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Thread: Bunkers - your very own...

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by gonzo_the_great View Post
    . First time I saw the 'Tellytubbies', I saw it as an construction tutorial..
    You really need to see the the episode of Barbapapa where they make the new house
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    It may seem like a good idea at the time but never open a tin of beans with an axe

  2. #32
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    I had a visit to one, under our old county council building. I mean old, as in, where I used to live, rather than ex-building.

    the centre was a concrete bunker, built into the foundations, with all the telecoms and supplies and booths for controlers for each of the emergency services, for the CEPO (civil emergency planning officer) and staff, to manage a situation until central government was able to take control again.
    Whole racks of documents, with plans, drawingas and list of resources and people.
    it was certainly built for a nuclear event, as there were thick copper earthing strips running around it, to bond to, in case of EMP.

    I did ask what would happen if there was a nuclear blast and would they be beried. Apparently the building was designed so that the floors/walls would be blown through, leaving the steel structure standing. So digging them out would be simplified.

    The parish I lived in had decided that they were going to be anti-nuclear. Which I assume meant that the bombs would just glide over us and get someone else. So our local centre had no such bunker.

  3. #33
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    We visited friends in Switzerland last year and all the houses there had to have bunkers, they were just built into the house. Extra thick walls, air purifying system, huge steel doors and windows etc. The rule is that the room has to be abelto be cleared and occupied within 30 minutes and tehy can stop by at any time to check...
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  4. #34
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    I knew a guy years ago who had a garden that had been railway land. On it, he had a two storey signal box and a WW2 air raid shelter in good condition. I was so jealous...


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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by daveO View Post
    I'd be too paranoid that someone would lock the door from the outside. I'd prefer something in the earthship mould, built into a hillside at the back but with nice big windows facing the sun at the front for a good hydroponic setup.
    That thought of being locked in occurred to me too. I do like the type housing you're describing though



    Not only are they hurricane/tornado resistant, but they're also much more temperature stable (meaning lower heating and cooling costs. The problem is they're not suited for all types of topography.

  6. #36
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    Some more examples






  7. #37
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    I was working on the isle of harris and saw this, or one similar to it.



    Brilliant

  8. #38
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    During the Cold War, Sweden, being on the frontline, had a system where if you build a house with a 'bunker cellar" or build a new garage like a bunker to a certain standard, the state paid for a large % of the cost. Had to be a certain size. Had to have a small room that was full of equipment like canned food and water, body bags, lime powder, meds.

    I guess now all those rooms are cleared out and converted to Man Caves!



    Quote Originally Posted by Tony View Post
    We visited friends in Switzerland last year and all the houses there had to have bunkers, they were just built into the house. Extra thick walls, air purifying system, huge steel doors and windows etc. The rule is that the room has to be abelto be cleared and occupied within 30 minutes and tehy can stop by at any time to check...

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by daveO View Post
    Apparently that's a load of nonsense. They definitely didn't find a nuclear bunker at my local council offices when they knocked it down. It was just a 'sinkhole' apparently

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-s...wales-19984885
    Blimey, talk about services being unevenly ditributed, we get a bunker, Wales gets a hole.
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  10. #40
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    All those pictures show houses that are mostly built above ground level and just have the earth banked over. And not too thickly eather.
    That is a way of fixing the ground water issues.

    Most of the good info I've found, for underground habitable construction, is from companies/sites dealing with cellar building or converting.

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by gonzo_the_great View Post
    All those pictures show houses that are mostly built above ground level and just have the earth banked over. And not too thickly eather.
    That is a way of fixing the ground water issues.

    Most of the good info I've found, for underground habitable construction, is from companies/sites dealing with cellar building or converting.
    Yeah. The ones I posted aren't true bunkers. They're either built into a hillside or have earth banked up the sides. They are very practical for their purposes though (the ones I mentioned regarding storm resistance and temperature stability) And yes, our big problem with true underground construction here is ground water just as you mentioned.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by petrochemicals View Post
    I imagine it's the same all over the country in civil centres.
    In the early 90's i went to an illegal Rave in London Borough of Lambeths bunker. From what I remember it was accessed from a hut on a piece of grass opposite the town hall.

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guzzi Goose View Post
    In the early 90's i went to an illegal Rave in London Borough of Lambeths bunker. From what I remember it was accessed from a hut on a piece of grass opposite the town hall.
    If you remember - you did not take enough chemicals......

