Alpkit
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Ray Mears Bread Recipe

  1. #1

    Default Ray Mears Bread Recipe

    I saw RM bake a loaf of bread in a dutch oven and really want to try it myself.
    But the measures were a bit vague.
    Ingredients are, a bag of flour (what type and weight ?)
    Milk powder 2 dessert spoons
    Sugar 3 dessert spoons
    Salt 1 dessert spoon
    400 ml water
    1 sachet of yeast

    I would be most grateful if someone could tell me the correct measurements

    Or even another bread recipe for campfire cooking

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    on a hill in Scotland
    Posts
    389

    Default

    I would go with 400-500 gr of flour to match the other ingredients.

    The most a sachet of yeast comfortably can handle is 750gr,but it might be quite dry and not rise well if you use that much.

    Trial and error

    Good Luck
    Ness
    Everybody dies- but not everyone lives

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    south wales
    Posts
    12,290

    Default

    Tesco do a ready mix, just add water 79p, brown, white, cheese .

    Forward where the knocks are hardest, some to failure, some to fame;
    Never mind the cheers or hooting, keep your head and play the game





  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    23

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shorny View Post
    I saw RM bake a loaf of bread in a dutch oven and really want to try it myself.
    But the measures were a bit vague.
    Ingredients are, a bag of flour (what type and weight ?)
    Milk powder 2 dessert spoons
    Sugar 3 dessert spoons
    Salt 1 dessert spoon
    400 ml water
    1 sachet of yeast

    I would be most grateful if someone could tell me the correct measurements

    Or even another bread recipe for campfire cooking

    Thanks
    The difficulty (and the joy!) is that bread making is far more a fuzzy art than an exact science...

    If you are not familiar with bread making at all I'd start with a "quick bread", which uses baking powder as the leavening rather than yeast. There are millions of quick bread recipes out there, just search around until you find a really simple one and give it a try. Quick breads are often much better suited to trail/camp conditions as well, because they are quicker to mix and do not require either kneading or raising periods- just mix them up quickly, form up for baking, and then bake. Most people use a basic quick bread recipe as their staple "bannock" in the bush, and it can then be elaborated in numerous variations with additions of this or that.

    If you really want to move on to yeast breads, start experimenting at home and remember that there can be a huge amount of variability in the ingredients. Essentially bread is just flour, yeast, and water sufficient to make a kneadable dough. A bit of salt improves flavor and acts to preserve the bread a bit. A bit of sweetener (sugar, honey, etc) will improve the taste and promote color in the crust. A bit of milk will improve the texture of the bread. Some sort of fat (butter, oil, lard, bacon drippings, etc) will improve flavor and texture, as will some amount of egg. The combination of these "extra" elements, and the different amounts used, result in the plethora of types of breads- and they are for the most part universally good, so don't be afraid to just experiment or use what you have.

    If you really want to do something like the recipe Uncle Mears gave, don't worry about a specific amount of flour other than just making sure you have a fair bit on hand. Mix the yeast and the water (slightly warm), stir, and wait til it starts puffing a bit [maybe 3-5 minutes- this is "proofing" the yeast]. Then add the sugar, salt, and the milk powder to the proofed yeast and mix this up [thus combining all the flavor components into the liquid]. Now just start adding flour, one cup or large handful at a time, and mixing it in. Keep going until it starts to form a sticky mass that pulls away from the sides. Now start kneading, adding a little bit of flour as you need to just until the dough stops sticking to your fingers in huge globs. Then just keep kneading, the longer the better, but at least until the dough is smooth and elastic (ie: it will pull back into shape if you pull it a bit) adding just enough flour to keep it from getting overly sticky. Then proceed with the shaping, rising, baking. Some breads are allowed to rise once and are then punched down (deflated and reshaped) then allowed to rise a second time. Often one rise is enough though. Then it's off to bake until the crust is crisp and colored and the loaf sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom.

    So basically, just proof the yeast in some amount of water, add whatever "extras" (salt, sweetener, milk, egg oil, etc) you are going to use, and then add flour sufficient to make the dough kneadable. Once you get a basic feel for the basic amounts you don't have to even measure anything, as too much or too little of something will still turn out delicious bread. The only real ways to completely ruin a bread is to not let it rise enough, to make it far too salty, or to burn it.

    Anyway, longwinded but hopefully helpful. Bread-making is great fun, and yummy to boot. Dive in, and good luck!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    hertfordshire
    Posts
    1,120

    Default

    A desert spoon of salt? Sounds like a lot to me.

    I have been making Naan in my dutch oven with good results...

    2-3 cups plain flour
    1 tea spoon of yeast mixed with 1/4 cup of warm water
    couple of tablespoons of natural yoghurt
    1 tea spoon of salt
    2 tea spoons of sugar
    1 egg

    Mix up and let rise until trebled in size. Break of bits and roll thin (about 5mm) and throw onto a very hot dry dutch oven or lid. Wait till it bubbles then turn over until it just starts to scorch.

    Steve.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Under the fading trees.
    Posts
    2,267

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ateallthepies View Post
    A desert spoon of salt? Sounds like a lot to me..
    way to much!!!

    for a 1lb loaf you need no more than a teaspoon, otherwise your kill all the yeast before it does its job, I tend to only put half a teaspoon myself as Im not a big fan of too much salt in the old diet

  7. #7

    Default

    Thanks for all the replies.
    Sorry for not replying sooner, but been away in the wilds of Thorpe, Peak District.
    You've certainly given me food for thought here (sorry).
    And will let you know how I get on with the various recipes.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •