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drewdunnrespect
18-08-2010, 03:39
as above what would you take?

for instance would would swing amongst the trees or would you live on the ground.
also would you take a tent to store things in and would it be a bell tent so you could use a stove in the winter and sit inthere to do crafts and genraly keep warm and then sleep in a hammock
Now would you take a portable solar shower for instance.

your thoughts and opinions please

drew

JohnC
18-08-2010, 09:41
I'd go for a canvas tent, I'd like a yurt (as I already have one). YOu could still have the option of hammocking when you wanted (assuming trees/fixing points around). I was using a solar shower last week on camp and it was very good, made the difference for keeping clean when loch dipping was just too cold.

Ahjno
18-08-2010, 09:48
If possible I'd take a tipi, as I've seen a few at the Moot and I like them. Add a woodstove (with oven-compartment thingy), kitchen gear (2 pots and frying pan, cheap plate, big kettle (1.5 ltr), decent sleeping bag, camp cot, chair & table, saw & axe and a landy to move it all (think Bushtuckerman, jungle episode).

SimonM
18-08-2010, 10:11
If possible I'd take a tipi, as I've seen a few at the Moot and I like them. Add a woodstove (with oven-compartment thingy), kitchen gear (2 pots and frying pan, cheap plate, big kettle (1.5 ltr), decent sleeping bag, camp cot, chair & table, saw & axe and a landy to move it all (think Bushtuckerman, jungle episode).

All the above and my mega tarp (4.5 x 4.5m polycotton) to give me a sheltered outdoor space for fire wood etc.

Simon

Melonfish
18-08-2010, 11:20
build a cabin? use logs, wicker, wattle and daub and laud it over the tent types. you do have a year after all.

Neumo
18-08-2010, 11:45
I would build a semi-permanent structure if I could not take a yurt. Something like a log cabin or a bender would be good, as well as having a bell tent with a heater in it.

J4C3
18-08-2010, 12:08
Large Tarp x2 one to cover the whole camp ,other for an angled wall when needed
Hammock+ hammock tarp,self inf mat,sleeping bag for most sleeps
Bivi bag for when you fancy a change
Tent as you say for poor weather and for storage
Ground tarp for poor weather to place on the floor,once mud over everything youll soon get fed up,also you can wrap your kit or bergen in it at night ,id also use a folding german mat to add padding keeping the cold out or used as a seat
Id take so much cord its unreal
cooking wise billys cans+honey stove is a must as just a few twigs can be enough heat up some food or drink,so even when its worst case you can get a warm meal,various burners so the honey stove will take any fuel
a folding grill to put over an open fire

DEFFO a travel tap bottle,some platy folding botttles and maybe a large folding 10litre camping type

waterproofs ,good knife and back up,machete as id like to make some shelter even if its only a back wall lean too and a bench seat

shovel and kit for semi perm toilet area ,folding bowl and solar shower



for a longer duration youll have to be fairly spoiled or youll get fed up and jack it in,if you have the freedom time to take a year out to do so then go for it,im sure itll be very tough at times but something youll recall for the rest of your days,a lot may depend on if you plan to travel at all or stick it out in one location

Dave Budd
18-08-2010, 12:21
I would make myself a shelter from hazel and a large cheap tarp or two, just like these two 'sheds' I've built in my woods ;)

http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i98/buddknives1/shed1.jpg
this is 4m long, 2.5m wide and the same high and only needed a dozen or so poles plus two tarps (one is an old knackered one) and a bit of string. It does also have a door now, this was a mid-construction photo.

http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i98/buddknives1/shelter2la.jpg
this is about 5m diameter at the base and has a fire in the middle

I've got an army matress to sleep on and I've been out in teh round one all through the winter snug as a bug :) Sadly it has fallen apart now (it took a day to make and was a temporary job 4 years ago), so I'll be trying the bender out this year ;)

sandsnakes
18-08-2010, 12:24
I would take two very large industrial sized tarps and make a more permanent structure, possibly with low turf walls, a basic round house. 1 tarp would be an under layer for the roof, which I would cover with braken and pinelimbs as insulation. Small hole in top for a fire vent. Build a sleeping platform and cover the floor with wood chips which would soon mount up. Use the secont tarp outside as a cover for work area and keeping wood supplies dry.

Beyond that starndard walking kit two of everything, some plastic bins to make soap, solar shower, bivvi bag, issue tarp, sleeping bag. lots of reading material on a pad with solar charger. oh yes send a note in black to the ex saying I have died and shut down the bank account :rolleyes:

Sharps, well kurkri, felling axe, churi and spare cheap knives, i would go for a bunch of Cold Steel Finn Bear about half a dozen as you never know when you are going to damage or break kit.
Lots of wire for traps.

Oh, a few claymore mines and a shovel for the bodies!:lmao:


Sandsnakes... er, um, when can i go?
Thats about it

Doc
18-08-2010, 12:31
In winter moisture accumulates in clothing and sleeping bags. You really need a heated tent/yurt to stay comfortable in the longer run.

BarryG
18-08-2010, 14:04
All the above and my mega tarp (4.5 x 4.5m polycotton) to give me a sheltered outdoor space for fire wood etc.

Simon

Totally with you on that! All the above, and id throw in a decsent grill for over the fire, a spade and bog roll, loads and loads of bog roll.

Davey569
18-08-2010, 14:11
I think I would take a large tipi and woodburner, a tarp for outside to go over a table set. and then apart from food the basics such as a good axe, saw, rope, and a nice campbed ofcourse.

gregorach
18-08-2010, 14:22
Build a bender. It's the traditional structure for exactly this sort of thing in the UK.

MSkiba
18-08-2010, 14:48
car battery, microwave, USB broadband, laptop and fridge/freezer!

Puchal
18-08-2010, 15:09
I would build canvas wall tent, with wood burner stove.
One of those that Guy Grieve used in Alaska interior, before he finished his cabin.
Polish traveler, and expert on Mongolia has been speaking very highly about such tents used by his friend and guide - Erdene.
It offers comfort in hight (you can easily stand in it), and you can set up wood burner with chimney without safety concerns (roof must be equiped with special metal ring, securing canvas from burning).
If you plan to use it for a year, building a floor or indoor platform from wooden logs would definitely increase comfort and help you to stay dry, even during heavy showers.
http://store.imaginechildhood.com/images/products/detail/mountainman1.jpg

EddBamber
18-08-2010, 15:28
I'd take a teepee because they look awesome and you could have a fire in the centre, i'd either cook on an open fire or a hobo style cooker.

Shewie
18-08-2010, 15:41
If I knew I was going to be out for a long stretch I'd have a go at the bender or the full on Dick Proenneke cabin thing.

First item on my kit list would be the wife though, just for the washing, ironing and cooking etc.

locum76
18-08-2010, 18:11
I'd take swmblt, a small wood fueled still, a tonne of baked beans, 12 legs of jamon serrano, a ruddy great wig wam and a double bass.

andy_e
18-08-2010, 18:26
... First item on my kit list would be the wife though,

Aww isn't that sweet, she'll be glad you're thinking of her ...


... just for the washing, ironing and cooking etc.

Ah! Hope she has a sense of humour Rich ;-)

ged
18-08-2010, 19:01
My big machete, a great big clean-burning wood stove and some insulated flue pipes.

drewdunnrespect
18-08-2010, 20:08
cheers guys you have given me alot to think about and the reason i say that is i was thinking using my hammock and my 5m bell tent as a combo because if i can find some wood to do it in and my boss lets me wash my uniform at work i am seriously continplating doing it

dr jones
18-08-2010, 21:52
For 1 year id go with building a bender again , wood burning stove is a must and a couple of recycled windows . Very cozy and suprizingly strong . With the added bonus of being able to add extra rooms /space if you need it !

R.Lewis
18-08-2010, 22:07
Sounds like a plan there... Bender all the time, can make very snug. Remember winter is the deciding factor and a well built bender will insulate and give better heating then any tent can manage. look at some of the permaculture sites or this guy that lives in his self built house in wales. Forgot names/sites etc. Been a session done ta pub... Try and remembers tomorrow.

