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Thread: Non expensive kit

  1. #1
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    Thumbs up Non expensive kit

    Chris asked me to talk about non expensive kit and perhaps show a photo or two, so here is a picture from Tuesday, me the my (almost) one year old grandson

    My kit
    Thinsulate hat £1.99
    Padded shirt £5.99
    Second layer an 80/20 wool poly mix top, bit like a norgie £3.99
    Base layer 'Long John' Top, £2.99 (with bottoms)
    Trousers M65 poly cotton £12.50
    Gloves (in pocket), Thinsulate type £2.99
    Boots, US Army leather/Gortex/gambrille lined £35
    Socks British Army wool Arctic issue 50p

    My little weather station said it was -5c but I was toasty warm without a jacket, total cost

    £65 head to toe, or £30 if you ignore the boots


    Forward where the knocks are hardest, some to failure, some to fame;
    Never mind the cheers or hooting, keep your head and play the game





  2. #2

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    Good starter kit there.
    Deep in the hart of Texas. Where Men are Men
    and the Women are glad of it

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by traderran View Post
    Good starter kit there.
    Thats the idea, give new people some idea's on starter kit, they can spend more at a later time if needed. Don't see the point is spending £80/$120 on a shirt you only use two nights a year. I've got some wool Pendleton shirts I got from the states, only about ten dollars each plus postage so around twenty dollars all in, they are very good.

    Forward where the knocks are hardest, some to failure, some to fame;
    Never mind the cheers or hooting, keep your head and play the game





  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by rik_uk3 View Post
    Chris asked me to talk about non expensive kit and perhaps show a photo or two, so here is a picture from Tuesday, me the my (almost) one year old grandson

    My kit
    Thinsulate hat £1.99
    Padded shirt £5.99
    Second layer an 80/20 wool poly mix top, bit like a norgie £3.99
    Base layer 'Long John' Top, £2.99 (with bottoms)
    Trousers M65 poly cotton £12.50
    Gloves (in pocket), Thinsulate type £2.99
    Boots, US Army leather/Gortex/gambrille lined £35
    Socks British Army wool Arctic issue 50p

    My little weather station said it was -5c but I was toasty warm without a jacket, total cost

    £65 head to toe, or £30 if you ignore the boots

    + Bonny little lad = Priceless! (o:

  5. #5
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    I have some "Blue Castle" Poly cotton Combats that cost £8.
    Made as workwear they are tough and strong (though at that price I would expect some to have quality control issues) but the puller on the fly broke. This was simply replaced with cord...
    The size on the label was not too accurate (I had to but a size larger than normal) but the fit was great.
    These trousers saw me though jungle expeds and are still in regular use.
    You do not need to spend a fortune on kit but do check out the quality of less expensive kit as it is not always the best made in the world (hence the price I guess) and quality can vary from garment to garment.
    Love makes the World go round......Lust makes it all go pear-shaped...

  6. #6
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    At the risk of stating the obvious, charity shops and army surplus are both good sources of wool sweaters, fleeces, etc. Any chain store thermal underwear will keep you warm, and some of it is cheap.
    When I started hill walking I was told "yer dads old string vest is a good base layer"..........
    and it was years before I could afford a fibre pile (pre fleece days) so I just wore more sweaters. It works, and does not cost much.

    Bigbear

  7. #7
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    Charity shops rock!
    I just bought myself a double size Merino wool blanket for £2.00 (it was priced at £1.49 but I felt that was too cheap...)
    OK it was Dayglo orange, but £6 worth of Dylon has toned it down to a rich golden brown
    I think it may end up as a woolen shirt or two....
    AMerino wool shirt for £6 and a few hours work/fun with a sewing machine - bargain!
    Love makes the World go round......Lust makes it all go pear-shaped...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Fenna View Post
    The size on the label was not too accurate (I had to but a size larger than normal) but the fit was great.
    Yeah, I tell myself that as well.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by durulz View Post
    Yeah, I tell myself that as well.
    Love makes the World go round......Lust makes it all go pear-shaped...

  10. #10
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    I have some "Swannie type" heavy shirts and a poncho made from charity shop blankets.

    You certainly don't have to spend a fortune on kit to get out there.

    By the way, they were made with a hand cranked sewing machine that cost me about a fiver.
    Wayland

    _ _ _Wayland's World____________ Living a life less ordinary.

  11. #11
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    You cant beat ex MOD cotton trousers, i get some of my of my kit FOC from my brother who is in the service but have bought them my self for around £5.
    I have a friend who has gotten me allsorts of posh gear from a snowboardy type place and its either too heavy and restrictive or stays wet for ever. My thermals were from matalan and cost £9 for top and bottoms, socks are MOD, hat and gloves like yours are thinsulate ones from my local news agents ?? £4 all in. Snugpack softie was also issue which was a little more at £25 second hand but worth it.

  12. #12
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    yeah very nice stuff, but where did you get it all from?! hehe
    pete
    All weather is walking weather!

  13. #13
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    At last a thread I can relate to.

    All my stuff is cheap usually bought in sales or off ebay.
    I am surprised how much some of the army stuff has gone up to.
    Tradition means not picking up the ashes, but passing on the flame.

  14. #14
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    I look everywhere, eBay, Lidl, surplus stores, charity shops etc. The padded shirt was from Aldi a couple of weeks ago

    Forward where the knocks are hardest, some to failure, some to fame;
    Never mind the cheers or hooting, keep your head and play the game





  15. #15

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    Good kit at good prices; whatever and however I can get it. Member sales on here is great! (cheers to Ash and Giles so far)

  16. #16
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    Default Cheap Kit

    What a great idea for a thread! I'll weigh in with a couple of things:

    British Army can openers. 99p will get you two. Stick one on your key ring. Simple, nothing to go wrong and effective - I've had mine over 20 years now.

    Military surplus lightweight trousers (the pale green ones with one map pocket on the thigh). Cheap as chips from surplus stores and they are great 3 season trousers in that whilst they'll get wet - they dry in no time.

    Warthog's Crusader Cup lid. I think I paid a fiver for it and it doubles the efficiency of the cup when boiling water.

    Trench Lighter as per the following link.

    http://www.image2000plus.com/store02...oogle&c=202139

    This is a recent find. Less than £6 gets you a solid brass lighter which is just as effective as a Zippo and the fuel compartment is O ring sealed. It uses less fuel than a standard Zippo and lasts twice as long between fills.

  17. #17
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    Sealed with an 'O' ring to stop evaporation

    http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.3734

    Forward where the knocks are hardest, some to failure, some to fame;
    Never mind the cheers or hooting, keep your head and play the game





  18. #18
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    You can get those aluminium Sigg-like drink bottles in Poundland (for...er...a pound each). Each one holds about a pint/500ml.

  19. #19
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    At the risk of sounding controversial, I find it interesting that for some, cheap kit is associated with ‘starter’ kit. Anyone else notice that?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by sapling View Post
    At the risk of sounding controversial, I find it interesting that for some, cheap kit is associated with ‘starter’ kit. Anyone else notice that?
    I guess after 10 years of playin in the woods im still startin then, im happy with that

    I love those trench lighters, are they clean to use i.e. dont leak fuel etc ?
    Are they also easy to use? by this i mean not too fiddly for every day use?

    Sorry for hijacking thread

  21. #21
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    At the risk of sounding controversial, I find it interesting that for some, cheap kit is associated with ‘starter’ kit. Anyone else notice that?
    Yes, I've noticed that, and its a great misconception. I admit I do have alot of gucci kit, but I've either got it for free (internal review purposes) or second hand trade.... and most of it I dont even use. Anything I actualy have to spend money on I go for the pound shop/charity shop/ ebay /bargin bins etc option.


    Ed
    "You will find something more in woods than in books. Trees and stones
    will teach you that which you can never learn from masters."

    St. Bernard

    Official BCUK Facebook page
    https://www.facebook.com/BushcraftUK

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by sapling View Post
    At the risk of sounding controversial, I find it interesting that for some, cheap kit is associated with ‘starter’ kit. Anyone else notice that?
    But if you say cheap kit people don't join in the thread Starter kit sounds nicer

    Its also needed advise for our new (and older) campers. I'm all for saving a few bob where I can

    Forward where the knocks are hardest, some to failure, some to fame;
    Never mind the cheers or hooting, keep your head and play the game





  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by sapling View Post
    At the risk of sounding controversial, I find it interesting that for some, cheap kit is associated with ‘starter’ kit. Anyone else notice that?
    Yeah, I saw that as well. For the last year I've spent pretty much everyday working outdoors (well, up until 3 months ago when I had to go down to 1 day a week cos of college) in all weathers in gear that either came from charity shops or is regarded as starter gear. Not once have I felt cold or uncomfortable, it's not how much you spend but how wisely you buy that counts.
    Beer is life.

  24. #24
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    I have used loads of kit over the years and a lot of it is personal taste ,
    Being a fat knacker I run hot so loads of thin layers work best for me you cant beat a long sleve T shirt , cheap flecce , and a windproof jacket combo .
    Norwegian shirts dont work well in wet conditions but well in cold dry .
    Twodogs

  25. #25
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    I wonder if there is a line where one side there is cheap kit that is adequate and on the other there is cheap kit thats rubbish?
    This forum is an ideal resource for those just starting out,you can ask a question about a piece of kit and get some sensible answers.On the flip side you can also be told that a certain piece of kit is the only one that will do the job and anything else is rubbish.It must be a bit daunting for a new starter to differentiate which is which.
    I have found that of every piece of kit available world wide there is a member here who has had experience of it and is willing to pass on that experience,but you still have to decide who is biased for or against a certain item eg, gerber shovels in a recent thread.
    some of my kit is gucci and some is home made,it all gets treated with the same respect and gets the same use.
    When I can afford it I will buy the very best kit I can afford,but only if it does what I want how I want.
    My kit is bought to be used not admired(well admired aswell as used).One thing that makes me smile is when it starts to rain how many people rush to get their kit into the dry,if you buy outdoor gear surely a bit of rain won't hurt it.I don't decry people who buy the best of everything ,each to his own,but I do get a bit annoyed when someone asks about what kit they should get and are then told that they MUST have this or that kit and nothing else will do.
    As I say each to his own but let new starters have a fair and unbiased reply,by all means if you are impressed with a bit of kit then tell everyone,but don't just run down everything else.Remember some people can't afford some of the prices that are bandied about these days.

  26. #26
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    I would say that it's a case of knowing what to spend money on. For example, I have to wear steelie boots for work, and the ones bought for me were cheapo ones. They aren't that water resistent, nor are they warm. However, I wear good socks (generally hirsch socks), so that counteracts the cheap boots. Likewise, I only wear cheapo, charity shop fleeces, but underneath I wear good quality merino baselayers. My wetproof is either a cheap synthetic one or a cheap wax cotton, both do the job adequately, but both are essentially disposable if they get trashed (which happens a lot when your scrub bashing etc).
    Beer is life.

  27. #27
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    Given my method of earning a crust, I will wear the best gear that (oher peoples) money can buy.
    If I have to part with money for any gear I will look for bargains every time - darn it - I am half Scots and have lived near Cardigan for 30 years, so I am programmed/hard wired for ecconomy!
    Add to that the fact I have lived under or just above the (UK) "poverty line" for 30 years - I just aint got money to burn!
    I have however decided to try and wear more "natural fibres" as they seem to suit my lifestyle better - and they then to come more expensive and harder to find (in some respects) than synthetics!
    Love makes the World go round......Lust makes it all go pear-shaped...

  28. #28
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    Rik, I had no idea you looked so young. And who's the old geezer holding you up?

    :P

  29. #29
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    I actually have a wardrobe full (well, not full but...) of woolen jumpers of various weights bought from charity shops. Have never paid more than a fiver for any one of them. The only problem with wool is getting it washed, it takes for ever to dry out. And I seem to spend my entire working time getting covered in filth, mud, chainsaw chippings or deer blood. However, if I'm confident I won't get covered head to toe in filth then wool beats fleece hands down everytime.
    Beer is life.

  30. #30
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    Yep I like to have a look for cheaper kit. Got my motorbike gear from Aldi as well as merino bottoms for $15 which is cheap for merino.
    Got a poundland bottle cheap carrabiner.... oh and those italian wool tops for Endicotts $7.99 or something I wear mine loads.
    D
    Yes wool can be a bit of a pain too wash but hey you dont have to wash it as much!!

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