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Thread: Defenders

  1. #31
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    xxxxxxxxxxxx.
    Last edited by Janne; 19-08-2017 at 01:18.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janne View Post
    Good anti theft protection is a must. I used to have a kind of 'boot' that locked the pedals
    Clutch claw it's called ....
    "Better weight than wisdom a traveller cannot carry".

    Havamal - the saying of the Vikings

  3. #33
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    I use a Clutch Claw and a Disclock which completely covers the steering wheel. Clutch claw can be a faff when you boots are muddy though.

    Dave
    So many look, so few see.

    I'm not tight! I'm frugal!

  4. #34

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    Defenders are money pits, even if maintained correctly.

    Tonyuk
    "I am not afraid of an army of lions led by a sheep; I am afraid of an army of sheep led by a lion."


    Alexander the Great

  5. #35
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    Xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
    Last edited by Janne; 19-08-2017 at 01:17.

  6. #36
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    I have to say my current one - a 2004 td5 - has been with me for just over 2 years now and has been no trouble at all. And yes, it does get used in the muck and has to carry loads, do towing etc. I dread the day comes when I have to get something else instead.
    So many look, so few see.

    I'm not tight! I'm frugal!

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tonyuk View Post
    Defenders are money pits, even if maintained correctly.
    I think think every car is a money pit!! Overall running costs have been much the same as any other car I have had. Plus, as maintaining it has become something of a hobby, the money I would previously have spent on garage labour costs I get to invest in my tool collection!

  8. #38

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    As the owner of a Defender or two, I'd agree with pretty much everything that's been said about quality, fuel economy, maintenance costs, comfort and reliability. None of them stack up in absolute terms to other vehicles of similar type BUT none of those can be customised, re-built, re-invented and generally mucked about with like a Defender. The near-90 degree angles and flat surfaces all over it make it an ideal base for a bespoke vehicle, designed by the user. Even basic carpentry skills will give you a custom built truck that'll pretty much take you anywhere. And when you get to Anywhere, and it breaks - as it surely will - the technology is so basic that if you can't fix it yourself there'll be a Bush Mechanic around the next bend who can probably do a pretty good job.

    We're on our second "tailored" 110 and we've never had as much fun with anything we've ever owned before. We're constantly improving it, mostly in tiny steps just to see what works best or was just a "good idea" that doesn't stand the test of practical use. We can live in, on or off it in practically all weathers and it's great just to be able to live "off grid" whenever we choose. For us, the "the dream of far off places and overland adventures " has become a reality just because we own this noisy, leaky, thirsty, poorly engineered box-on-wheels. As you can tell by now, we're converts!

  9. #39
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    I would absolutely love to have a Defender! Here in the States they are a rare breed, and pretty pricey.

  10. #40
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    Well my defender just breezed through it's MOT again (maybe a few advisories ). I have to make a tricky decision now whether it's going up for sale or not. We need a campervan more than the landy but with prices going the way they are I dont think I'd be able to replace it in the future if I wanted it back. Maybe I'll keep it for the winter and see how I feel next year...

  11. #41
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    The Series land rovers were basically the 1947 design, leaf spring chassis, up till 1980.
    After that, they went over to a coil spring chassis and were pretty much identical to the original (called classic now) Range Rovers, using most of the same parts. That was the Defender.
    Not long after that, the Series one Discovery came out. Which was pretty much the same chassis and running gear as the Classic Range Rovers, but with a differently styled body. (Actually the Discovery was designed in the mid 60's, before the Range Rover, but they didn't see a market for it, at that time.)
    So in the 80's-90's you had all three designs, superficially different, but build from the same parts bins. How good is that for parts availability (and simplifying how much you need to learn.)

    I ran Range Rovers for years. And the transition to the Discovery was seamless. As I tend to do all my own maintainence, this was important.
    And has been said a few times, they are meccano kits. You can swap bits around and ots of body panels are bolt on.
    My current Discovery 1, had a full replacement inner front wing/light box assembly last year. I brought a fully assembled section, from an aftermarket fab company. Unbolt the outer wing, run the grinder down the firewall and by the radiator, take the rusty quarter off. Bolt the new assembly on, and bolt the wing back on. Less than a days work. Longest time was taken painting up the new stuff with waxoil.

    I'd argue against suggestions that LR are money pits. Mine have cost me very little over the years, as my time is free. So I'm just buying parts.
    Though being busy this year, I have actually had to spend the first real money on one, in the last 20 years. But I have found a specialist independant garage, who I trust, and charge reasonable rates. Using main dealers, is a way to go broke, fast.

    I actually paid to have the silly electronic diesel injection system taken off and a good old fashioned mechanical pump fitted. It was very pleasent to be able to take the ECU out from under the dash and throw it in the bin!
    So it should do me for another decade I recon. Well it better, as I don't think a car should cost more than a few hundred quid a year in maintainence.

  12. #42
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    That's good to know. Discoverys are a lot more common here in the States, and more reasonable. For years, I did my own work on my VW Campmobile, and still have a good selection of tools. I'd like a vehicle that I can do my own maintenance on. Are the later models as user friendly?

  13. #43
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    Import one. Several companies custom build them to your specs, you can get a virtually new vehicle, but with the crucial components of the 'correct age'. Is it 25 years for the US?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Rowland View Post
    I would absolutely love to have a Defender! Here in the States they are a rare breed, and pretty pricey.

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartiniDave View Post
    I use a Clutch Claw and a Disclock which completely covers the steering wheel. Clutch claw can be a faff when you boots are muddy though.

    Dave
    Good for the opertunist but the serious toe rags simply plonk it onto a low loader or drag into the back of a lorry.

    K
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  15. #45
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    Only way to maybe get a vehicle back from those pros is a hidden tracker and police that care.
    To buy and install a tracker is easy, the last bit can be difficult.

  16. #46
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    I think 20 years, which really doesn't seem that long ago!

  17. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Rowland View Post
    I think 20 years, which really doesn't seem that long ago!
    It does not matter if 20 or 25. The company building them just use an age correct vehicle to start with. Think VIN plate, then go from there.
    If you order it straight from those companies you save lots of cash. Lots.
    Last edited by Janne; 09-09-2017 at 02:39.

  18. #48
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    I just picked up my Defender 110 from the crash repair shop; someone smashed into me driving too fast down our single track road (them, not me). I knew I missed it (it's been away 4 weeks) but didn't realize how much till I jumped in

    It's a 59 plate and I've had since new - exactly seven years. She's done 105K miles of tarmac and off-road and in that time had to have a clutch master cylinder replaced. Considering where she's been and what she's done I actually think that's more reliable than most modern cars. I've trekked in a Defender in the Sahara, Namibia, into the Arctic circle and, of course, all around the UK and I wouldn't do it in any other vehicle (except maybe a G Wagon but I can't afford one of them).

    I also have a Series III 88" truck cab which I love. I use it to get in and out of the wood and the occasional local trip.

    I can't imagine life without a Defender or a Series.

    Cheers,

    Broch

    Series III in wood.jpg

  19. #49
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    If you are on a sensible budget then I do not recommend a G wagen. I am seriously rebuilding/ modding one and if I mentioned the budget to the wife she would do a Lysistrata on me.

    Scarily expensive parts.

  20. #50
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    My 'guy' just ordered the engine for the 'G'. On his recommendation we are getting a 508 Bhp one, as the parts are better. Forged crank is one of them.
    Also new Dana axles which was not on the initial plan. Stronger and saves time when they make the propshafts. As those will be made in the US, transfer box too, it is easier to keep to the same country that uses the same measuring system.
    Last edited by Janne; 15-09-2017 at 22:37.

  21. #51
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    Broch it's gorgeous!!!

  22. #52
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    508bhp? It should pull a house!!

  23. #53
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    473 ft lbs tourque.