Robbi
18-08-2010, 22:52
could someone explain what a bender structure is please, piccys would help ! ( i think i know but would like confirmation :) )

cheers

Robbi

bearbait
19-08-2010, 03:13
I think the answer to the question is largely dependent on where you are living/plan to live: Tropical or Temperate Rainforest, Boreal Forest, Desert, Savannah, etc., whether on mountain or lowland, and also the presence or otherwise of predators such as bear or lion, and other such problematic critters such as snakes, ants, scorpions and other pesky members of the insect world. What you need for shelter needs to keep you warm, dry and safe in your "theatre" and the same applies to your food: it needs to be safe from theft by two-/four-/six-/eight-/multi-legged creatures and spoilage from excess heat or cold or moisture. You also need to consider water collection/capture/purification/storage. Also fuel for heating/cooking. And what to do with ALL your waste products. Consider also tools, first aid kit/medicines. If you're not going completely back to nature you may consider a windgen and/or solar panels for electricity or recharging your MP3 player. And are you commuting each day from your camp to your job in telesales/truck driver/police officer/nurse (i.e. do you need to iron a clean shirt each day?) or have you gone bush? How are you going to get mail/pay bills/read BCUK?

I think a more specific question may elicit more helpful or useful responses?

drewdunnrespect
19-08-2010, 09:12
well in regards to your post bear bait i still live with the rents so no bills as such and the car would be sold and i would by a mountain bike to ride to work cos the woods i plan to use is a five minute ride from home and a ten minuite ride from work and i work nights at a hotel anyway so i could use the hotel laundry to wash and ion uniform (thats if the boss lets me of course). Now inregards to reading bcuk well i was planning regular trips to the antys or mum and dads plus to the local tescos and town and what not. to upload photos and also catch up on bcuk and what not but spending the majority of my time i.e sleeping and genral living outdoors cos thats the idea and also to build a camp were i will be comfortable using mostly what i find in the woods

JohnC
19-08-2010, 09:59
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f278/Johnnyvariety/loo1.jpg

Our luxury loos at camp last week...

http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f278/Johnnyvariety/tent1.jpg

Joe looking less than pleased at my tent...

drewdunnrespect
19-08-2010, 10:12
now thats what i am talking about its looking good johnc

gregorach
19-08-2010, 10:44
could someone explain what a bender structure is please, piccys would help ! ( i think i know but would like confirmation :) )

cheers

Robbi

Well, a bender is pretty much anything built from bent poles (usually hazel or willow) covered with canvas or tarpaulin (or carpet, or whatever else you've got to hand). They can be all sorts of shapes, but the most common are tunnels and domes. Some are open-fronted to take advantage of an open fire, but mostly people put woodstoves in them. Pallets for the floor if you can get them.

This one (http://www.devon.gov.uk/index/learning/supporting-children/travellers_education/services-2/ta_images/bender_tent.htm) is very spiffy, but this (http://www.travelblog.org/Photos/189084) is perhaps more typical...

dr jones
19-08-2010, 20:44
As with most things , the more effort and time you spend on the construction the more rewarding the finished bender will be.

Robbi
19-08-2010, 20:54
thanks Dunc, that first one looks the biz !!

Jolyon
19-08-2010, 21:01
a tonne of baked beans, .

i wont visit thanks....;-)

Dave B.... i hope your not expecting us to live in that on the knief course!...

Drew I would take clay and slap it in to large rectangle squares maybe use a mold?... build these into a slab and burry with a large fire.... after a few days dig them up and then using maybe a lime mortar put them ontop of each other.... i think you see where i am going.

If your staying for a year it ius a permenant structure your after.... it is the conclusion of the ages...... dont knock the ancestors.....

BTW Gregorach..... wow!

Radix lecti
19-08-2010, 21:11
For me i would like to live outside for a year in a Yurt, i just love the look of them. Here is a link to some. No connection to seller.

http://www.mongolianyurts.co.uk/index.html

drewdunnrespect
19-08-2010, 23:15
thanks for the replys sofar guys but does haaving a permenant structure not deviate form bushy style living which is the idea by hind the year of living out side

JonathanD
19-08-2010, 23:32
thanks for the replys sofar guys but does haaving a permenant structure not deviate form bushy style living which is the idea by hind the year of living out side

I would have thought the construction of a permanent structure would have been one of the main priorities of bushcraft living in a temperate climate.

drewdunnrespect
20-08-2010, 01:53
yes okay jonno but a benda doesnt seem very bushcrafty and also a log cabin is out of the question cos you need planning permission and well i dont own the woods to start with

southey
20-08-2010, 02:09
you don't need planning permission for a shed to store some of your tools in, shead can be quite comfy and look remarkably like log cabins.

wizard
20-08-2010, 03:18
I would think some sort of rodent control. They get into everything in short order.

Noddy
20-08-2010, 10:03
...............

Bushwhacker
20-08-2010, 10:34
Start off with sleeping on the floor then maybe under a tarp, then a tent, then a bigger tent, then a yurt, then a cabin, then a stone-walled shelter, maybe a bungalow, a 2 storey house ............... with a garden............ plumb in a water supply and some gas and wire in some electric.

Timbo
20-08-2010, 17:32
dutch oven, large tarp, one of those carp fishing camp chair bed things for sitting and sleeping on

nevetsjc80
20-08-2010, 17:51
a brunette or a redhead!

Rabbitsmacker
20-08-2010, 21:41
a brunette or a redhead!

thats more the way my thinking was going! lurve shack!

drewdunnrespect
21-08-2010, 02:26
guys i love the love shack idea but can we be sensible cos i am really considering doing this and if i get a job as a farm hand i will be doing it permenantly drew

Trev
21-08-2010, 02:37
Heyho ,
If you are going to do it then you need somewhere secure for your sharps whilst you are at work . I don't know what , Small chest buried with a lift lid cover ?
Cheers , Trev .

1234
21-08-2010, 03:04
what about a summer house, essentially a shed with big windows
something along these lines http://www.waltons.co.uk/waltons-helios-summer-houses
i know its not as bushy as you would like. but its as close to cabinish as your going to get yet still be easier to put up and take down so it not as permanent

im currently living in one at the end of my parents garden, i use there kitchen bathroom etc but i spend most of my time in it when im at home ( it does have electricity wired up though, nothing you couldn't do with a small generator)

1234
21-08-2010, 03:08
there's a fella on youtube who shows you how to make a long term shelter if you want something more bushy

there's 7 parts
heres the first, and the others are linked on the side etc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-xxmNzlCdc

Matt.S
21-08-2010, 03:59
guys i love the love shack idea but can we be sensible cos i am really considering doing this and if i get a job as a farm hand i will be doing it permenantly drew

I'm in a similar situation.

Speaking with a couple people who have done this, sanitation and food storage are the main concerns. Washing becomes awkward when you have to heat the water over wood first, so a solar shower or some sort of dedicated water-heater might be of some use. I expect a woodstove to also be a good investment -- more efficient and controllable than an open fire. Also makes it easier to heat your shelter. This would be especially useful in winter, and for drying washed clothes. Consider the issue of rats very carefully.

drewdunnrespect
21-08-2010, 08:01
cheers matt for that info and how have you gone about trying to find a farmer to take you on

treadlightly
21-08-2010, 21:59
Dave,

I have a similar set up to the teepee you had but struggle managing the smoke from an open fire in the middle. There is a hole at the apex but i find it gets very smoky inside apart from three foot or so above the ground. What do you burn? Wood or charcoal? or do you have a stove with chimney? Any tips on how to improve the draught would be appreciated.


I would make myself a shelter from hazel and a large cheap tarp or two, just like these two 'sheds' I've built in my woods ;)

http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i98/buddknives1/shed1.jpg
this is 4m long, 2.5m wide and the same high and only needed a dozen or so poles plus two tarps (one is an old knackered one) and a bit of string. It does also have a door now, this was a mid-construction photo.

http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i98/buddknives1/shelter2la.jpg
this is about 5m diameter at the base and has a fire in the middle

I've got an army matress to sleep on and I've been out in teh round one all through the winter snug as a bug :) Sadly it has fallen apart now (it took a day to make and was a temporary job 4 years ago), so I'll be trying the bender out this year ;)

gunnix
21-08-2010, 22:38
Lived a year in a Sioux tipi in the Swedish wilderness and would happily do it again. The tipi was beautiful to live in and the evenings lying by the campfire were just splendid :campfire:. Sleeping on a bag filled with hay with reindeer skins on top and a Nanok Endurance -10 plus some woolen blankets inside it was warm as toast during the "endless" Swedish winter. The synthetic sleeping bag had the great advantage over the down sleeping bags that it's easy to keep dry in a tent. Cooking on the open fire quickly became routine and didn't take a lot of time, plus was a lot of fun. Baked flat bread just on a grill about every day, tasted great... smoked bread! Speaking of food I enjoyed bacon a lot, sometimes the whole box under the sleeping platform was filled with it :cool:. But ofcourse nothing could beat the freshly caught fish from the lake, fried with a bit of salt and butter.

http://users.skynet.be/six/vzw_vrije_aarde/oktober%20350.jpg

Whatever you do, keep it simple, better to take less then you need and make some improvisations then haul an awfull lot of stuff with you in the wilderness. A good quality tipi, an engineered stone fireplace, floor of boughs, some pots, a sleeping bag, reindeer skin and enough bacon will get you a long way. Oh, and I forgot to mention the trustworthy axe. Cut cords of firewood and most importantly have that bit of extra confidence to fight the nightly demons when it sleeps by your side. ;)

British Red
21-08-2010, 22:46
yes okay jonno but a benda doesnt seem very bushcrafty and also a log cabin is out of the question cos you need planning permission and well i dont own the woods to start with

You need planning permission regardless if you want to live there for a year

drewdunnrespect
21-08-2010, 23:29
i thought that would be the case BR

British Red
21-08-2010, 23:38
Yeah its nuts but there is a limit to the number of days you can overnight in even your own woodland - even sleeping under a tarp!

wingstoo
21-08-2010, 23:45
Just a few pictures of a shelter that is still standing after 5 years, doesn't look quite so good now after the snow of last winter.

Made from tarps and timber.

Wings

http://ludlowsurvivors.bravehost.com/myPictures/New+Shelter1.jpg

http://ludlowsurvivors.bravehost.com/myPictures/New+Shelter7.jpg

http://ludlowsurvivors.bravehost.com/myPictures/New+Shelter5.jpg

British Red
21-08-2010, 23:50
Pretty sure there was a floor in there eventually :)

wingstoo
21-08-2010, 23:55
Pretty sure there was a floor in there eventually :)

And a carpet with a wood burner gas bottle stove at the back, lights from rechargable batteries, no TV or computer points though. I'll look for the floor photo's if they want them.

Wings

wingstoo
22-08-2010, 00:00
http://upload4.postimage.org/624837/newfloor5.jpg

There you go, floor in, stove at the back, 12v light and a paraffin lantern on the centre post.

But it did cost over £200 to build

Wings

British Red
22-08-2010, 00:12
I seem to remember gravity fed water too :)

gunnix
22-08-2010, 00:17
That looks great Winstoo! Here's the inside of the tipi to show just another alternative:
http://users.skynet.be/six/vzw_vrije_aarde/tipibinnen.JPG

Floor made of 6 inch wood shavings covered with boughs and then some carpets to lie on next to the fire.

PS: That's the sleeping platform for visitors, normally used as a bench, this does not show the bed used all year.

wingstoo
22-08-2010, 00:19
I seem to remember gravity fed water too :)

Just for you Red, the 100ltr water tank for the washing up, I don't think there is a picture of the toilet block and wash-up sink, or the gas hob :p

http://upload4.postimage.org/624811/watertank.jpg

drewdunnrespect
22-08-2010, 01:30
nice going wing stoo how long did that take to build

wingstoo
22-08-2010, 09:33
It was a bit of an ongoing project, but the shelter took a couple of days to get the basic set up ready, floor took a couple of days as well, but that one is huge, something like 16ft diameter, and had 6 or more people in there with kit for two or three days, so for one or two people you can make it half that size.

Wings

drewdunnrespect
22-08-2010, 11:15
cooool wings cheers for that

Satyr
23-08-2010, 11:44
A few years back there was a guy who let his flat go and slept out in a bivy bag for a year on the outskirts of London. I can't find the article at the moment. He would eat in the city before getting the tube out (I think it was Epping forest area). Then he would get in early and take a shower at work (lucky they had one).

He did it as an experiment and saved himself a fortune in rent and bills and I think he was planning a second year to get a deposit on a house.

If you are going to be working on a farm, see if they will offset some wages against board and lodge? Not so bushy but pretty practical.

dr jones
23-08-2010, 20:59
Id be inclined to be prepared to draw up a document ( that youve signed ) stating that youll leave the land you occupy when you or your employer decide to part company , you might find that geeting a farming job easier than geeting them to agree to you building and living on their land especially the kind of shelters youre thinking about using ! ( less broad minded farmers will instantly think that you will shortly be joined by other travellers intent on setting up a community )

drewdunnrespect
24-08-2010, 19:17
yes good idea doc would never have thought of that but it makes total sense thanks

Dave Budd
24-08-2010, 20:06
Dave,

I have a similar set up to the teepee you had but struggle managing the smoke from an open fire in the middle. There is a hole at the apex but i find it gets very smoky inside apart from three foot or so above the ground. What do you burn? Wood or charcoal? or do you have a stove with chimney? Any tips on how to improve the draught would be appreciated.

ah yes that old chestnut :lmao: it's a case of making sure that your wood is dry and well seasoned and then having the vent at the top large enough ;) In my 'limpet' the top has a 3 foot diameter hole (where the tarps on the sides meet), then pulled across that is a small tarp in a kinda chinaman's hat arrangement. If there is no breeze then the hat needs lifting to allow enough draw, but normally the smoke only fills the top foot or so.

The limpet is sadly no more, after three and a half years the birch poles in it's construction were getting brittle and working through the tarps. But is only took me a couple of afternoons to put the thing up on my own (I had a hand with the tarps, but have refitted them solo too) and it has managed some very nasty rain and snow. The raised fireplace in the middle provided heat and light very well and I've been out there with snow on the ground whilst teaching (it also saved a good number of gatherings before I had any other covered spaces!)

http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i98/buddknives1/limpetfire.jpg
http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i98/buddknives1/limpetsm.jpg
the bottom picture shows the top sheet tethered down against the strong winds we had last october/november, but when I had groups in I would move the securing ropes to hold it out and allow a little air underneath

forestwalker
25-08-2010, 05:29
I'd go for a tipi/lavuu or a yurt (modified to be more pointy if the snow/rain was expected to be heavy). Or the classic "cabin" style tent. My experience with tipis in Sweden is that rain will run down the poles and make things wet inside as well. Unfortunately, because I like them a lot.

Burbidge
25-08-2010, 10:43
Search 'the treehouse diaries' on google. Interesting idea?

treadlightly
25-08-2010, 11:44
Thanks Dave, Mine is about eight foot or so at the apex and I think the hole is probably too small. Also my fire was on the ground not on a raised grate. Some adjustments needed, I think.



ah yes that old chestnut :lmao: it's a case of making sure that your wood is dry and well seasoned and then having the vent at the top large enough ;) In my 'limpet' the top has a 3 foot diameter hole (where the tarps on the sides meet), then pulled across that is a small tarp in a kinda chinaman's hat arrangement. If there is no breeze then the hat needs lifting to allow enough draw, but normally the smoke only fills the top foot or so.

The limpet is sadly no more, after three and a half years the birch poles in it's construction were getting brittle and working through the tarps. But is only took me a couple of afternoons to put the thing up on my own (I had a hand with the tarps, but have refitted them solo too) and it has managed some very nasty rain and snow. The raised fireplace in the middle provided heat and light very well and I've been out there with snow on the ground whilst teaching (it also saved a good number of gatherings before I had any other covered spaces!)

http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i98/buddknives1/limpetfire.jpg
http://i70.photobucket.com/albums/i98/buddknives1/limpetsm.jpg
the bottom picture shows the top sheet tethered down against the strong winds we had last october/november, but when I had groups in I would move the securing ropes to hold it out and allow a little air underneath

JohnC
25-08-2010, 11:56
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f278/Johnnyvariety/kitchen1.jpg

Don't forget a kitchen, we've started using this I made from plans from http://blueskykitchen.com/plans.html made a big difference for 4 of us grubbing around in a yurt at cooking and meal times.

Tadpole
25-08-2010, 12:25
Not to put a downer on anyone’s dreams but having lived ‘rough’ for 18 months as a younger man, I will say in the UK, your main problem will not be space or warmth it will be damp. Unless you plan to heat your ‘shelter in the woods’ all the time, everything you own, everything you do, every item of clothing will, after about 10 day, start to be affected by damp. I lived in a largish tent for the summer months, and a shed through autumn, before spending 10 months in an abandoned tea room. And I can say without a doubt that damp was the main problem. I spent most of my time, when not working, scrounging wood for heating, and drying my bedding kit. (Didn’t have a leak, it was just damp)
I’ve say you need a permanent solid building of some kind with a woodburner for heat, something that you can safely leave lit, even when you’re not there. I’d try and find a local farmer that would let you rent an open area, close/next to your woodland. It has to be open so your tent/yurt/shed can dry out in the wind. Build a yurt (you can get a 12ft one for under £1300) fit a decent wood stove. Buy a couple of tonne of dry wood, and Bob’s your mother’s brother. YMMV

treadlightly
25-08-2010, 14:17
I'd go for a tipi/lavuu or a yurt (modified to be more pointy if the snow/rain was expected to be heavy). Or the classic "cabin" style tent. My experience with tipis in Sweden is that rain will run down the poles and make things wet inside as well. Unfortunately, because I like them a lot.

I had that problem too. Solved it (at least temporarily) by sticking a large umbrella-type canopy over the top. So far it has survived some strong winds so we'll see how it goes through the winter.

southey
26-08-2010, 04:49
If you havent already, this thread (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=25876&highlight=woodburner)might be worth a read matey.

drewdunnrespect
26-08-2010, 06:29
cheers southey and yes i had already read it its sort of what started the idea for my adventure if you can call it that

gunnix
27-08-2010, 20:55
I'd go for a tipi/lavuu or a yurt (modified to be more pointy if the snow/rain was expected to be heavy). Or the classic "cabin" style tent. My experience with tipis in Sweden is that rain will run down the poles and make things wet inside as well. Unfortunately, because I like them a lot.

Just put an inner tent in it which goes up over two metres high so it covers all of the sleeping area and more. The only thing getting wet this way is the fireplace and a small area around it, and that dries up quickly ;)

As Tadpole mentions dampness is indeed the biggest problem, definately in colder climates... I found it's possible to keep out the dampness, but you can't imagine how much wood was required to accomplish that in the tipi.

As long as you steer away from cotton... Wool and synthetics do the trick.

bearbait
28-08-2010, 22:57
Some years ago I came across the story of a couple who had little money but needed a home They bought two polytunnels, one sized to fit inside the other. They filled the space between with insulation. A cheap and well-insulated home. Of course you'd have condensation problems but this is managable. Similarly with heating. I guess it's a bit like one bender inside another with the gap insulated!

nuggets
28-08-2010, 23:09
ventilation is important as well as insulation , my bed roll turned green mouldy after three weeks in a tent !!!

OhCanada
29-08-2010, 00:47
This Canadian has already done it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4_fteTJQ_Q

drewdunnrespect
29-08-2010, 18:58
hiya guys thanks for your impput but i have decided a against a static camp and am now looking at the possibility of having to move around due to really struggling to find a farmer and land also traveling sounds fun as well.

drew

Norton
18-11-2010, 19:54
This Canadian has already done it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i4_fteTJQ_Q

He reckons they weren't naive going in then tells us they discovered that living in a couple would be considered punishment it was that difficult, I worked that out myself within a few minutes of thinking about it, they planned that trip for eighteen months. And the bit about the drinking water, seven months they suspected it, I realise they may not have boiled the water 500 years ago but people probably learned quite quickly to set up by flowing water. I'm glad they enjoyed what they did and got fulfilment from it, and I've also enjoyed watching it, but they went in there with a romantic notion that they would be okay and it was as much luck as skill and knowledge that saw them survive.

On a smaller scale you should remember that Drew, living outside is life in itself a lot of the time and if you start trying to fit work round it as well you could find yourself very tired very quickly. Finishing at 5 in the winter and then having to get a fire lit in the dark before you can even have a cuppa could be very wearing.

I realise you plan on still partaking of some of the trappings of modern life and I think you should never underestimate the ability of Mum's Sunday roast and a warm bed now and again to raise your spirits.

Good luck if you decide to go through with it.

sandbender
18-11-2010, 21:40
"...as above what would you take?...your thoughts and opinions please..."

As little as possible carried in as small a pack as I could get away with, I would step out my front door on January first and see just how far my feet could carry me in three hundred and sixty five days.

However if you really must stay in the one place (in the UK) and your happy that your camp will be safe from thieves and brigands, then a yurt is the way to go. Warm in winter and cool in the summer, very cosy.

Dan Kuehn's excellent book 'Mongolian Cloud Houses (http://www.shelterpub.com/_mongolian/MCH-book.html)' has a chapter available to view online, you may browse through it here (http://www.shelterpub.com/_home_work/_mongolian/mongolian_188-189.html).

:)

Oarsnpaddle
19-11-2010, 02:26
I'd do the whole British campaign furniture shebang, although I'd have a modern paraffin/diesel heater and hot-shower if possible - and a single pole lavvu. It's too wet to not have easy, dry heat for such a long period. but if I couldn't get diesel where I was, a big heavy wood stove would do.

http://www.britishcampaignfurniture.c om/

But, really, if I'm tenting, I don't want to be in the same place for a year.