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pitta-pitta
20-12-2009, 13:33
For hunting, camping, batoning. I'd like to buy something more than just an average woodlore. Any suggestions? Happy to pay £200+

brancho
20-12-2009, 14:09
I recomend a nice custom Scandi pair of knives for that money to cover all bases. Or you could get a pretty dmascus blade.

pitta-pitta
20-12-2009, 14:29
Any particular makers worth checking out?

TeeDee
20-12-2009, 14:44
Any particular makers worth checking out?

Suggest you check out all the old post from this ' Edged Tool' section , there are loads of quality makers on here who make knives as a hobby and a way of living.

I would be tempted to put up some names for you to check out their work but i would surely miss someone so will refrain.

Just my opinion , £200+ will get you a lot of knife , but £100 will get you a very similiar knife and dare i say it just as good.


Strongly suggest you start going through all the posts in 'Makers Market'


HTH & Good luck!!

TD

Chris the Cat
20-12-2009, 14:47
Loads!
Guy Stainthorp and our own Dave Budd to name just two!
Take your time and have a good look around and ask them lots of questions!!
You can get alot of knife for that money so don't rush it!!
Good luck!
Chris.

pitta-pitta
20-12-2009, 15:02
Thanks. Very helpful. Will do as you suggest. Any other makers worth a look anyone wants to suggest. I'll take my time like you say. I want to get this right. I keep seeing Bernie Garland and Stuart Mitchells names what are there knives like? Anyone got one? I like the look of some of Hill Bills too? Any opinons? All help gratefully received.

tobes01
20-12-2009, 15:11
Got a Bernie Garland bushcrafter and little whittler, and they're fab - I'm sure others can make to his quality, but you'd be daft not to give him serious consideration.

If I weren't a BG addict, I'd probably give the Spyderco some serious consideration.

Tobes

Celt_Ginger
20-12-2009, 15:13
I can recommend Bernie Garland Knives through personal use. His B&T is very good. Hillbills knives do look good as well. FYGT is another good maker. I have one of his too.

pitta-pitta
20-12-2009, 15:14
Thanks. I do like the look of Bernie Garlands stuff. So your not so keen on Stuart Mitchell then?

Chris the Cat
20-12-2009, 15:15
Have you handled many top end (ish!) Knives pitta-pitta?
Mr Mitchells knives are top class and his reputation is second to none.
But as Tee-Dee said there are many good makers and it hard to mention one good one with out mentioning some of the others! ( Well it is for me,as I am a collecter as well as a user!)
All I would say is that maybe a trip to one of the shows ( buy a Mora to keep you going!!) and get to meet some of the makers and handle some of the knives!!
I know I wish I had done that before buying my first £200+ knife!
My best.
Chris.

brancho
20-12-2009, 15:18
I recomend looking through various threads and pick a style you like and maker whos stuff you like and go with that. Have a look in makers sales as well as some knives are only shown there. Once you have a style in mind pick a maker that will do that for your price range.

For that money something nice is out there.

Chris the Cat
20-12-2009, 15:19
Stu Mitchell familty have been 'little mesters' in the Sheffield cutlery industry for generations.
Top of his game,and you should look at his work.
Are you a member of British Blades? ( although I think Stuart is a member here as well!?)

Draven
20-12-2009, 15:19
My four favourites are a Bernie Garland blade, an Enzo Nordic 95, a Brusletto Sameblad and a E. Jonsson Mora, all handled by myself; none of the blades you could go wrong with:

http://neo-thought.parallel-worlds.net/comp.jpg

From top to bottom is the Leuku, BG knife, Mora and Enzo. The Leuku blade costed £20 + £3 for the handle, I was quoted £50 for the BG blade but we settled on a labour exchange instead + £20 for the dyed curly birch handle, the Mora was £12 and the handle wood was free and the Enzo was about £60 as a kit.

I assume you're after a completed knife though, in which case I'd recommend Bernie Garland or EnZo (google for 'brisa'). Naturally, Enzo doesn't do custom work, but they might have something you like anyway. If you like a bigger knife, the Brusletto/Stromeng Sameblad/Leuku is your friend, though I found that the grind was too obtuse so I raised it on the grinder. I'm pretty sure that all of those can be had within your price range.

Pete

Celt_Ginger
20-12-2009, 15:21
Thanks. I do like the look of Bernie Garlands stuff. So your not so keen on Stuart Mitchell then?

I've not handled or used one of Stuart Mitchel's knives so I can't comment on them. I did email him about a custom build a number of years ago and he never replied, so it kind of put me off a bit. His knives look quite nice though, I'll give him that.

tobes01
20-12-2009, 15:38
For hunting, camping, batoning. I'd like to buy something more than just an average woodlore. Any suggestions? Happy to pay £200+

What do you own at the moment?

If you've not got your own knife yet, then I'd urge you to splurge ten quid on a Mora, and use that to find out what you do and don't like/want.

My first knife was a nice Kellam Puuko, but I didn't feel comfortable about battening with it (I suspect it would be fine). That was £60 down. Then I bought a Fallkniven TK1. Wonderful knife, but I found the handle had too many 'hot spots' for me, so that went. Total £300 down so far. Then an 'Old Oak' bushcrafter, very pleasant but unremarkable. £500 down now. Finally got the BG knife.

That's a whole lot of money wasted (OK, so got some back when I sold them) when I would have been able to bypass the expense had I figured out what I really wanted in the first place.

Anyway, the point is if you don't have a knife yet, get the Mora pdq and have a play. Then decide what you really want.

brancho
20-12-2009, 15:57
My first knife was a nice Kellam Puuko, but I didn't feel comfortable about battening with it (I suspect it would be fine).

You could batton with that until the cows come home.

everthing Draven has shown will do an admirable job I need to get a handle on my Enzo nordic
I was sad to put THIS (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=50202)in the post.

rancid badger
20-12-2009, 16:46
Thanks. Very helpful. Will do as you suggest. Any other makers worth a look anyone wants to suggest. I'll take my time like you say. I want to get this right. I keep seeing Bernie Garland and Stuart Mitchells names what are there knives like? Anyone got one? I like the look of some of Hill Bills too? Any opinons? All help gratefully received.

I really like Bernies work;I made the sheath myself for this one;)

http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x125/stalch/P3120008.jpg

http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x125/stalch/P3270007.jpg


This is a picture of my knife and one Bernie made for my brother below it:
http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x125/stalch/burners/P2230017.jpg

On the strength of the knife I own, I'd buy again and happily recommend Bernies work. In my experience; He's also good to deal with and talk to.

atb

R.B.

tobes01
20-12-2009, 17:04
One thing to think about carefully is your sharpening skills: if you aren't able to sharpen properly then you'll quickly stuff a good blade such as Bernie's. Once again, you should learn on a cheap one like a Mora.

I had Bernie make one with a straighter blade for me since I wasn't comfortable I could maintain the edge on a knife with more of a belly on it. Think I'm getting better now, but I'm very happy with the one I have.

pitta-pitta
20-12-2009, 17:13
I really like Bernies work;I made the sheath myself for this one;)

http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x125/stalch/P3120008.jpg

http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x125/stalch/P3270007.jpg


This is a picture of my knife and one Bernie made for my brother below it:
http://i181.photobucket.com/albums/x125/stalch/burners/P2230017.jpg

On the strength of the knife I own, I'd buy again and happily recommend Bernies work. In my experience; He's also good to deal with and talk to.

atb

R.B.

This is the kind of thing I had in mind. I like the one in the middle with an unusual sheath.

pitta-pitta
20-12-2009, 17:15
Loads!
Guy Stainthorp and our own Dave Budd to name just two!
Take your time and have a good look around and ask them lots of questions!!
You can get alot of knife for that money so don't rush it!!
Good luck!
Chris.

I like the look of Guys work. I've been looking at his website. Is he a bit expensive though. Would he be able to do something really nice for £200?

pitta-pitta
20-12-2009, 17:20
What do you own at the moment?

SK BushMaster. Its OK but I'm not that in love with it.

If you've not got your own knife yet, then I'd urge you to splurge ten quid on a Mora, and use that to find out what you do and don't like/want.

I've had a couple of Moras. They are good and do the trick.

My first knife was a nice Kellam Puuko, but I didn't feel comfortable about battening with it (I suspect it would be fine). That was £60 down. Then I bought a Fallkniven TK1. Wonderful knife, but I found the handle had too many 'hot spots' for me, so that went. Total £300 down so far. Then an 'Old Oak' bushcrafter, very pleasant but unremarkable. £500 down now. Finally got the BG knife.

That's a whole lot of money wasted (OK, so got some back when I sold them) when I would have been able to bypass the expense had I figured out what I really wanted in the first place.

Anyway, the point is if you don't have a knife yet, get the Mora pdq and have a play. Then decide what you really want.

I've had a few knives but want to get a cracker as the wife wants to treat me for my birthday.

rancid badger
20-12-2009, 17:42
This is the kind of thing I had in mind. I like the one in the middle with an unusual sheath.

Whadya mean..... Unusual ?:nofeed:

That's the sort of thing I do/did, a lot:D

R.B.:)

big_swede
20-12-2009, 18:13
Leuku; www.samekniv.no

You don't need any other knife after this. Get the 8" version, anything less is for women and children, anything more is just macho. I have the nine inch version. :)

pitta-pitta
20-12-2009, 18:49
Whadya mean..... Unusual ?:nofeed:

That's the sort of thing I do/did, a lot:D

R.B.:)

I mean that shape of blade but with something extra added not there. An unusual sheath - perhaps carved or summink.

pitta-pitta
20-12-2009, 18:50
Leuku; www.samekniv.no

You don't need any other knife after this. Get the 8" version, anything less is for women and children, anything more is just macho. I have the nine inch version. :)

Like god til jakt og fiske som når man slår leir i skogen eller på fjellet.

big_swede
20-12-2009, 19:22
Like god til jakt og fiske som når man slår leir i skogen eller på fjellet.

Exactly!

(rough translation: Just as good for hunting and fishing as when you camp in the woods or in the mountains.)

There is an UK flag to the right, click for the english version.

pitta-pitta
20-12-2009, 19:34
Exactly!

(rough translation: Just as good for hunting and fishing as when you camp in the woods or in the mountains.)

There is an UK flag to the right, click for the english version.
I know mate. I was just teasing!

Shewie
20-12-2009, 20:07
Give Bushblade a shout, he's on your doorstep and makes some lovely knives.

Bernie and Hillbills are definitely worth a look too, and I'm not on commission.

I have one of Driftwoodwalkers' Light Bushcrafters which is my knife of choice at the moment though.

So many to mention really but if you search the Makers Market you'll get an idea of what's available to you. Always good to support the local community though if you can.

mayfly
20-12-2009, 20:48
Be warned, this knife thing is addictive :) I started looking for one to use and now have way too many according to some :rolleyes: Ahh, the lure of the sharp shinies :D

Anyway, Stuart Mitchell and Guy Stainthorp have been mentioned. I have knives by them both and they are both outstanding.

I recently got this one from Stuart Mitchell. I am always utterly impressed with the quality of his work. The fit and finish are amazing.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2702/4200322323_7b7374d351.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2735/4201075570_a8bc327801.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2638/4201076240_264b8721b9.jpg

And of course, Guy Stainthorp makes a great knife, I especially like the wood and the way the tang is done on this one I got from him about 18 months ago. The edge on this blade was truly amazing when it arrived.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2719/4200510275_3290466424.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2691/4200510161_2a798d9bfe.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4043/4201263214_792bfeca01.jpg

You can't go wrong with either of these makers and I think some of their knives would be in your price range for sure.

Chris

Shewie
20-12-2009, 21:45
And of course, Guy Stainthorp makes a great knife, I especially like the wood and the way the tang is done on this one I got from him about 18 months ago. The edge on this blade was truly amazing when it arrived.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2719/4200510275_3290466424.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2691/4200510161_2a798d9bfe.jpg

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4043/4201263214_792bfeca01.jpg

You can't go wrong with either of these makers and I think some of their knives would be in your price range for sure.

Chris


That's a cracker Chris, anymore details ?

mayfly
20-12-2009, 22:40
That's a cracker Chris, anymore details ?

Sure. I ordered this from Guy as one of his standard 3mm 01 bushcrafters and specified tapered tang, wooden handle with complimentary liners and mosaic pins. IIRC, he proposed the two-tone Amboyna burl and then I left it with him. The knife arrived several months later. Overall length is 240mm, blade 120mm. I just checked and it was delivered to me in December 2007, longer ago than I thought. The grind, in true Guy fashion, is "a combination of a flat bevel right from the spine and a secondary convex bevel from about 1/4 inch up the blade, zero ground all the way to form the edge". And believe me this thing was scary, scary sharp when it arrived. Probably the sharpest knife I have ever had on delivery. An edge like this does take a bit of skill to maintain tip-top, I usually need help :D Though this particular one to be honest is a drawer queen. But my point in citing it here, is that I have seen these (less dressed-up) sell for well under the budget indicated and based on what I know at least, I really can't think of a much better "hunting, camping, batoning" knife for the money. Guy delivers these with a quality sheath.

Chris

bushwacker bob
20-12-2009, 22:46
I would also vouch for Guy Stanthorp or Stuart Mitchell. Both make superb knives and are true gents to deal with. The knives are expensive but you get what you pay for and both retain their value if you decide you want to sell them on.

C_Claycomb
20-12-2009, 22:53
I am just going to interject something here.