    I have another car that has 434 ft lbs. Rear tyres spin in third if I disconnect the electronic whatever. The G has no aids, but drives on 4 wheels, albeit less than half of the width.

    It will be interesting!

    A friend had a G with the V12 Biturbo, but the electronical help can not be disconnected fully.

    Yes, Broch's Series 3 is beautiful. Looks nicer than a Defender, imho.
    Last edited by Janne; 16-09-2017 at 00:43.

  24. #54

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    i love my defender, its a 1991 model 90, soft top, ex-mil that i have fitted a 200tdi to and demil'd it a bit.

    It works hard taking stuff to the tip, moving my beehives around and stuff like that. Recently carried 1 tonne of slate for a garden project, i also use it as a mobile bird/wildlife watching hide - you would be amazed what you can get near to in it. I also use it a lot for some of my other 'niche' hobbies to carry tools around (investigating ww2 and cold war underground places)

    I also do the odd green lane in it but mainly it earns it keep working. i love it. sometime when its warm i jsut take it for a drive with the roof and door tops removed. its a lot of fun.
    www.TheTimeChamber.co.uk - Now re-launched.

  25. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Rowland View Post
    I would absolutely love to have a Defender! Here in the States they are a rare breed, and pretty pricey.
    Tatas Indian, wait for Indian production to begin. Saying that they better make sure that the replacement is a great improvement otherwise the presses they sell off will be making cars that are in great demand.

    The original land rover power train (pre update to defender 1992?) was renowned for oil leaks and over heating, primarily in hot environments, which is why the toyota land cruiser isuzi trooper and mitsi shogun did so well in Australia where land rover did not have a good reputation. The new engineering did a lot to fix this. It was initially designed for cold damp britian, in the time where cars blew up if they did 70mph for over 1/2 an hour.
    A man can do no sin with his own wife,
    Nor can he hurt himself with his own knife

  26. #56

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    Quote Originally Posted by petrochemicals View Post
    Tatas Indian, wait for Indian production to begin. Saying that they better make sure that the replacement is a great improvement otherwise the presses they sell off will be making cars that are in great demand.

    The original land rover power train (pre update to defender 1992?) was renowned for oil leaks and over heating, primarily in hot environments, which is why the toyota land cruiser isuzi trooper and mitsi shogun did so well in Australia where land rover did not have a good reputation. The new engineering did a lot to fix this. It was initially designed for cold damp britian, in the time where cars blew up if they did 70mph for over 1/2 an hour.

    Yeah th 2.5TD was carp. Renownerd for overheating and melting pistons. It was basically the earlier 2.5 non-aspirated diesel that they slapped a turbo onto

    the TDi that followed was much better, and imo the earlier200tdi better than the 300tdi because it's more forgiving on coolant loss as the pump is lower than in the 300tdi
    Last edited by MrEd; 18-09-2017 at 06:52.
    www.TheTimeChamber.co.uk - Now re-launched.

  27. #57
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    If they start producing the Defender in India, they would need to do some serious improvements and changes if they want to import them to the US in greater numbers.
    I personally do not think it s feasible.
    For a start, it is too narrow inside. Mericans like ( and need) a wide front space for the driver.

  28. #58
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    It is narrow for a reason, Janne. That isn't a defect, it is a design feature.

    A day when you have a legitimate, practical reason to use an axe is a good day.

  29. #59
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    Tell that to the well nourished American boys and girls.....

    I am not fat, but still hit my elbow against the door. Some feature!!

    Sill love them though.

  30. #60
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    All experienced landy drivers develop the 'landy steering' hold; 1pm and 7pm. In summer you stick an elbow out of the window.

    I was being serious about saying it was a 'design feature'. The Landy's width is chosen so it can fit down the narrowest of rural roads in the UK and (originally) europe.

    Also makes it easy to park in narrow parking spaces that are a tight squeeze for a modern car!

    A day when you have a legitimate, practical reason to use an axe is a good day.

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