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  • 10 Reasons to Bushmoot - 4/10 - All Things Archery

    My annual holiday to the BCUK Bushmoot would not be complete without a bit of bow making and some time down on the range.

    About ten years ago I was introduced to bowmaking by my friend Bardster (Paul Bradley). Bardster used to run workshops at the Moot which were always well attended. I then studied under John Rhyder of Woodcraft School and made a number of different bows from Ash Flatbows, Holmegaards and the Father & Son bow.

    Bushmoot Archery



    The Father & Son Bow

    I introduced to the Moot a number of years ago the Father and Son bow (I had learnt this of my friend Mark Emery of Kepis Bushcraft) This is a 'quickie' bow to make and comprises two rods (usually hazel) strapped together. The bows take only an hour or two to make if you know what you are doing although they may take up to a day to make if you are new to it all.

    I have run quite a few classes over the years at the Moot on the Father & Son bow. As you can see in the pictures below they were large classes.

    The Father & Son bow



    Nowadays Chris Pryke runs this class and it is well attended each year. The bows if made properly can last you years. I still have and use my first one which is over 6 years old now.

    In new hands



    I have had hours and hours of fun making and using these bows over the years. They are cheap to make, very accurate with practice (normally I shoot them between 10 and 20 metres) and will shoot on a high arc about 60 to 70 metres.

    Father & Son Bow in action



    The Bhutanese Bow

    One of our long-term members is Wayne Jones of Forest Knights bushcraft school. Wayne is an expert bowyer and taught me a few years ago to make a Bhutanese bow. This type of bow is made of a large piece of bamboo and relatively quick to make (about half a day I think it took me).

    The Bhutanese Bow



    The bow is constructed of two separate pieces of bamboo joined in the centre. The join can be with, tape, cord or with pins.

    Building the Bhutanese bow



    Most folk who start one of these bows can be found down on the range in the evening.

    We started the range at the Moot about six years ago. it is well away from all the camping areas surrounded by wooded sand dunes. There are two Bhutanese bows in the top picture below in action and I am holding one in the bottom picture below.

    Bhutanese bows in action



    Traditional Bows

    Wayne sometimes runs workshops similar to the ones Bardster did in the past making more traditional style flatbows. I hope to one day make time to study under Wayne as it has been a few years since I have made an Ash Flatbow.

    Classic bows



    The Mini Bow

    The final type of bow that is produced at the Moot is the Mini bow. Wayne uses the large pieces of bamboo he brings along for the Bhutanese bows to also make these very small Mini bows. The kids absolutely (and a few adults) love them.

    They do not take long to make and are small enough to be made as one piece.

    The Mini bow



    Different Bows

    On the range you will see a wide variety of bows in action from the traditional (top two have my Ash Flatbow and my Holmegaard in use.

    Below them are some of the modern bows people bring along to the Moot. Some are very powerful and come with all manner of attachments. When it comes to the competition we hold we do not mind what type of bow you use as long as it does not have extras such as stabilisers, sights or gears attached.

    Old and new



    I am always intrigued with the different bows that appear and was particularly interested in the Mongol style bow Lisa had brought along as I had never seen one before (bottom right).

    Bows in all sizes



    Each evening during the Moot (and sometimes during the day) a few of us troop down to the range for a shoot. Running the range is usually Cap'n Badger, Paul Pomfrey, Ian Woodham and myself.

    We try and balance the time between teaching novices and letting the 'Old and Bold' have time to keep their eye in. After a full days teaching bushcraft having to do this can initially feel like a chore to me however once I have shot in a few arrows it can be quite relaxing, especially after a very busy day.

    Hard contests



    Competition day happens usually in the second week of the Moot and it gets very competitive. We normally run two competitions, one for the kids and one for the adults. They have to shoot at different ranges and are closely marked by the referees as there are usually some very good prizes up for grabs.

    Over the years



    Afterwards when all the scores have been tallied up the thing I really like about this time down on the range is how good natured everyone is.

    The winners get first dibs at the prizes (everyone brings a prize for the pot with a few extras donated) however everybody walks away with a prize at the end.

    Having fun



    I have been to many different types of bushcraft shows, courses and meetings over the years but it is only at the BCUK Bushmoot that I see such a wide range of archery on display.

    Cheers

    George
    Bushcraft Days
    Comments 1 Comment
    1. Dark Horse Dave's Avatar
      Dark Horse Dave -
      Very nice photo story; nice to see so many familiar faces too - can't wait for August!