Alpkit
Results 1 to 22 of 22

Thread: Gas Bottle Log Burner NO WELDING required

  1. #1

    Default Gas Bottle Log Burner NO WELDING required

    Hi all, just though I would share this with you, and say thanks as I picked up some tips on this from your forum. I have been wanting to build a log burner out of a gas bottle for a while, but, I can't weld, and if I had to fork out for the kit, or pay a welder, that would defeat the object, and not make it cheap, and I may as well have just bought one off eBay, so after reading through forums such as this one, I eventually worked out how I could build one without any welding required, and here it is, in my lounge fizzing away beautifully.



    It just needs a second coat of paint and I am all done, although I may add a viewing window at a later stage once I get hold of a suitable pyrex lid.

    So here is how I did it:

    Removed the valve with monkey wrench and scaffolding tube (good video on youtube to show you how to do this)

    Then purged the gas by filling it with water.



    Marked and cut out door and cut top off, using angle grinder

    Used old T hinges and old gate latch and bolted on door, with pack of bolts from hardware shop, and cut and bolted on plate to close gap on latch side using the lid of an old deep fat fryer. Door was sealed later with fire rope (approx £1.50 a meter and £3.50 for adhesive)



    The grate was fixed by drilling holes for four old bolts sliding them through and fixing with fire cement, grate rests on those and grinded off points to prevent snagging when emptying ash, used an old grate I had from a BBQ bucket, but have since made a new one from cutting off the base of an old empty thinners drum and drilling lots of holes in, (loads of these lying around), fits perfectly and also useful for other bits, like a baffle which I may add later if I get a thinner top for a hot plate.

    Fixed flue which I got off eBay double lined stainless steel as it is going through cavity wall in old gas fire hole, luckily, they sent me thr wrong size, twice the length I ordered, so even though it cost me £23 I may sell the offcut and get at least a tenner back. Result!



    Cut out hole for flue (keep cut out piece to make flue valve later) and fixed flue by cutting and bending back segments inside and fixing with Fire cement (£1.80 small tub)

    Acquired an old drain cover and cut out top, and again fixed using fire cement, along inside rim and round outside join.



    Again, I acquired an old piece of steel plate off an old canal barge, and used this as a back plate cutting out hole for flue, and placed on two old 3 x 2 concrete slabs to make hearth.



    Before this stage, I burned off all the paint outside, that was great fun in the recent snow, and then finally made the vents, at the bottom I made a sliding air vent using a piece cut out from the left over top of the bottle and making a handle out of an old scrap washing machine foot, also fixed a wooden handle to the door latch (I made my own but you could use an old one), and a flue vent that is outside but can be operated inside by using thick steel wire running through hole attached to cross section fixed to the off cut that fits inside the end of the pipe neatly and fixed on with home made bracket, and again another home made wooden handle. In fact the vents and valves were the trickiest things to get right, getting the air flow just right is the crucial part as research told me and a few practices where the house was full of smoke, but it is perfect now and I am getting a lovely slow burn, with a fast burn when the door is open perfect when re-stocking logs, and I am sitting here in a t-shirt writing this, first time I have been able to do that since August.





    I am sure I have missed stuff but anyway just to show that you can make one without welding, it cost me less than £50, and was great fun to do and building it kept me warm during the "big freeze" and for many winters to come Hope it inspires someone else to do one as your forum has helped me with the advice given to others, any questions, just ask, glad to help. Great Forum btw.



    One thing I would do differently is if you can get hold of two gas bottles, to use the donor bottle to make the door so that it is oversize and maybe then not necessary to use fire rope, or it would be easier to fit it as its a fiddle to do, but works though.

    And I know it's not necessarily "legal" but needs must, and it works, obviously I would only recommend this for outdoor/workshop usage (ahem) :.

    I will post another picture once second coat of paint is on.

    Cheers
    Jats

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Bucks, UK
    Posts
    68

    Default

    Damn that looks good and I absolutely love the axe on display.

  3. #3

    Default

    Nice one jatsman , and no welding .

    Cheers,
    Pete.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arri View Post
    Damn that looks good and I absolutely love the axe on display.
    Gorgeous isn't it, £10, Hickory shaft, I love the feel of the wooden handled ones.

    Yes Pete NO Welding, I even had the cheek to post this on the Mig Welding site as I also got some good tips from there.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    west mids
    Posts
    2,426

    Default

    hi jatsman,
    great idea for keeping warm! nice to see there are still some very inventive and resourcefull characters around!. i would imagine every single inovation had its mishaps, teething troubles, and disasters! but their originators persevered to eventually arrive at the near perfect product that we now have, and to some narrow minded people anything less is just not acceptable.
    as you say, 'needs must' and look forward to seeing mk2, well done!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Maidstone
    Posts
    424

    Default

    some simple 'L' brackets bolted to on keep the top down
    may be a sensible improvement.

    I assume the chimney can take the output

    one of those little cheap carban monoxide dectors
    could be put in the room

    How about a woodgas version?

    Stay careful & alive

    Mike
    I think I need more method

    Album

  7. #7

    Default

    [QUOTE=nigelp;631959]edited by ModQUOTE]

    Well thanks for the concern but I can't see the logic in that emotive statement, so the top "lifts off", which could only happen if was knocked over as it's hardly likely to explode off, and if I did knock it off, I would be there unless I intentionally gave it a really good kick and send the ashes sprawling to the floor and then leave them and go down the pub, so, I think I will be OK, at the most a little smoke leakage. However, I have thought about fastening some catches on to the top should I notice a deterioration in the fire cement.

    some simple 'L' brackets bolted to on keep the top down
    may be a sensible improvement.
    lol Mike beat me to it.

