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Thread: Vintage pack

  1. #1
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    Default Vintage pack

    Arrived today, an ebay bargain at £18 posted, a nice late 60's early 70's Bergans of Norway external framed pack. All in very good stored condition, just needs washing and reproofing.I'm guessing it's around 45-50 ltrs. Anyone have any experience with them. I'm looking forward using it next month.

    IMG_20171012_143601.jpg IMG_20171012_143659 (1).jpg IMG_20171012_143757.jpg

    IMG_20171012_143812 (1).jpg

    I am not young enough to know everything.
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  2. #2
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    Looks very much like the American framed packs used on their first successful ascent of Everest. Designed and built for Recreation Equipment in Seattle, WA.
    I have one, it's taller with 4 outside pockets. Has lasted me around the world.
    The best part is that the bag is rigged to be easily detachable for carrying loads, even boxes, from one camp up to the next.

    Pro's: for loads, you're going to love it.

    Con's: the back and waist bands stretch when they get wet (sweat or rain/snow).
    Despite the covers, you really better dope up the pocket zippers so they can't freeze.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robson Valley View Post
    Looks very much like the American framed packs used on their first successful ascent of Everest. Designed and built for Recreation Equipment in Seattle, WA.
    I have one, it's taller with 4 outside pockets. Has lasted me around the world.
    The best part is that the bag is rigged to be easily detachable for carrying loads, even boxes, from one camp up to the next.

    Pro's: for loads, you're going to love it.

    Con's: the back and waist bands stretch when they get wet (sweat or rain/snow).
    Despite the covers, you really better dope up the pocket zippers so they can't freeze.
    No zips on this, and the back and waist bands are nylon so no stretch. I guess the Norwegians had the same problems.

    I am not young enough to know everything.
    Oscar Wilde

  4. #4
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    Not sure what the bands are on my old pack. Could even be cotton.
    The old style nylon climbing rope is designed to stretch 40%. I never had to test mine in a fall.

    What does your pack use for pocket closures? Velcro?

    #18 nylon cord stretches also. That's how to dry whip a steel blade onto an elbow and D adze handles.
    I use the #18 tarred nylon seine cord which does have a noticible stretch. Have to take advantage of that.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robson Valley View Post
    Not sure what the bands are on my old pack. Could even be cotton.
    The old style nylon climbing rope is designed to stretch 40%. I never had to test mine in a fall.

    What does your pack use for pocket closures? Velcro?

    #18 nylon cord stretches also. That's how to dry whip a steel blade onto an elbow and D adze handles.
    I use the #18 tarred nylon seine cord which does have a noticible stretch. Have to take advantage of that.
    The main pack is a cotton canvas, and the closures are webbing and buckles. With the struggle I had to get the straps off, I don't think there will be any noticable stretch, but time will tell.

    I am not young enough to know everything.
    Oscar Wilde

  6. #6
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    Oh, goodie. Just wait until your pack binds up with freezing cloud sleet and you have to open a pocket to get your stove!
    Yup, barehanded on a freakin' frozen zipper. Silicone boot spray works OK.
    Climbing mate from Italy always gave the zippers a wipe with ethylene glycol antifreeze.

  7. #7
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    I do not think the bag and frame belong to each other. Bag is to small. But still, a very high quality combo. A great buy! I would not water proof it though, but use an inner plastic binliner.

    The closing system is exactly like on my (very old) Swedish backpack.
    Plastic, but very strong. I used to lube it with Silicone lubricant.
    Last edited by Janne; 12-10-2017 at 20:37.

  8. #8
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    The pack and frame definitely go together, the extra height on the frame allows the attatchment of extra kit, there are a couple of Bergan pack types that utilise that design. Check on google.

    For what reason would you not Fabsil the pack?

    Thanks for the heads up on the silicone lube, I have some in the workshop.

    I am not young enough to know everything.
    Oscar Wilde

  9. #9

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    I had an el cheapo cobmaster version, they were as common as muck in the 70's before frames went internal, I expect that a quality version would be more durable than the one I had. Compared to anything you can get today they were light. You could easily knock up a modern version of the frame with plastic plumbing, joints and araldite.

  10. #10
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    I nearly hit the button on a Cobmaster, new, old stock, still in the wrapper. It did look very lightweight though.

    I am not young enough to know everything.
    Oscar Wilde

  11. #11
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    I did google now and most show the pack going from the top of the frame to about 15 cm from the lower ledge.

    I had a Al framed Fjällräven ( broke the frame, ripped bag) then an al framed Haglöfs backpack ( frame broke) that were basically clones. All went up to the top of the frame. You could buy top extensions so you could add another pack ( sleeping bag, tent) above it.

    I would not treat it as it is an old fabric, do not know how waterproof it will get. If not 100% waterproof - wasted effort and money.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janne View Post
    I did google now and most show the pack going from the top of the frame to about 15 cm from the lower ledge.

    I had a Al framed Fjällräven ( broke the frame, ripped bag) then an al framed Haglöfs backpack ( frame broke) that were basically clones. All went up to the top of the frame. You could buy top extensions so you could add another pack ( sleeping bag, tent) above it.

    I would not treat it as it is an old fabric, do not know how waterproof it will get. If not 100% waterproof - wasted effort and money.
    Configured the pack slightly differently to allow for a larger load under the pack. Here are some pics. RV, they also show the side pocket closures.

    IMG_20171013_114004.jpg IMG_20171013_114016.jpg IMG_20171013_114021.jpg

    IMG_20171013_114031.jpg IMG_20171013_114116.jpg

    I am not young enough to know everything.
    Oscar Wilde

  13. #13
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    Looks absolutely brand new!

  14. #14
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    Thanks. Great pictures. I see they used a cam buckle. Very smart thinking for sleet/wet snow in the wind.

  15. #15
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    Back in the day I had an almost identical pack - but in blue with a yellow lining to the lid, which formed a zipped pocket. The frame was identical. My wife used it for decades before she fell out of love with walking with a pack of any sort....
    Great quality kit!
    Love makes the World go round......Lust makes it all go pear-shaped...

  16. #16
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    Default

    Not this model but in general I always in the past used an H frame, good and comfy..I found as well as light.
    Dont die in the Bundu.

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