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Thread: Better than a Lansky ?

  1. #1
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    Default Better than a Lansky ?

    Gotta say this looks good and better constructed than a Lansky, anyone tried one ?

    https://www.springfields.co.uk/ganzo...sharpener.html

  2. #2

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    I have a aliexpress lansky which does a very good job, very easy, but the stones are wearing. Have looked at this type of sharpener and like the idea you can get replacement stones so easy. Fixing the blade in place does mean you can get a very good edge in a very short time. Plus I like the fact that it can be held in place on a log in the field.

  3. #3
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    I do not know about the jig but the stones look similar in design to stines I've bought before (not saying they are the same, a stone is a stone until you use it). The ones I have are very hard and become blocked very quickly unless you keep them very very wet, especialy the white fine ones.
    A man can do no sin with his own wife,
    Nor can he hurt himself with his own knife

  4. #4

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    I oiled mine as opposed to watered. got a good slurry without them becoming blocked but I do think there is going to be a wide range of quality depending where you get the stones from. I know many water stone fans will say you can not get a perfect edge with these but "penny for penny" and time taken I get a knife that will baton down to matchsticks in 15 mins, which is what I want. I then use shavings and birch bark to start rather than feather sticks.
    More I think about the OP's model the more I think I will get one at the end of the month, if funds allow.

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammock_man View Post
    I oiled mine as opposed to watered. got a good slurry without them becoming blocked but I do think there is going to be a wide range of quality depending where you get the stones from. I know many water stone fans will say you can not get a perfect edge with these but "penny for penny" and time taken I get a knife that will baton down to matchsticks in 15 mins, which is what I want. I then use shavings and birch bark to start rather than feather sticks.
    More I think about the OP's model the more I think I will get one at the end of the month, if funds allow.
    Slurry is more for polishing I'd say.I have just tried (mine)with oil it is working better than dry or just dipped (mine donot holdany water at all). I did try using them under a running tap which worked.even the 180 gives a superb finish and nice and square on a chisel because they are hard. It explains thhe small size and the wierd plastic, I'd always had them down as Chinese things made from high speed wheel abrasive. They are not fast though.
    A man can do no sin with his own wife,
    Nor can he hurt himself with his own knife

  7. #7
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    Default

    Can get the same thing out of Aliexpress for just over 15.00 delivered Robbi, i ive just ordered one :-)

    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Knif...460.0.0.67V0Fp
    It may look like im not doing anything, but at the cellular level im really quite busy.

  8. #8
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    Default

    That does seem incredibly cheap ( Good value ) Kepis, is there a delivery / postage charge as it's coming from The States ?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robbi View Post
    That does seem incredibly cheap ( Good value ) Kepis, is there a delivery / postage charge as it's coming from The States ?
    Nope, i just paid 15.72 delivered from China, i also picked up some diamond stones from a different seller for it too, hope they fit ;-), if not i'll just use them for freehand sharpening.

    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/SURV...311.0.0.YzKMnR
    It may look like im not doing anything, but at the cellular level im really quite busy.

  10. #10
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    Default

    Just spent a while comparing the two ( by pictures only unfortunately ) and the Ganzo one really does look a lot better made and the stones are much much thicker, I've pressed the yes button for free delivery ( 2 - 3 days ), it will be interesting to compare notes when they arrive and had a bit of use.

    I'll be looking to set mine up screwed to a reasonably heavy flat chopping board to make it stable but moveable ( ish.....garage bench to kitchen worktop type moveable )

    I love my spyderco sharp maker and all my knives are shaving sharp using it, I do however have a couple that need a lot of metal removed to recondition the edge so I'm hoping this will do the job.

    Fingers crossed

  11. #11
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    Will let you know when mine has arrived Robbi, will be interesting to see the differences between the two.
    It may look like im not doing anything, but at the cellular level im really quite busy.

  12. #12
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    How about making your own?

    diying is living.

  13. #13
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    good job, very nice indeed.

  14. #14

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    Where does one get the "holey" bit ,where the long horizontal moving rod meets the upright. I could live with a fixed angle to make the thing more simple but still need the sliding action. Oh Yes, by the way, COOL

  15. #15
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    Got the "holey" bit via the Bay, but have forgotten what it's called in English ...
    diying is living.

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  17. #17

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    I use a couple of waterstones free hand. I'm still just learning but have had some success practicing on my old damaged mora companions (carbon and stainless steel - carbon being much easier). I can usually get a reasonably sharp edge - sort of shave hairs on the back of my hand, but not what I would consider razor sharp. I haven't felt the need or confident enough to try with my more expensive knives yet - although I will inevitably need to sharpen them properly at some point I guess.
    Some questions.
    Does it really matter if my knives aren't completely razor sharp? I always clean and strop them them after use - and they will easily cut fingers if not careful so they're still very sharp. But does it make a difference to using the tools practically if they're not 100% razor sharp? I must admit I don't think my skills would be able to tell the difference yet, I'm not the most dextrous.
    Is it possible to over strop? I know/have learned that sloppy technique can round the edge, but if your technique is good can you over strop? I ask because I have a terrible habit of stropping knives in the evening whilst relaxing as I find the repetition very calming, but I'm a little concerned I may be doing more harm than good?
    What's a good test of suitable sharpness for a scandi ground classic bushcraft knife? I see people do the paper cutting test but that just seems to prove no burrs. I was told if a knife catches your nail it's keen enough but just want to check.
    Cheers.
    Stelio.. Stelio Kontos. Stelio.. Stelio Kontos. Stelio.. Stelio Kontos. Stelio.. Stelio Kontos. Stelio.. Stelio Kontos....

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenThis View Post
    Does it really matter if my knives aren't completely razor sharp?
    As long as you're not in need of a razor, no.
    diying is living.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by vestlenning View Post
    How about making your own?

    That looks very interesting and a tidy job.

    Any chance you could do a cut list with measurements of all the parts?

  20. #20
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    I confess to being a little confused by these devices . As they rotate about the pivot the angle on the blade will change - is this so small it doesn't matter? how do you use them and keep a straight cutting edge? At least in Vestlenning's home made one the arm is so long the angle change is reduced but the shorter the rod is the more inaccurate it will be. Am I missing something, have I totally misunderstood how they are used?
    Cheers,
    Broch

  21. #21

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    From my little experience I would say that the variation is almost the same from stone to stone. So while there is a difference along the length of the blade it is still consistancy of edge on a point to point basis. So OK it's wrong but it is always wrong! Much better then I can get by hand.

    Thanks for the part ident, I would of had no idea of it's nameing.

  22. #22
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    The key concept is consistency. The ease of reproduction, time and time again. I guarantee that skill will take practice.
    It's only a slab of steel. Keep at it.
    Given the radius, yes the angle on the blade changes a little. That's the concept behind the attack of a skew chisel.

    Vestlenning's DIY rig looks like a good design, I'd really enjoy fooling with it.
    The bevel angle adjustment looks really secure.

    You could do the task by pulling the stone, moving left or right, pulling the stone again.
    IF, you could hold the consistent bevel angle. Or put the stone down and pull the blade.

    For foods, I'd think 20 degrees in the middle and if that feathers out to 15 at the ends so be it.
    Cleavers don't have straight/square beveled edges = use them rocker fashion.
    Just the same as butchering meat with a flint knife. Not at all straight edge.
    The edge on an Inuit Ulu knife could be straight but is far from it for a reason.

    I was taught to sharpen freehand from my knees, never from my arms. I become the jig.
    Took quite a while to learn to get good at it. Now, I can sharpen a crooked knife over my knee
    without any concern for the quality of what I'm doing.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mesquite View Post
    That looks very interesting and a tidy job.

    Any chance you could do a cut list with measurements of all the parts?
    Added a parts list to my "knife shapening jig" tread over here: http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/sho...21#post1829521
    diying is living.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Broch View Post
    I confess to being a little confused by these devices . As they rotate about the pivot the angle on the blade will change - is this so small it doesn't matter? how do you use them and keep a straight cutting edge? At least in Vestlenning's home made one the arm is so long the angle change is reduced but the shorter the rod is the more inaccurate it will be. Am I missing something, have I totally misunderstood how they are used?
    To make the edge more uniform I do the curve and tip of the blade this way:

    Last edited by vestlenning; 14-09-2017 at 12:31.
    diying is living.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robson Valley View Post
    I was taught to sharpen freehand from my knees, never from my arms. I become the jig.
    Took quite a while to learn to get good at it. Now, I can sharpen a crooked knife over my knee
    without any concern for the quality of what I'm doing.
    Yourself as a sharpening jig is a skill every knife lover should strive for!
    diying is living.

  26. #26
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    I've got nothing against mechanical jigs at all. They're great.
    You've built a really useful one (thanks for the parts list in the new DIY thread, too).

    I was taught freehand and decided that I would learn to be very good at it.
    It took a long time and, few of my edges are knife-straight.
    Mostly, I've turned to the fine finishing grades of automotive sandpapers, up to 2k grit is enough.

    Then, I look around and watch a big-name PacNW native carver sharpen his crooked knife.
    An elongate rock from a river bottom and a bucket of water.

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