    Good job I am anonymous then uh, or I am sure your friend would be reporting me himself, I mean, installing log burners is a growing and lucrative business, but he shouldn't worry, there are plenty that are smart enough to pay him, or rather his company, a grand or two.

    edit: Thanks wood, the spirit of this site summed up... and yes MKII already being envisaged, and I have found another gas bottle today in fact, so will make that improvement to the door I mentioned using the donor bottle as I can see the fire rope deteriorating over time and a great suggestion for a carbon monoxide detector Mike. Thanks
    Last edited by Toddy; 25-01-2010 at 00:23.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Blair, Nebraska U.S.A.
    Posts
    38

    Default

    Looks good jatsman, I like the design buddy!
    I'd rather be hated for who I am, than loved for who I'm not.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Off the beaten track
    Posts
    1,033

    Default

    Not a bad job mate, should do the do until you can get some better parts or welding gear, as you say needs must. I really dont like all this building regs and carp that are being used. If its your house you should be able to heat it the way you want, weve been doing it for centuries and never had any problems, just another way for the government to get money from you. Just be careful and Im sure it will do you fine as a stop gap!

  10. #10

    Default

    I understand the words of caution given, by the pro fire installer that's what he does for a living, I also sure if you were a professional welder and fire installer you would have done a better job.

    I understand that you however are not a professional welder and fire installer, so well done mate, its far better than anything I have achieved.

    And now you have a few Ideas for improvement I look forward to seeing the Mk 2 version.
    Have a happy life with no regrets, and live long enough to be a burden to your kids.

  11. #11

    Default

    I laughed at the genuine ingenuity of this. Totaly brilliant!

    Reminds me of things I did a long time ago, on a much smaller scale, whilst living in a morris 1100 van.

    A 5 litre paint tin with nail holes punched around the base.....Vacuum cleaner pipe chimney through the lid, and exit out of the quarterlight. (when cars had that sort of thing)

    The most important thing is KEEPING WARM
    Be cautious re ventilation please.

    Swyn.
    "Why,sometimes i've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast"
    The White Queen. Alice Through the Looking-Glass.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Hamilton... scotland
    Posts
    2,759

    Default

    That is amazing , what a cracker of a log burning fire, well done

  13. #13

    Default

    All that is keeping the firegrate in the fireplace in my flat is fire cement, no wait a moment it isn't the grate is loose

    Oh yeah it was supposedly fitted by a professional.

  14. #14

    Default

    Cheers All, I got some good tips on "air flow" and ventilation from various sites and the design was based on this ...



    Although I can't see how this works indoors, just using the door to regulate air flow as that would be far too smokey, although ideal for a draughty workshop, you definitely need vents, and one tip that's been handy, and my first real chance to try it since I heard about it a while back, is the "upside down" fire



    works a treat...

    Will keep you posted on further developments then.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by swyn View Post
    I laughed at the genuine ingenuity of this. Totaly brilliant!

    Reminds me of things I did a long time ago, on a much smaller scale, whilst living in a morris 1100 van.

    A 5 litre paint tin with nail holes punched around the base.....Vacuum cleaner pipe chimney through the lid, and exit out of the quarterlight. (when cars had that sort of thing)

    The most important thing is KEEPING WARM
    Be cautious re ventilation please.

    Swyn.
    a quote from someone really getting where I am coming from, the basics, fire shelter, food, water, as I kick back from a night of impressing a woman with the basics, and the windows are now permanently open, no worries
    Last edited by The jatsman; 24-01-2010 at 13:03.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    west sussex
    Posts
    288

    Default

    Looks good. might use your idea.

    The only critism I can find is there is not much hearth in front of your woodburner.

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arth View Post
    Looks good. might use your idea.

    The only critism I can find is there is not much hearth in front of your woodburner.
    Yup Arth a fair point, I was erring on the side of caution making sure there was a good distance between the burner and the back plate, but with over a week or so of monitoring it now I think I could move it back 4 inches and that would give me a bit more hearth at the front. I will do that next week when I fix the L brackets on the top and fit a new door. Meanwhile the gap has been used for drying out a big pile of Ash logs, very nicely indeed.

    Last edited by The jatsman; 25-01-2010 at 00:01.

  18. #18

    Default

    looks fantastic nice one

  19. #19

    Default

    Just some updates, lid secured with simple L brackets, some pics of the vents and home made handles, have moved the burner back towards the wall a bit, now that I know the back plate is fine, and gives me that bigger hearth, joints are holding fine, but will put an O ring clip around the flue joint at some stage, secured a back plate around the door opening which holds the fire rope in better now, so need for a new door, and just repainted too (not shown in these pics) and it is keeping me very warm, and also knocked up a log store in a morning with some pallets, scrap chipboard, and scrap roof felt for the roof. Now I just need more wood.

    Oh yes, a tip from another site, I took out the grate and have the fire on a bed of sand in the bottom of the bottle instead, this gives a much better burn for wood, which is all I am likely to be using anyway, and with the air coming in at the bottom of the fire, and not underneath, it made a big difference.











    Last edited by The jatsman; 04-02-2010 at 06:22.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Kent, Surrey, East Sussex, West Sussex Borders...lol
    Posts
    1,103

    Default

    Nice one
    Wilderness 1-2-1 - Have you compared an LMF Army to an EXOTAC polySTRIKER XL yet?
    GearPods - Modular Adventure & Survival

  21. #21

    Default

    Love the dry wood stove as well mate, what did you use for the roof
    Have a happy life with no regrets, and live long enough to be a burden to your kids.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    edinburgh
    Posts
    372

    Default

    That's genius. Not trying to trivialise possible H&S problems, but I used a caol fire for years, don't se how burning a shovel of coal under a brick tube in your living room is safe and this might not be.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •