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pteron
19-09-2005, 13:35
I'm looking for some new thermals and am tempted by the reviews of stuff like smart wool, especially their claim that it doesn't itch. I can't stand ordinary wool (including lambswool) next to my skin so I'm a bit reluctant to shell out loads of money on the smart wool without further recommendation.

So, does anyone use this stuff? Are you normally averse to wearing wool but have found the smart wool type to be OK?

All feedback greatly appreciated...

charliefox
19-09-2005, 13:45
Hi

Didn't know Smartwool did underwear! I have several pairs of their socks which are wonderful - no itch, good moisture transportation and noticeably less smell than synthetic socks - highly recommended :)

As far as thermals go, and here I'm going to incur the wrath of the "thou shalt not worship false idols nor shall thou been seen to be wearing / endorsing the clothes of Mr Mears" brigade, Ulfrotte thermals are excellent. No itch, less smell, very warm etc. etc.

There are quite a few threads on thermals. reviews, preferences etc. Try the search engine - I'm sure that will help with your enquiries.

HTH

P Wren
19-09-2005, 13:49
I'd also be interested in hearing what folk have to say in response to pteron's post.

I may be of to Nepal next year and had Merino Wool base layers recommended. In partucluar those made by 'Icebreaker' seem to have had good reviews. Their stuff is supposed to be very good and itch free - pricey but worth it ?

www.icebreaker.com

PW

Strider
19-09-2005, 14:39
I recently bought a ''body-fit 200'' t-shirt from the icebreaker range and can only speak well of it. I wore it continuously for 4 days during a recent trek in mongolia, and found it to be superior, regarding insulation, to my berghaus etc counterparts. I didnt find it itchy in the slightest and after the four days it didnt even whiff.
They do, however, take longer to dry once wet, but at least they'll keep you warm whilst they're drying.

BlueTrain
19-09-2005, 14:42
I recommend Windsor Wear woolen underwear. It is made in Canada. The lightweight tops are positively silky and I would pick them over any alternative. I haven't tried their bottoms because most long underwear bottoms are way too tight for my taste and I have managed to get by wearing pajama bottoms under my pants. But you didn't want to know that. I wish someone made short sleeved woolen underwear tops and with V-necks.

I don't think there are any Smart Wool undies at the moment. I think they only do socks.

I still use some US Army issue long johns that I was issued in 1965, so clearly I don't wear them that often. They are not pure wool but you probably couldn't find them anyway. Personally, you could probably get away with all-cotton long johns (bottoms only) and pile on something else on top.

pteron
19-09-2005, 15:24
Sorry, should have been clearer!

I see Smartwool as one of the more well known trade names for the new wools coming out of places like New Zealand. There are many names, but they all appear to be a variation on some sort of treated merino wool. Most make the same claim to be non-itchy.

Re the iccebreaker, I was chatting to a guy at my sailing club who has just got back from the Global Challenge - he was on Vaio and said that they all change from Smelly H to Icebreaker and loved it. I didn't twig that it was wool, so negelected to quiz him regarding its itchocity.

I did do a search, but whilst there is lots of info regarding how good it is, I couldn't find anyone who said "I can't wear ordinary lambswool but the merino stuff doesn't make me itch"...

leon-1
19-09-2005, 15:30
I've been using fox river Merino wool socks for years, yes I do find other types of wool next to the skin itchy untill it has been really broken in (which takes a time).

The Merino Stuff is pretty good, no itch yet and that is about ten years on and off that I have been using them.

Rod
19-09-2005, 16:27
I've acquired some Ice Breaker boxers & a long-sleeved top late last year and have been very impressed with them. If anything I found them too warm at times. I appreciate that they are pricey - I blagged mine of one of their reps. :D

I have tried the Smartwool socks - OK for the most part. I still prefer Bridgedale. These are personal observations :)

arctic hobo
19-09-2005, 16:27
As far as thermals go, and here I'm going to incur the wrath of the "thou shalt not worship false idols nor shall thou been seen to be wearing / endorsing the clothes of Mr Mears" brigade, Ulfrotte thermals are excellent. No itch, less smell, very warm etc. etc.
Don't worry about it! Ray Mears is only one person recommending Ulfrotte - it's quite an instution in Scandinavia. I too would heartily recommend it, although I've not used it as much as I'd like.
I personally think that itchy wool is fine because the itch soon goes away. I used to avoid it for that reason, then I found that I just didn't notice it - so now I wear loads of wool :)

addyb
19-09-2005, 16:40
You see, I'm not totally sold on wool. My current baselayer is Helly Hansen improved polypropylene, which is their new "formula." It's silky soft, and because it's "improved" it simply does not stink. I actually find that my Lifa soaks up less BO than my Malden-Mills polartec long-johns.

My thermal layer used to be a fibre-pile jacket, but I've torn a 6 inch vertical hole in it, so that's $120 dollars down the drain. Like I said in an earlier post, I have a brand new wooly-pooly sweater that I've maybe worn only half a dozen times. I'm thinking of using it in lieu of my pile jacket, just because it's so tough.

So, I have two questions to you fellow gear-heads:

How is wool at moisture management?

Is it true what they say about it being useless because it takes a very long time to dry out?

I'm curious!

A.

Schwert
19-09-2005, 17:59
I have a SmartWool long-sleeved top and find it superior to any wool undergarment I have ever used. It has a soft and for me completely non-itchy feel and is vastly better at moisture transfer/heat management than any artificial material longjohn top I have ever worn. It feels dry to wear abd does not stink up. I highly recommend this garment.

I have a quality wool top from Filson also but the SmartWool is superior.

BlueTrain
19-09-2005, 21:58
How could anyone from Seattle not worship Filson?

One writer from a few years ago suggested that one put your long johns on in a cold room to avoid a "shower of perspiration" that otherwise happens. That was not necessarily to avoid an itchy feeling but he said it was always difficult to convert people to wool underwear.

Of course, there is wool and there is wool. But the feel of it is usually an acquired taste, in a manner of speaking.

There is also something called Techno Wool, produced by Woolrich for certain garments but not underwear evidently. Woolrich aren't as wooly as they used to be but I have a pair of their heavy weight wool outdoor pants that are supposed to be washable. Most of their woolen garments still need to be dry cleaned. Pendleton now has some washable wool shirts in their traditional plaid patterns and they are very fine shirts if you don't mind a slightly old-fashioned look.

arctic hobo
19-09-2005, 22:47
How is wool at moisture management?
Excellent - I have never had a wet woolen garment from body moisture.


Is it true what they say about it being useless because it takes a very long time to dry out?
It does take a long time to dry - but there are two advantages. Firstly, it's very hard to get very wet through, unless it's pouring or you hold it underwater. The wool clothes I have stay dry if I fall in a stream, providing I get up again fairly quickly. Also, it doesn't melt by a fire (not like those fancy plastic fibres!), so it's a lot easier to dry.
Oiled wool, as used on fisherman's jerseys, is an absolute B****** to knit (rips your hands to bits) but makes wonderful jumpers - amazingly waterproof, and I would say outperform every synthetic fibre out there. :)

Schwert
20-09-2005, 00:31
This is one of my all time favorite quotes from Alexandra and Garrett Conover's Winter Wilderness Companion

Next time you see a lunch-stop shot in someone’s slide show, you’ll be able to pick out who has what for underwear as if you had X-ray vision. Those flopped comfortably in the snow are probably-wearing layers of wool, and those standing with hunched shoulders and pinched expressions are probably desperately trying to heat up moisture trapped in a layer or two of synthetics.

Each year, news of the latest synthetics is covered exhaustively in outdoor magazines. The outdoor magazine trade is almost entirely funded by advertising contracts with purveyors of synthetics, and few editors are brave enough to offend their backers. Most of what follows concerns the virtues of natural fibers, as they are rapidly being forgotten. A whole generation of outdoor enthusiast has grown up in the age of synthetics and has no way of knowing whether alternatives exist or what they might be.

This has been exactly my feeling about the wonder fabric underwear. The poly stuff does transfer sweat efficiently off my skin but it just lays in a layer on the fabric. My wool tops and especially the SmartWool top just handle the moisture completely differently. The wool does not shimmer in water like poly but holds the damp and keeps it from evaporating so rapidly that it chills me at a rest stop. I used to use the poly tops and bottoms exclusively nordic skiing but changed back to the wool top and have found a real improvement in comfort both when active and when stopped.

I mostly ski in just a long john top then don a windproof and sweater when I stop. The wool top is my hands down favorite. I still wear poly johns under my wool knickers unless it is very cold though. Much less sweat to deal with there but if I owned a SmartWool bottom set I would probably change.

Schwert
20-09-2005, 00:34
How could anyone from Seattle not worship Filson?

Ahh but I do...their wool underwear is great but SmartWool is just better. Filson coats, vests, shirts, sox, bags, all make the grade...but nice as their underwear is the SmartWool is a cut above.

nzgunnie
20-09-2005, 06:33
I hate itchy wool, but Icebreaker does not itch at all. It is marino, and for whatever reason is not at all irritating.

It is a bit expensive, but it can't be beaten, so much more comfortable than polypro or normal wool.

addyb
20-09-2005, 07:11
Well, I think it depends on what you're doing, really, but Schwert, you make a very good case.

I use my Lifa polypropylene simply as a wicking layer. It has next to nothing in the way of warmth, I froze my a** off tonite walking home from work wearing the top.

The whole purpose of a synthetic baselayer is to PASS ON body moisture to the insulation layer (ideally fleece, or fibre pile) where it then moves on to the protection layer, ideally a waterproof/breathable garment such as Ventile or Gore-Tex. It is entirely possible to stay completely dry in a non-breathable garment such as PVC (rubber) rainwear if the proper layering technique is used. This is the whole purpose of synthetic underwear, especially Polypropylene. That is to say:

Synthetic's themselves are plastic, they do not have the ability to 'wick' as cotton and wool do. But, by virtue of the way they are woven, when a human body is working hard, perspiring heavily, it emits out a lot of heat. Synthetic baselayers use this heat to PUSH the moisture away from the body, up towards the other layers, where they then evaporate into the outside air.

If the body is not working hard, there is no heat to move moisture, but because there is no work being done, there is no moisture. As well, synthetics simply do not absorb water. The polymer polypropylene absorbs 0.01% moisture. (Crazy eh?) Polyester absorbs 10% moisture. Compare this to cotton, silk, and wool which can and will absorb 40% water (and more)This makes them heavy, it bogs you down in high-pace activities.

(I asked earlier about how much moisture smartwool absorbs, and I got the answer: "It does take a long time to dry.")

On the negative side, synthetics feel clammy when they are "wicking". Stopping after a high-output activity, your synthetic underwear will feel sticky, but only for a short period of time, a couple minutes at most. As well, they offer little or no insulation value. They have to very thin in order to transfer moisture, so they can't be thick. (But, it is a different case for insulation layers)

Natural's on the other hand, (Well, we all know that using cotton as a baselayer is a surefire way to get hypothermia, so we'll rule out that fabric) such as wool, well....read this thread and decide for yourself!

Ogri the trog
20-09-2005, 07:16
I remember being told....
...that the old fashioned wool garments itched - in order to bring your blood to the skin surface and keep the wearer warm! I suppose that was before research into the cooling effect of bringing blood to a cold skin causing hypothermia!

Your comments have convinced me to try some Smartwool garments!

Ogri the trog

pteron
20-09-2005, 09:18
This is one of my all time favorite quotes from Alexandra and Garrett Conover's Winter Wilderness Companion

<snip>



Schwert, I was reading your review of that book and the quote from it yesterday and it triggered my posting re the smartwool!

steven andrews
20-09-2005, 09:29
Merino is the mutt's nuts.
I initially bought a Howies NBL (natural base layer) 100% Merino Wool long sleeve top to wear as a safe base layer under my firejacket.

They are fantastic and I have not suffered from any itching problems at all.
Howies recently had a sale and I bought two more NBLs for £27.50 each

They only have Small size left now:
Howies NBL (http://www.howies.co.uk/detail2.php?dsn=051MSBNBGRGR)

Lurch
20-09-2005, 11:13
I pretty much exclusively wear smartwool socks and have done for over a year now. They're pretty good and non-itchy, I'm a stinky sweaty footed get and these are great for combating that. I used to be wool phobic but these are no problem for me.
I've also got a number of pairs of the smartwool underskanks, they're great for stopping my chubby thighs rubbing together and no itch. My only reservation is the durability of these. They are thin and light = delicate. I've just chucked my first pair out, but I kinda put my foot through them.

pteron
20-09-2005, 12:12
Merino is the mutt's nuts.
I initially bought a Howies NBL (natural base layer) 100% Merino Wool long sleeve top to wear as a safe base layer under my firejacket.

They are fantastic and I have not suffered from any itching problems at all.
Howies recently had a sale and I bought two more NBLs for £27.50 each

They only have Small size left now:
Howies NBL (http://www.howies.co.uk/detail2.php?dsn=051MSBNBGRGR)

Hey thanks for the link, I'm going to order one of their NBL range to try it out.

BlueTrain
20-09-2005, 14:53
Ahh but I do...their wool underwear is great but SmartWool is just better. Filson coats, vests, shirts, sox, bags, all make the grade...but nice as their underwear is the SmartWool is a cut above.

Although I don't have any of their waxed garments, I have several other Filson items. However, there are other American companies out there making equally fine woolen goods at more reasonable prices (and some even more expensive). Naturally, they are all up North somewhere, probably all in New England or Minnesota. I have a few things from Bimidji that have been more than satisfactory and that's where I buy my Windsor Wear long johns. In addition to their own products they sell other companies things, including Filson.

arctic hobo
20-09-2005, 17:07
(I asked earlier about how much moisture smartwool absorbs, and I got the answer: "It does take a long time to dry.")
That's not quite true mate. If I may quote, you said: "Is it true what they say about it being useless because it takes a very long time to dry out?"
And I replied: "It does take a long time to dry - but there are two advantages. Firstly, it's very hard to get very wet through, unless it's pouring or you hold it underwater. The wool clothes I have stay dry if I fall in a stream, providing I get up again fairly quickly. Also, it doesn't melt by a fire (not like those fancy plastic fibres!), so it's a lot easier to dry."
I actually thought you were talking about real wool there though.


Compare this to cotton, silk, and wool which can and will absorb 40% water (and more)This makes them heavy, it bogs you down in high-pace activities.
That may be true, but under different cirumstances. Cotton very quickly absorbs all your body's moisture. Wool on the other hand absorbs very little indeed. The only way to make wool absorb a lot of water is to wear it in a downpour, or to hold it underwater. Splashes and body moisture do not make wool wet - and that's a fact ;)

Sickboy
20-09-2005, 17:54
I've been lucky enough to try most types of base layer available in the uk, by far the best are those made from merino wool, it is very expensive material to use but it will outlast ALL other materials in any situation, the malden mills polartec range of fabrics use a number of coatings to make them work better (hence a slight waxy feel), fine in warm weather for short periods, but extended trips cause a real drop in performance, a good base layer should be as good on the 5th day as the first, dirt really does effect it.
This is where good quality wool base layers come into there own, they stay servicable far longer and tend not to stink so quickly.
The other draw back i've found with synthetic fabrics (except modern helly hansen) is they tend to lose shape/fit, the lycra tends to stretch a little but the synthetic fibres and seams don't, sure this is the cause but could be wrong :o .
Tried a norwegian army shirt on my last trip from the army surplace, a waste of £10, one of only a few regretable purchases, warm until you sweat then thats it, no wicking, no warmth and took a century to dry :(

arctic hobo
20-09-2005, 20:55
Tried a norwegian army shirt on my last trip from the army surplace, a waste of £10, one of only a few regretable purchases, warm until you sweat then thats it, no wicking, no warmth and took a century to dry :(
Sorry to hear that. The norgee shirt I think is pretty popular on this forum. It is cotton, which is bad news in front of a fire or if you're exercising hard, but it's windproof and warm. Ideal for a chilly morning parade, I hear ;)

addyb
20-09-2005, 21:15
Hobo,

Mmm...you're right about the wool being hard to get wet, and keeping you warm at the same time. But, you said it yourself, it's heavy when wet. I'm a little guy, only 5'9, 120lbs, and I don't really like packing around wet clothes. :p

hee hee

Schwert
21-09-2005, 01:35
I do not find that the SmartWool top gets heavy with sweat at all. I find it is comfortable to wear during high activity when loads of moisture is passing through AND when I stop. If it is cold enough my poly tops soaked surface starts to freeze, but the wool top does not.

Most of the time I am skiing around here where temperatures are quite mild and moisture handling is paramount in my first layer. My wool top is vastly superior to any type of poly top I have ever worn around here. At home (Montana) were it does get quite a bit colder the difference at a rest stop is very noticible. At no time do I feel that the top is soaked like a cotton tee shirt would feel and at no time do I have a layer of liquid water on the surface of my top like I do with a poly top.

These garments are not like a heavy wool sweater that if soaked in prolonged rain gets heavy. That is just not how they tend to work. Moisture is obviously retained by the wool but most seems to pass through as a gas and NOT condense on the outer surface like it does on poly.

If your poly underwear is moving water to insulation layers you are carrying that around anyway.

When skiiing I do not usually have insulation on top of my ski top...either the top alone or the top plus a windproof. When I stop I usually pull a fleece or wool sweater over whatever I am wearing...(top-windproof-sweater) unless the wind is strong when I will take the time to place the windproof on the outside.

The degree to which the SmartWool top has increased my enjoyment of the day is just unbelievable. I would not trade my wool top for anything.

Lesser activities which do not generate as much sweat the top is great too, but for me the high activity--high moisture activities is where this wool top shines. Vastly more comfortable for me than poly.

Same comparison I can make for wool sox vs poly sox...wool always feel much drier and comfortable to me.

I just checked the SmartWool site and I think I am going to have to get a pair of lightweight bottoms for this year. I am not sure if my top is light or mid weight...but I am guessing light.

ChrisKavanaugh
21-09-2005, 03:45
Addressing the question of drying time is subjective. Bushcraft is supposed to be about SLOWING DOWN. How many of us pack microwave ovens? Extreme winter bushcraft always emphasizes spare clothing, aka as clean and dry. It may horrify ultralight advocates and isn't cheap, but I pack spare thermals along with shirts, trousers,socks etc. One set is for active use and the second for sleeping. I've never had a problem with either drying out between shifts.

addyb
21-09-2005, 16:15
No, I'm sorry, you guys are right. Bushcraft IS about "slowing down."

But, I'm simply not a bushcrafter. I'm a climber, here in the Rockies and Coast Range in BC. When I'm not climbing in the winter, I hike in the summer. And when I'm not doing that, I go to college.

I guess that's why I have such a different approach to things when I post, like how modern my mode of thinking is. (The only OLD piece of gear that I own is my Ventile anorak, everything else I wear is synthetic.) And what I really enjoy about this place, is that you guys always offer different opinions to whatever I post, and it's cool because I can use your ideas as a sounding board for my experiences. :)

I'm not one of those those guys that goes out carrying a hundred pound pack, but at the same time I stay very far away from old-fashioned materials because I've seen what can happen to a climber wearing them.

When I was 18, I was on a multi-day hike, in the Fall season. Well, the rain hit us pretty hard, and one of the chaps on the hike was wearing cotton and wool clothing. We were all pretty soaked, but I was okay becaus I had my polypro on. Well we got woken up in the middle of the night because the chap was crying and shivering. My Dad and I got up, and had a look at him, and my Dad said "Holy F*ck, in 30+ years of this, I have NEVER seen a worse case of hypothermia." So I got my stove going, we dumped some hot liquid into him, stripped him, and put him in a sleeping bag between two other chaps. I can't even begin to explain how bad the weather was, there was simply no way to get a fire started, and no time.

Anyway, he made it out alive, and I recall someone saying "If we hadn't got to him when we did, we would've needed a body bag."

To be honest, I still shudder thinking about that, it was a messed up trip. And that experience has made me adament about not wearing gear like that. But then again, that wasn't bushcraft. It was a completely different situation.

A.

gregorach
21-09-2005, 16:37
He was trying to sleep in wet kit? :eek: That's nothing to do with the fabrics themselves - that's just daft. Always carry a dry kit, never sleep in your wet kit. Next you'll be telling me he was wearing jeans inside his bag.

Still, at least he was still shivering...

ChrisKavanaugh
21-09-2005, 17:55
I am acquainted with the editor of a firearms magazine. One of the more 'interesting' queries involved a man complaining about a commercial hunting load failing to fire. It seems our nimrod went to Montana in winter and decided to try his luck early in the morning. I forget what insane sub zero temperature the tent thermometer read, but simple physics kicked in and the primer failed to detonate. My friend questioned why anybody in their right mind would even venture outside to begin with :eek: If a simple chemical unit like a primer can't operate why would a complex chemical unit like a grown man try to? All clothing, all kit in fact has a performance envelope. It doesn't take a mathematical representation on graph paper for us to know when the finest wool made of unborn musk oxen or the latest wonder material from Dow Jones can't give anymore performance. An ETS member from Australia is a member of an ocean kayaking club. I am paraphrasing a very asture comment from their site " Always buy the very best equipment you can, but but never make an outdoor decision based on it's possession alone. " We've strayed a bit from the question of Smartwool itching and drying out, but like randy and My favourite clothing vendor says " might as well have the best" :D

Schwert
21-09-2005, 18:18
addyb,

You may be interested in looking at a short gear review posted at a local mountain shop.

Gear Review by Bart Paull

Just got back from a fast and light two day ascent of Denali's Cassin Ridge. I wore a lot of gear from Pro Mountain Sports, including many Wild Things garments and Smartwool underwear. The Smartwool was definitely the best type of material I have tried for next–to–skin insulation. I also had a Patagonia Capilene top that I used for over 3 weeks on Denali in all types of conditions, comparing it directly to the Smartwool.

The Smartwool shirt wicked much faster and dried much quicker than the Capilene underwear, eliminating the constant clammy feeling I have always associated with Capilene underwear. At the beginning of the trip, I was rotating the layer next to my skin: Smartwool until I sweated and then Capilene until the Smartwool had dried. I soon realized that no leap–frogging was necessary at all. The Smartwool Ziptop dried so quickly that all one needs for basically all conditions is a Smartwool top and a lightweight Wild Things windshirt. Trust me, wool is simply better than capilene for the first layer, end of discussion.

Fast and light ascents, especially in arctic environments, demand maximum efficiency from clothing systems. Trust Jim's advice. Buy the Smartwool and the Primaloft garments, toss the Capilene and fleece, and get hot!

This can be found at Pro Mountain Sports here in Seattle, under "Clothing/SmartWool/Men's Lightweight Crew"

For me, during high activity or for bushcraft a SmartWool top is a better choice than the poly tops. My experience has been very much the same as Bart's.

http://www.promountainsports.com/clothing.shtml


I actually do not see SmartWool johns as Old Technology..but as new technology.

gregorach
21-09-2005, 20:50
Well, I've ordered a 100% Marino top from Howies on the strength of this thread (they are going cheap) - we'll see how it goes...

Honestly, I'm like a woman with a shoe craving sometimes. :)

Schwert
21-09-2005, 21:50
This whole thread gave me the push too. I decided to pick up some SmartWool johns for the season over at Pro Mountain....nice little shop but just one problem.....they were closing out all SmartWool stock at half off.... :D

http://img255.imageshack.us/img255/3412/woolyunders38380ye.jpg

The owner of the shop is moving more towards IceBreaker goods and some new Devold thin wool as he has had some quality issues with SmartWool. I decided to try a thin Ibex top that was also half price and a full-price IceBreaker 200g/m2 short-sleeve top.

I picked up a lightwt and midwt SmartWool bottom and a midwt zip top.

There goes the cash for my next Ingram :eek:

addyb
21-09-2005, 22:38
Schwert,

Thanks for posting the article! I'm going to stop dissing smartwool now, because everyone likes their own kit. I plan on sticking with my Lifa baselayer though, because it works for me, and I'm satisfied with it. If you having something that works for you, then that's all that matters. :)

Smartwool for you, polypropylene for me! Happy hunting!

Adam

Schwert
21-09-2005, 23:01
Adam,

I totally appreciate your choices and preferences as there is a lot of differences in peoples comfort in different locals, different climates and different activities.

My choices in underwear have changed dramatically since I started out...each one getting progressively better with the advent of new materials.

As a kid I used Duofold cotton/wool laminated thermals. As I got more active skiing, climbing, and hiking I switched to cotton net or thick wool (Canadian Black Wool--super itchy), then poly net and Lifa polypro, then on to Patagonia capiliene or Bjyrne poly net which were my choices up until last fall when I found my SmartWool top.

I think the poly changes were dramatically better then the Duofold and cotton net and certainly more comfortable than the thick scratchy wool, but I was absolutely amazed by the feel and efficiency of the new wool.

I think lots of people will not even try the new wool as they are afraid of itch or whatever, but I am very glad I tried it.

pteron
22-09-2005, 12:09
This whole thread gave me the push too. I decided to pick up some SmartWool johns for the season over at Pro Mountain....nice little shop but just one problem.....they were closing out all SmartWool stock at half off.... :D


Do they ship to the UK? :)

Roy's Badger
22-09-2005, 13:14
Got to say, the Ullefrote stuff is tip-top. Got given a set by a bloke with nice hair, and used it on a survival course in Norway. Tried it with undercrackers on first because I worried about the itch factor- what-a-mistake-a-to-make-a. The thermals don't itch at all, but the cotton underpants sure get cold...

Schwert
22-09-2005, 17:51
pteron,

I bought just about everything in the shop. They have a few pieces left in smaller sizes, but I cannot recall exactly what they have. It is such a small shop they may ship stuff over without a lot of hassle. I would recommend you email them and see if any of their remaining stock suits you. If they do not want to ship, just charge the items and I will pick them up and ship them over.

http://www.promountainsports.com/index.html

Check out their shipping page for details and email address.