Alpkit
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: map and compass work

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Potton, Bedfordshire or alternatively my own happy little world
    Posts
    9,291

    Default map and compass work

    Does anyone have any suggetions as to how i can make the above more interesting?
    all ideas gratefully recieved
    Ta in advance
    Only the Wilderness is pure truth

    If it ain't Raining then it ain't Training!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    west yorkshire, uk
    Posts
    261

    Default

    Make yourself a little orienteering exercise up, where you have to find (for instance) a particular wall junction, mile post, stream or whatever. Join about ten features up, then work your way from one to the other.
    The main problem I find with map reading is that I don't practise it enough as I tend to stick to areas that I know fairly well. With an orienteering exercise, you can still stick to your local area, just look for more specific features than just thinking "I'll go up the usual path to the moor top, then to the stone cicle and then drop back via the dam like I always do!"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    North Staffordshire
    Posts
    1,064

    Default

    Hi Sam, I use a kind of treasure map using a simple map of our local campsite ( the hand drawn one off their website) I added a grid which I numbered. I then hide plastic tubs with a listed ingredient for their supper (breadroll in one, sausage in another etc.)around the campsite near to landmarks and issue the Cubs with 6 figure grid refs where they can find their suppers. They love the challenge.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Mar del Plata , Buenos Aires, Argentina
    Posts
    128

    Default

    get into an orienting race, you'll hone your skills (if you do it on your own, not like those that follow the only guy that knows how to navigate) and give you a better endurance.
    a few months back I run a 80 km race in a mountain range near my city, the experience was amazing, I only regret my poor shoes selection, I lose both toe nails :-|

    Cheers
    Esteban

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    your house!
    Posts
    11,001

    Default

    We did a cracking exercise to show appreciation of dead ground, judging distances, translating from what you see to a map, one was being sat on a high point during a walk and having to lay out what you see in front of you within set arcs( say 30 degrees and out to a prominent feature) without a map, then compare to map once done, the other was to walk a route then draw it to scale to practise pacing, taking bearings to mark position, route planning, both models can be 3D. The winner gets a steak dinner at the Savoy and a night of dancing at the RAC club!
    Last edited by southey; 22-09-2011 at 12:01.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Potton, Bedfordshire or alternatively my own happy little world
    Posts
    9,291

    Default

    i'm not giving the scouts a nights dancing and a steak dinner!
    some good ideas here thanks guys
    Only the Wilderness is pure truth

    If it ain't Raining then it ain't Training!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Mid Wales UK
    Posts
    6,440

    Default

    I made up an exercise for our cadets - who were bored with endless lectures on nav - yet kept on getting lost when out walking.

    A number of cocktail sticks or barbecue skewers of different lengths - they get to "draw straws!"

    Open a map on the table and get them to drop their "straw" on it, then answer a number of questions about the line that it prescribes...

    Grid references of each end
    The distance between the points
    The Grid and Mag bearing both ways
    The height gained or lost along the route
    Use Naismiths rule for each direction
    Notable features if you were to walk the line
    Times per section of route
    features to the left and right
    Whether one end can be seen from the start or where along the route you would be able to see the end or loose sight of the start and how long it would take to walk to those points

    It doesn't have to be all the questions all the time, but they soon get a grasp of how closely they need to study the map to gain an appreciation of the ground, and it gets them into a frame of mind that if we walk in one direction for X minutes, there'll be a turn or a feature that comes into view to tell us we're on the right track before we get to the next checkpoint.

    Sound very involved reading it back but it can be quite easy.

    ATB

    Ogri the trog
    Improvise, Adapt & Overcome
    www.Reddragonbushcraft.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    4,633

    Default

    Going further on Bodge's theme, I'd have thought maybe a bit of geocaching?

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ged View Post
    Going further on Bodge's theme, I'd have thought maybe a bit of geocaching?
    +1 for geocaching.

    We had a go at Geocaching and it really got the Scouts' interest. We will definitely do more when we get chance - and we will hide our own cache, hopefully that will encourage some of them to pay attention to a map.
    A while back we made up some wipe clean boards for "Battleship" but using 4 figure grid refs for the co-ordinates. It was useful for complete beginners at map reading.

  10. #10

    Default

    I like Ogri's idea too - might give that a go with our lot.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •