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Thread: conversions

  1. #1

    Default conversions

    Thought this might be of use to someone. An easy to convert temperature not sure how accurate it is but its easy to remember.

    1. Take the temperature in Celsius and multiply 1.8.
    2. Add 32 degrees.
    3. The result is degrees Fahrenheit. Does any one know of any other easy to remember conversions. I usualy have it in my head when they give out temperature warnings..

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    For me it's allways been, double it and add thirty, close enough.
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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by crosslandkelly View Post
    For me it's allways been, double it and add thirty, close enough.
    .
    Same here, always been close enough for me
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    surely its easier to work in celsius, my Dad is 86 and he seems to have been able to make the change.

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    as above double and add 30 regards dave
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    Actually the formula you've given is EXACTLY accurate.

    The formula as taught in school: C x 9/5 + 32 = F

    9/5 = 1.8 therefore it's the same formula digitalized.
    Last edited by santaman2000; 20-04-2012 at 00:25.

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    Quote Originally Posted by santaman2000 View Post
    Actually the formula you've given is EXACTLY accurate.

    The formula as taught in school: C x 9/5 + 32 = F

    9/5 = 1.8 therefore it's the same formula digitalized.

    Not as quick to work out though.
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    I've never understood farenheit, so I don't really understand why anyone would want to covert from celsius to farenheit in the first place.

    If I ask the question, what temperature does water boil at? everyone answers 100 degrees. Celsius. When does it freeze? 0 degrees. Celsius. Easy to remember, easy to use.

    But then, I'm a metric boy. Others may differ, as is their right.

    The UK went metric in 1971, but most of the population seems not to have noticed.
    Stupidity got us into this mess. Why can't it get us out?


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    I'd like to know how to convert 6 inches into 22 cm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blacktimberwolf View Post
    I'd like to know how to convert 6 inches into 22 cm.
    6 (inches) x 2.34 (centimeters per inch) = 14.04 (centimeters) Fas from exact but close enough (and nowhere near 22 centimeters) Still SOUNDS longer in metric though. LOL
    Last edited by santaman2000; 20-04-2012 at 14:28.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harvestman View Post

    The UK went metric in 1971, but most of the population seems not to have noticed.

    we went SI not every thing uses Metric in UK ie Pipe threads are still BSP and BSPT which is imperial etc


    and the USA are still under the Imperial Rule(r)

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    Quote Originally Posted by santaman2000 View Post
    6 (inches) x 2.34 (centimeters per inch) = 14.04 (centimeters) Fas from exact but close enough (and nowhere near 22 centimeters) Still SOUNDS longer in metric though. LOL
    actually its 2.54cm per inch which is 15.24cm most use 15cm as a 6" approximate ie 1" approx = to 25mm

    22cm is approx 9"

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    Quote Originally Posted by FGYT View Post
    we went SI not every thing uses Metric in UK ie Pipe threads are still BSP and BSPT which is imperial etc


    and the USA are still under the Imperial Rule(r)
    Thanks for the correction in your other post.

    England (and any country that converts to metric) will likely stay on standard measures for pipe threads for some time I would think. Otherwis you'd have to re-plumb every building already in existance.


    Ironicly the US came very close to going metric in the late 1780s (shortly after independence) but decided against it because England was still our most important trading partner and it wasn't metric. In theory we DID go metric in the late 1970s but the general population REFUSES to except it so it's a non starter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blacktimberwolf View Post
    I'd like to know how to convert 6 inches into 22 cm.
    What have you been telling SWMBO

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    [QUOTE=lou1661;1081993]surely its easier to work in celsius, my Dad is 86 and he seems to have been able to make the change.[/QUOTE


    Take away thirty then half it, I make your dad 28 in non decimal.
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    quite a timely thread for me this one, only yesterday i was telling Gemma that i wish i knew a quick and simple way of converting between the two. i'm firmly in the celcius camp, old money means nothing to me when it comes to temperature. "double it and add thirty" seems like a fairly reasonable way to go about it.

    so if it's -10F then...........?
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    The double it and add thirty tip must only work at lower Celsius figures but is handy for working out the weather temperature.

    100 degrees C would be 230 degrees Fahrenheit by that tip, 18 degrees F out?

    Steve.

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    If you have a thermometer that's marked in both Celsius and Fahrenheit you can just read it off. With current computer tools it's childsplay to make and print such a scale to any desired, er, degree of accuracy.

    On the Fahrenheit scale, water boils at 212 degrees and freezes at 32 degrees. In Celsius it's 100 and 0 as has been noted. So there are 180 degrees F for every 100 degrees C which is where the 1.8 comes from. When the C scale says zero the F scale says 32, so take off 32 and divide by 1.8 converts F to C.

    Both scales say the same at -40.

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    A litre of water's a pint and three quarters

    a pint of water weighs a pound and a quarter

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    Quote Originally Posted by entropydog View Post
    A litre of water's a pint and three quarters

    a pint of water weighs a pound and a quarter
    Regrettably in the USA a pint is 16 ounces of water, not 20 like it is in the UK, so you need to be careful with those units.

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    When the weather is cold we are pessimistic so Celsius ie 2c (35.6F) degrees. When it is hot we are optimistic so Fahrenheit ie 95f (35C) degrees. seems the way it works
    Last edited by palace; 21-04-2012 at 18:11. Reason: impiricity
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    Quote Originally Posted by entropydog View Post
    ...a pint of water weighs a pound and a quarter
    Unless it's a US pint. Then it weighs a pound; which inspired the (incorrect) saying, "A pint's a pound the world around" used by cooks to know how much ice to add that will equal a pint when it melts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crosslandkelly View Post
    For me it's allways been, double it and add thirty, close enough.
    Colin.

    Thats what i use just at the end and 1 or 2 for smaller temperature or 3 or 4 for a temperature above 80

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    What's Fahrenheit?
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackcbr View Post
    What's Fahrenheit?
    No idea... I'm all metric, me. Love tabbing clicks

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    Quote Originally Posted by spandit View Post
    No idea... I'm all metric, me. Love tabbing clicks
    LOL. So you're going to stop at ther pub later for a 1/2 liter?

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    Quote Originally Posted by santaman2000 View Post
    LOL. So you're going to stop at ther pub later for a 1/2 liter?
    based on

    On a serious note; does anyone know why one system is paired with metric? It's not like temperature is based on a "meter" or on a "gram." I know Centigrade is based on the freezing/boiling points for water (no idea really what Farenheight is based) on but I honestly don't see how that's really relevent to the metric system as such. Seems like a more apt system for scientific purposes (usually dependent on metric) would be the "absolute" system (Kelvin) which is based on "absolute" zero (the total absence of any heat) at which all molecular activity ceases.

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    Kelvin is the scientific standard. Fahrenheit is based on blood temperature, I think.

    As you said, Centigrade/Celsius is based on the boiling point/freezing point of water, although seeing as those change depending on pressure it's slightly arbitrary.

    Give a man 0.0254m and he'll take 1,609.344m

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    Quote Originally Posted by spandit View Post
    Kelvin is the scientific standard. Fahrenheit is based on blood temperature, I think.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fahrenheit#History

    As you said, Centigrade/Celsius is based on the boiling point/freezing point of water, although seeing as those change depending on pressure it's slightly arbitrary.
    The pressures are specified in the definitions.

    Celsius is the temperature scale, centigrade just means something that has 100 divisions although people do use it to mean a Celsius temperature..


    Give a man 0.0254m and he'll take 1,609.344m

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