provide relatively consistent conditions across a whole field, by irrigation, drainage and use of fertilisers, thus producing equally consistent crops. (Look how consistent in size, colour and quality vegetables in your local supermarket are.)

    Th only real discussion I've found on the use of wild foods for effective nutrition is the "Ray Mears Wild Food" DVD and book combination. There are some other sources in scientific papers but they tend to be rather technical.

    Hope this helps.

    Alan
    No man knows true happiness until he's married......but then it's too late!

    Proud member of the Greater Manchester Bushcraft Group

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Potton, Bedfordshire or alternatively my own happy little world
    Posts
    9,207

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rik_uk3 View Post
    Very little food value in a lot of 'wild food'. I suspect diet improved a lot with organised farming of hefty root vegetables like spuds, carrots, swede etc. Not much value in shell fish, obviously a lot more in fish. Someone here will have more details I'm sure.
    i reckoned that myself
    Only the Wilderness is pure truth

    If it ain't Raining then it ain't Training!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Potton, Bedfordshire or alternatively my own happy little world
    Posts
    9,207

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Ratcatcher View Post
    The nutritional value of wild foods is very variable.

    It depends on soil type, water content and other factors related to the environment in which the plant is growing, and two apparently identical plants growing within a few metres of each other could be vastly different in nutritional content, for example in plant 'A' is nearer to a watercourse than plant 'B', then the water content of 'A' would be higher than 'B', producing a larger root than 'B', but with the same (or possibly less!) nutritional content.

    In agriculture, plants are grown in an environment which is modified to provide relatively consistent conditions across a whole field, by irrigation, drainage and use of fertilisers, thus producing equally consistent crops. (Look how consistent in size, colour and quality vegetables in your local supermarket are.)

    Th only real discussion I've found on the use of wild foods for effective nutrition is the "Ray Mears Wild Food" DVD and book combination. There are some other sources in scientific papers but they tend to be rather technical.

    Hope this helps.

    Alan
    Thanks for that
    i figured there would be a dry and dusty technical science paper i suppose i shall have to look into those too
    the wild food series and book are good
    Only the Wilderness is pure truth

    If it ain't Raining then it ain't Training!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Dorset
    Posts
    3,881

    Default

    I've asked that question several times and have always been stonewalled.
    I'll keep tabs on this thread just in case.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Hampshire
    Posts
    2,944

    Default

    The "ease of harvesting" is a very valid point. Whilst shellfish aren't as protein-packed as red meat for example, its relatively easy to harvest kilos of mussels and/or limpets, and a doddle to cook. Fish-traps - once made - do all the hard work for you, and produce a very useful bundle of calories and proteins, along with good stuff like Omega 3 etc. There is a reason why so many primitive tribes lived close to the sea!

  10. #10

    Default

    Info on nutritional values for some wild foods can be found at the links below:

    http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?...bursa-pastoris

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/2441/2

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/uploa...-082-01tab.jpg

    Can't vouch for the accuracy of the figures given obviously
    Last edited by Mr Cake; 02-05-2012 at 17:17.

  11. #11

    Default

    Some figures from a Finnish Defence Forces study of boreal organisms, all per 100 grams of substance. Mouse testing suggested that many of these organisms could be used in survival situation but not for long period of time.

    - Calla (Calla palustris), dried roots - 278 kcal.
    - Bogbean (Menyanthes trifoliata), dried roots - 212 kcal.
    - Yellow water-lily (Nuphar lutea), dried roots - 191 kcal.
    - White water-lily (Nymphaea alba), dried roots - 113 kcal.
    - Birch (Betula spp.), fresh leaves - 56 kcal.
    - Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica), fresh leaves - 51 kcal.
    - Common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), fresh leaves - 47 kcal.
    - Iceland moss (Cetraria islandica), dried - 44 kcal.
    - Sorrel (Rumex acetosa), fresh leaves - 28 kcal.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Yorkshire
    Posts
    23,719

    Default

    Some useful info on this thread Sam
    Rich

    www.trek-lite.com - New Lightweight Backpacking Forum

    Heading North - my trip blog

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Potton, Bedfordshire or alternatively my own happy little world
    Posts
    9,207

    Default

    thanks everyone
    Only the Wilderness is pure truth

    If it ain't Raining then it ain't Training!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •