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Thread: Cooking a leg of lamb over campfire

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwardo View Post
    Ground Oven. About 2-3 hours. Wrapped in ramson leaves. Lovely.
    That would work for me
    "Nature is an old lady with few suitors these days, and those who wish to make use of her charms she rewards passionately" Tim Krabbe

  2. #32
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    Ive done the butterflied version many times. Works well on the grill as excessive fat has been trimmed away. Usually marinated over night in lemon, garlic Rosemary salt and pepper. Sort of a Mediterranean version.

    Had bone in version cooked for me on a ranch in Brazil once, when they just threw a whole big leg on a very hot fire (grill).

    I was trying to tell them it wasn't going to work but then they kept pulling it off every 10 mins or so and carved perfect really thin slices, doner kebab style which were nice and caramelised on one side and pink on the other. Then they threw it back on for another 10mins while we ate salad and drank wine.

    Worked really well but takes a brave man!
    "When it rains, we get a little wet, and when the sun shines, we get a little hot"

  3. #33
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    I was away with the scouts a few weekends ago, someone got a whole chicken and made a cover out of foil which looked a little like an umbrella [a very deep umbrella] to cover the chicken. It didn't touch the sides of the chicken and had an open bottom, this whole lot was then suspended on a tripod over the fire maybe two or three foot above [not a massive flames roaring fire] a decent size with lots of hot coals. This was left there for around three hours and was very tasty and didn't last long in the eating.

    I'd imagine this would work for lamb also?
    Last edited by mousey; 17-05-2017 at 08:08.
    If you think education is expensive, try ignorance.

  4. #34
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    And as if he was listening, Carlise195 has just cooked a leg over open fire.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IpWCoPHHUsw
    http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/customsignatures/sigpic35919_2.gif

  5. #35
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    A spit works well. Simply locate the spit off to the side of the fire and wrap the meat in foil for added protection. Rotate regularly and keep the fire under control. I've done this successfully with a haunch of venison which was probably the same size as a typical leg of lamb. It took about 4 hrs and tasted sublime!

    To be brtually honest though, the easiest way to cook joints of meat over fire has to be in the dutchy. Pulled pork is always a winner!
    Barneys Bimbles and Adventures, check out my blog for tales and photographs of my outdoor adventures.

    http://barneysbimbles.blogspot.co.uk

  6. #36

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    How about cooking in the mud https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqsRepcaFfg

  7. #37
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    This would work for a leg as well.

    I am not young enough to know everything.
    Oscar Wilde

  8. #38
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    I have never done it , but I want to.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=MuLhte7_48k
    A man can do no sin with his own wife,
    Nor can he hurt himself with his own knife

  9. #39
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    These guys from the Almazan Kitchen are so confident = not the first time. Notice the cleaver = one multipurpose blade.
    I can do chunked bison roasts like that in the oven. Outdoors would be fun.

    Amy Turner: Mom taught us kids to cook fish in clay jackets in the fire.
    Make a groove with your finger tip all around the fish just before you bury it in the coals.
    Makes the clay easier to crack open with a rock & a stick chisel.

  10. #40
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    If the forest is in your back yard, yes.

    I do not think I could carry all that stuff together with my usual equipment.
    Looks really delicious though. Something to try at home. Wonder if a well hopped beer like Urquell could replace the hop cones?

    Ever tried cooking whole fish in a salt jacket?

  11. #41
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    The Alamazan guy is obviously a professional chef, with that forest on his doorstep. But one can aspire.

    I am not young enough to know everything.
    Oscar Wilde

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosslandkelly View Post
    The Alamazan guy is obviously a professional chef, with that forest on his doorstep. But one can aspire.
    He must be. And a good one too.

  13. #43
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    I'm not willing to even bet that those guys are professionals.
    What they reveal is how straight-forward such stunning dinners can be prepared
    with a single tool, the cleaver, a couple of pans and an open fire.

    The Eggs Benedict episode is absolutely appetizing, as well.
    Same single cleaver, same brilliant photography.
    No trick kitchen, a couple of pans is all. No culinary gymnastics.
    The only 3 words you need to know from those guys: don't burn it.

    Are you allowed to build a cooking fire in your garden?
    We are.

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