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Thread: NW Highland munros - with a dog

  1. #1
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    Default NW Highland munros - with a dog

    Hey guys, I'm planning a short 3 day camping trip up to the NW highlands, originally I was looking to hit Ben More and Conival in Assynt or maybe Beinn Allgin. I think I am going to bring my dad's dog (2 year old collie) with me, but the thing is she is not off-leash trained and I would like to avoid any gnarly scrambles, sharp scree, or narrow (dangerous) ridges. She's fine up the hills (took her up Ben Lomond) but I want to avoid getting yanked off a cliffside

    If you throw me some recommendations bear in mind I'm looking to stick close to the Kintail / Torridon / Assynt coastal area as I intend to do some beaches. I was toying with the idea of hitting Cape Wrath as I missed the hike out last time I was up there but it might be a touch far for the dog in the car.

  2. #2

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    I cant help with suggestions, but one thing did occur to me......

    As a wildcamper who takes his dog with him, I would think twice about taking a dog with you that isn't great off the lead. Even more so in an area so remote.

    My two Dal's are great off the lead, so they don't give me any bother. But, I took my mums Dalmatian with me a few years back, who isn't good off the lead, and I spent the next 24 hours wishing to god I hadn't. I had miles to walk to the site I was camping at, which I probably doubled in distance chasing that dog! It turned a relaxing experience into one of stress and exertion. Didn't help that when I finally reached my spot, set up, to find mums dog didn't do tents, and would try dig her way through the floor of the tent! That was a cold sleepless night I can tell you!

  3. #3
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    Hey there,

    Well that's me back now. The dog was a proper champion - apart from on the way down when she spotted deer and would have taken off straight down the bloody mountain if it hadn't been for the lead. She has enough sense to realise when it's time to be serious and was quite capable (Even seemed to enjoy) the mad scramble I took her up.

    We didn't make it to the top of the munro, a combination of heavy pack, dog, and lack of planning (why did I pick a pathless munro, left my OS map in the car, etc). Pitched up about 700m up on a nice little flat bluff by a waterfall.

    Last edited by Highbinder; 22-07-2017 at 12:57.

  4. #4

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    Looks nice. What breed do you have?
    Our border is aging now at 11 and is losing interest in long walks. We're on the look out for a bush crafting dog and open to ideas.



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  5. #5

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    If you like to cover a lot of miles, Dalmatians are great Very alert at night (guard dog) and will happily out run/walk any human.

  6. #6

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    Thanks. Might start a new thread, don't want to hijack this one!!


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  7. #7
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    Collie, 2 years old, but it's my dad's dog really. Feel free to discuss as you wish! I've always had collies growing up but in terms of breeds I quite like the Swedish Vallhunds, a good smallish outdoorsy breed.

  8. #8

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    Our border has been walking, climbing, running, Biking and to the tops of mountains with me but now she's lost a lot of interest.
    She still goes crazy for cats, squirrels and hedgehogs though and she loves sheep so I've always had to be careful.


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  9. #9
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    I have a collie/greyhound lurcher and he loves mooching around with me. Even has his own sleeping bag for the overnighters . 4 years old and still cries like a baby when I have to go out without him. Mans best friend right enough
    Always give more than you take

  10. #10
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    Lucky she didn't take off after sheep. Sheering time and putting the sheep back out. Could have been a different conclusion

  11. #11

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    Always on the lead around livestock.


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  12. #12
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    I'd love to be able to train the dog out of the herding / hunting instinct but it seems so ingrained in a collie. My dad's dog is pretty obedient, and very empathic, but training has hit a brick wall when it comes to her 'locking on' to other animals, be it other dogs, sheep, or in the case of this trip, deer. She's never off the leash with me and it's a great pity!

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