  14. #44
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    Shipping containers buried with no retaining walls around them fail very quickly. The strength in containers is in the frame not the sides so they collapse with the weight of the soil, one of the US tv shows on how things work did a demo. On the grander scale of bunkers my wife and I were watching a show about the Mormons in the US who due to their polygamous family ethic lived in a remote part of the country. They had blasted out large caves in the hillside, it looked like red sandstone, and created lovely homes. Obviously natural light only came in the front windows but great idea. The 'hobbit houses' on Harris are lovely looking, facing a great westerly storm in one must just be beautiful. There's another one in the vicinity of Arisaig near Mallaig built in a cliff if I remember really breathtaking.
    I spoke to a few old guys in the ROC and they knew that past the initial few reports they were a goner. I've spent quite a bit of time in and around well functioning MOD bunkers, one built under the casino of the Rock Hotel in Gib. At one large complex I worked in they used to practice 'lock downs' in the 1980's. As the oncoming watch came on, close down the doors and keep it shut for 24 - 48 hrs. Apparently it tested, catering, accommodation, patience and good will. The accommodation was wire frame bedsteads bolted to the wall in the pipe tunnels they were 2 - 3 high. By the time I was there the mattresses had all been removed as a fire hazard. We used to joke about suspicious orders like 'bring your mattress on watch with you' 'Why you ask? No reason and are you aware of the benefits of the common pillow?'. Lets face it once the melty face nukes have hit or the nerve/biological agent has effectively created a desert what fun are you going to have underneath the ground. As a man cave or weekend retreat in the woods though, love it.
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  15. #45
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    There was a piece on TV many moons ago, on underground houses. One that was interesting, was a small shop frontage, which was the post office, backing into a sandstone hill. The back of the shop and the garage at the side, was cut into the hill.
    A couple converted it into a house and dug back to make more space. The inside was all domed and curved, even the shelves were cut out of the stone.
    I recall them commenting about the eaese of building.... If they has extra guests staying, they could just get out the diamond saw and make a new room. (Though I have a feeling that it may be a bit more complicated than that!)
    It was long ago, and I don't recall how they dealt with water. Given the nature of the program, I suspect it was not brought up, as that could have upset the sort of viewers which these house building programs are targetting.

  16. #46
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    Does anybody on her have any 1st hand knowledge of Coober Pedy, Australia?

  17. #47

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    In one of the country pubs earlier in the year and got talking to a bloke that has purchased and is restoring a Royal Observer Corps monitoring post.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_...onitoring_Post

    handily its just down the road from the pub, and near a train station a well . He works as a diver (ex military diver) so is away for long periods of time. When he's back he spends time working on the structure, but its also a good place to kip. He has pumped it out and re waterproofed it, plan is to open it for people to look around at some point, he was looking for original kit to fit it out.

  18. #48
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    I've watched several documentaries on Coober Peedy and Lightning Ridge.
    Essentially, the families live in the front past of the opal mine.
    Just a door in a hillside. They appear to be most comfortable.

    Not all mines are created equal so I imagine that the furnishings reflect the miner's luck with the stones.

    Sooner or later, you have to go out for groceries, mail and other shopping.
    I would melt in that heat.

  19. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by fenix View Post
    In one of the country pubs earlier in the year and got talking to a bloke that has purchased and is restoring a Royal Observer Corps monitoring post.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_...onitoring_Post

    handily its just down the road from the pub, and near a train station a well . He works as a diver (ex military diver) so is away for long periods of time. When he's back he spends time working on the structure, but its also a good place to kip. He has pumped it out and re waterproofed it, plan is to open it for people to look around at some point, he was looking for original kit to fit it out.

    Ha if that’s the one in Kent, I brokered the deal as it was my mate that sold it and it was us that pumped it out. It was sold to a guy that’s a diver and away a lot. He brought a job lot of kit to equip it aswell, including the rare monitoring gauges etc.....
    www.TheTimeChamber.co.uk - Now re-launched.

  20. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by santaman2000 View Post
    Does anybody on her have any 1st hand knowledge of Coober Pedy, Australia?
    Sort of. Helene and I stayed there some years back in the Radeka's backpacking hotel. Almost all of the place is underground, dark and cool, as is a proportion of the townhouses. However getting out to the pub was a real shock - 51 centigrade, and truly blinding sunshine. Mainly because the ground is covered in fine gypsum crystals, which are constantly reflecting sunlight upwards. We spent some time outside fossicking for opal pieces, and it was possible to find some pieces. It is a great place to visit which has also been seen in many films, Mad Max and Pitch Black are the ones I remember off the top of my head.

    http://www.radekadownunder.com.au
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  21. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobnewboy View Post
    Sort of. Helene and I stayed there some years back in the Radeka's backpacking hotel. Almost all of the place is underground, dark and cool, as is a proportion of the townhouses. However getting out to the pub was a real shock - 51 centigrade, and truly blinding sunshine. Mainly because the ground is covered in fine gypsum crystals, which are constantly reflecting sunlight upwards. We spent some time outside fossicking for opal pieces, and it was possible to find some pieces. It is a great place to visit which has also been seen in many films, Mad Max and Pitch Black are the ones I remember off the top of my head.

    http://www.radekadownunder.com.au
    Thanks for that. It's on my bucket list but the probability is slim.

  22. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robson Valley View Post
    I've watched several documentaries on Coober Peedy and Lightning Ridge.
    Essentially, the families live in the front past of the opal mine.
    Just a door in a hillside. They appear to be most comfortable.

    Not all mines are created equal so I imagine that the furnishings reflect the miner's luck with the stones.

    Sooner or later, you have to go out for groceries, mail and other shopping.
    I would melt in that heat.
    I may have misread the articles I have seen, but I thought There was a post office underground as well (I know I reads there was a chapel)

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