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gregorach
13-10-2005, 16:57
The mention of cheap whisk(e)y as a worming treatment in another thread just reminided me of something I've been meaning to ask...

I generally regard a bottle of good single malt whisky as an essential item of kit for a really enjoyable camping trip. In the past, I've always drunk untreated water (without ill effect so far) but recently I've gotten a bit more cautious and purchased a Pre-Mac water purifier. I can live with the iodine flavour in water and tea, but it seems a real shame to pollute a fine whisky with it.

So, my question is: is whisky itself an adequate water treatment, and if so, what dwell time would be needed for safety? I usually drink it 50/50.

Povarian
13-10-2005, 21:33
Can't answer your question, but is there any reason you don't mix it with known safe water before you go?

bikething
13-10-2005, 21:57
You put water in your whisky??

SACRILEDGE :eek: :eek: :eek:

PhilParry
13-10-2005, 22:06
aaah....but aficionado's tell me that adding water to Whisky brings the full flavour out.....

Being the pleb I am, I still don't!!


Phil

PS Smile....it makes people wonder what you've been up to!

mark a.
13-10-2005, 22:07
Of course you need water in your whisky/whiskey. It opens up the flavours. Try Talisker without a few drops of water - eek!

(I'd have thought 50/50 is probably a bit much, though!)

bikething
13-10-2005, 22:29
Laguvalin's favourite here at the moment, but very difficult to find lately :( :(

JohnC
13-10-2005, 23:14
Just try a cask strength Laphroig without water and you'll never wonder about whether to put water in it again.
All the off the shelf whiskys have water added to bring them to 40o. When they come out the cask they are 50-68o, then they are diluted to provide a consistant product.

try http://www.wmcadenhead.com/
for unfiltered cask whisky

Rebel
13-10-2005, 23:31
I might be wrong but I seem to remember that whiskey or any other distilled drink does not purify your water at all.

Distilled drinks are also already diluted with water to bring them to the correct alcohol volume (whether for legal, duty or taste reasons).

I always drink my whiskey straight. This idea of mixing it with water to bring out the flavour is a new one on me, sounds like sacrilege, but maybe I should try it anyway. How much water does one put in?

Rebel
13-10-2005, 23:35
Okay I checked out this link. Seems it's kosher to put water in whisk(e)y but I think I'll continue to enjoy it straight.

http://www.argyllonline.co.uk/index.asp?id=216

Viking
13-10-2005, 23:41
There is ome old regliment fro mthe swedish army from when swedish soldiers were on UN mission. There is a lot if info and expereinces in purifying water but in the last sentance it says "Just to be sure we drink a lot of beer".

moko
14-10-2005, 01:23
Errrr.....why not take more whiskey and forget about the water altogether?
problem solved. :D

JoshG
14-10-2005, 07:56
Mmmmmm.....whisky.... :)

Celt_Ginger
14-10-2005, 09:00
Drinking Whiskey as all about personal taste. If you want to put Coke or lemonade or even mango and passion fruit into it, then thats up to you. Take it whatever way YOU like it. You are not drinking it to please anyone else, just yourself. Personally, I like it with a little water and some Ice, or, add a dram to some Baileys for an extra kick. as I understand it, Adding Whisk(e)y to untreated water will not purify it. Another question though, is Should we be drinking a lot while out in the woods, with knives, axes and perhaps an open fire?

gregorach
14-10-2005, 10:28
Well, I wouldn't advise getting totally wellied, but a couple of drams of an evening by the fire is just the thing. :)

I used to be very much of the "no adulterating whisky, ever" school, but I have come around in the last few years. Now I really do believe you need a little water to open the flavour out properly - this is especially noticeable with cask strength whiskies. The amount varies according to the whisky and the mood.

As for diluting it before you go - that's a no-no. It would mean that you can't share it with someone who takes it either unwatered or with less water. Plus it's adding yet more weight to your pack, and there's really nothing like soft highland water in your whisky anyway - much better flavour than the chlorinated town stuff IMHO.

I'm pretty sure that ethanol will kill off most of the beasties even at fairly low concentrations, but I don't know about the hard ones like cryptosporidium (sp?). Obviously it won't do anything for chemical contaminants.

mark a.
14-10-2005, 10:45
Rather than using the Pre-Mac, could you just boil up some water instead? Obviously let it cool down before adding to the whiskey.

Rebel, the amount of water is dependent on personal taste and on the whiskey. For a new whiskey, just put in a drop at a time, tasting as you go - not only will this help you figure out the right amount of water, but also really shows what a difference it makes. For Talisker I tend to put in a fair few drops, but Oban doesn't really benefit at all, so straight works for me.

gregorach
14-10-2005, 10:51
Yeah, but it takes ages to cool and you end up boiling out a lot of the oxygen, which can make it taste "flat".

ilovemybed
14-10-2005, 13:10
Why not try rainwater, or dew*? They're pure enough and you only need a few drops in a whisky to set it off.




* Use fresh morning dew in whisky at your peril. You still have most of the day to deal with...

C_Claycomb
14-10-2005, 21:47
Just bear in mind that whatever you collect your pure rain water or dew in or off needs to be pure too. Mopping dew off the grass in a pasture does not really count :rolleyes:

innocent bystander
14-10-2005, 21:58
I have a book somewhere that i "forgot" to take back to the school library, many moons ago, about the ridgeway.
The author swore by adding just enough whiskey to your water supply to make it a pale straw colour. Apparenty it is revitalise the fibres, or something. I think not...

Anyway i prefer Jamesons....

runs off and hides :tapedshut ;)

Lost in civilisation
15-10-2005, 20:14
I have heard it said that after boiling water to purify it, it becomes `flat ` as all the oxygen dissolved in the water is boiled out.

Apparently pouring it back and forth between two containers helps to dissolve some air in to the water improving the taste. Probably best done by vigorous shaking in a half full water bottle.

Can anyone confirm this :confused:

arctic hobo
15-10-2005, 21:41
Well, I wouldn't advise getting totally wellied, but a couple of drams of an evening by the fire is just the thing. :)

I used to be very much of the "no adulterating whisky, ever" school, but I have come around in the last few years. Now I really do believe you need a little water to open the flavour out properly - this is especially noticeable with cask strength whiskies. The amount varies according to the whisky and the mood.

As for diluting it before you go - that's a no-no. It would mean that you can't share it with someone who takes it either unwatered or with less water. Plus it's adding yet more weight to your pack, and there's really nothing like soft highland water in your whisky anyway - much better flavour than the chlorinated town stuff IMHO.

I'm pretty sure that ethanol will kill off most of the beasties even at fairly low concentrations, but I don't know about the hard ones like cryptosporidium (sp?). Obviously it won't do anything for chemical contaminants.

Water in whisky :rolleyes:
Since you can't use tablets (taste), you need to boil it to get rid of nasties. Then stand it in a billy in the loch to cool it down - even better if you keep a little bit overnight in the snow so it freezes into a homemade bit of pure ice... this helps cool the water as well (I can't imagine whisky tea and I don't want to :eek: ), and it looks good too :cool: To get around the flat water, blow through it with a straw- this takes a while but works.
This would take a good few hours to do properly, and an overnight for the ice but I don't see any other way :dunno:

Toddy
15-10-2005, 22:22
Whisky & *water* :eek:
No.......
Whisky & Irn Bru :D
Try it before you have hysterics on me ;)
Oh and it *has* to be Barr's.

My malt drinking son says I'm a philistine :confused:

Back to the thread though,
http://www.dalbeattie.com/domesticcivildefence/foodlist.html
(see the bottom of the page)
seems 70cl alcohol at 37.5% vol will sterilise up to 11.9 litres of water

Cheers,
Toddy

gregorach
16-10-2005, 14:35
Aha! Great link Toddy! :) So 2% alcohol is enough to deal with bacteria - splendid. That's low enough that you could actually avoid dehydration using it as an emergency water treatment.

Wouldn't have much flavour at that level though! ;)

Toddy
16-10-2005, 16:33
Aha! Great link Toddy! :) So 2% alcohol is enough to deal with bacteria - splendid. That's low enough that you could actually avoid dehydration using it as an emergency water treatment.

Wouldn't have much flavour at that level though! ;)

Neat way to sterilise water though and a damn site less harmfull if you have a spill than the toxic pink permanganate :D
Means that all those bottles of sloe gin, noyeaux and good malt that come along to meets are a bushcrafting necessity ;) :rolleyes:

Cheers,
Toddy

Rebel
16-10-2005, 20:02
Aha! Great link Toddy! :) So 2% alcohol is enough to deal with bacteria - splendid. That's low enough that you could actually avoid dehydration using it as an emergency water treatment.


I'm not sure how accurate the information on that Website is. I'm not saying it's wrong but I'd like to get more scientific information before I risked drinking water that could be contaminated.

I know that in ancient times weak alcoholic drinks were drunk instead of water.

I found this article that somewhat confirms the use of alcohol
http://millennium-ark.net/News_Files/Water/Water_Wine.html

But how long should the water and alcohol mix be left before consumption and will it kill Giardia and Cryptosporidia?

Gorge
16-10-2005, 20:25
[QUOTE=arctic hobo] can't imagine whisky tea and I don't want to :eek: QUOTE]

Have you never heard of hot toddys?

to some whiskey, add some hot water (boiling water will evaporate the alcohol off) freshly squeezed lemon juice with a slice of lemon, a spoonful of honey and a clove.

perfect drink for sitting by a campfire, especially in colder weather

arctic hobo
16-10-2005, 20:35
[QUOTE=arctic hobo] can't imagine whisky tea and I don't want to :eek: QUOTE]

Have you never heard of hot toddys?

to some whiskey, add some hot water (boiling water will evaporate the alcohol off) freshly squeezed lemon juice with a slice of lemon, a spoonful of honey and a clove.

perfect drink for sitting by a campfire, especially in colder weather
I was thinking more lukewarm :eek: but yes, come to think of it... *duh* good point sir ;)