You say you are after something for hunting, camping and battoning? Well, take a good hard look at folk who offer flat ground or convex groud blades, not just the ubiquitous Scandi grind on everything. The way I look at it, Scandis are nice for wood carving, but they aren't so good for hunting, battoning or food prep (camp chores) as something with a higher flat grind.

The two primary functions of a Scandi grind are the self-guiding effect you get when carving, and the self guiding effect you get when sharpening. The flip side is that for sharpening, you have to take off more metal in order to maintain the angle, and if you don't maintain that angle and keep a zero edge you lose the easy self-guided cutting ability.

I like Stu Mitchell's stuff, and Guy's, but with your budget you might also look over at some of the US makers. Bryan Goode springs to mind.
http://www.britishblades.com/forums/showthread.php?t=81882
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v454/bgoode/Companion.jpg

Then there is Charles May
http://charlesmayknives.blademakers.c om/

Thing is, there are a lot of good makers around who offer stuff that is refreshingly different from variations on the full tang Scandi theme. More so from the US, but here too. Spend some time going through the Makers sales on British Blades. You may not find that the knife you want is there for sale, but you might find a maker you hadn't thought of.

mayfly
20-12-2009, 23:00
Spend some time going through the Makers sales on British Blades. You may not find that the knife you want is there for sale, but you might find a maker you hadn't thought of.

Very sound advice! Read. A lot. Then decide.

bushwacker bob
20-12-2009, 23:35
Not forgetting some good hobbyist makers! Top of the list is Mr Claycomb. He'll be too modest to say so himself but his knives have a reputation for exellence amoungst serious knife users and his handles are reputed to be THE most comfortable to use.

Draven
20-12-2009, 23:35
I am just going to interject something here.

You say you are after something for hunting, camping and battoning? Well, take a good hard look at folk who offer flat ground or convex groud blades, not just the ubiquitous Scandi grind on everything. The way I look at it, Scandis are nice for wood carving, but they aren't so good for hunting, battoning or food prep (camp chores) as something with a higher flat grind.
That's true, obviously assuming the geometry is right.


The two primary functions of a Scandi grind are the self-guiding effect you get when carving, and the self guiding effect you get when sharpening. The flip side is that for sharpening, you have to take off more metal in order to maintain the angle, and if you don't maintain that angle and keep a zero edge you lose the easy self-guided cutting ability.
Here, you lose me. The myth that you have to sharpen the scandi to zero every time it can't shave arm hair is a load of rubbish! Stropping a scandi is easy to do and creates a tiny microbevel that not makes the edge a lot tougher while still excelling at woodwork, especially when compared to a convex grind or similar.
...in my very humble opinion :D

pitta-pitta
21-12-2009, 00:06
Some great options. Thanks. Time to have a good look and read and think.

JonathanD
21-12-2009, 00:23
Stu Mitchell is great to deal with and keeps you updated every step of the way. There are some great threads on here that show his work.

http://www.stuartmitchellknives.com/

http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=26423

Also check out British Reds thread about his PFK (precision Filed knife)

Hoodoo
21-12-2009, 02:43
For an all-round blade, I tend to agree with Chris. I generally prefer a thin blade with a flat grind, small bevel, flat grind, convex bevel, or convex grind. If it can't clean a bluegill, or slice bread, cheese and beefstick with ease, I don't really consider it an all-rounder.

http://faculty.gvsu.edu/triert/images28/all_round_knives1b.jpg

http://faculty.gvsu.edu/triert/images27/ingram1b.jpg

If it's a scandi, I prefer a thin blade, 3/32" thick or less.

http://faculty.gvsu.edu/triert/images28/skookum_carvers1b.jpg

It's not a bad idea, sometimes, to think outside the Woodlore box. ;) :pokenest:

If you think you need a scandi to make fuzz sticks or do other bushcrafty stuff, I'd say notnesseceleryso...

http://faculty.gvsu.edu/triert/images9/featherstick1b.jpg

C_Claycomb
21-12-2009, 10:46
...
Here, you lose me. The myth that you have to sharpen the scandi to zero every time it can't shave arm hair is a load of rubbish! Stropping a scandi is easy to do and creates a tiny microbevel that not makes the edge a lot tougher while still excelling at woodwork, especially when compared to a convex grind or similar.
...in my very humble opinion :D

I didn't say that you couldn't get a scandi sharp unless it was a zero edge, or if that's how it was read, I didn't mean it that way. I have tried my own scandis with and without stone ground micro bevels and the ones without such secondary bevels out-cut those that did. Both could still shave and slice paper and all those other tests for sharpenss. They just didn't cut wood the same way. I strop everything.

What I really meant though was that I have seen a heck of a lot of scandis which were sharpened badly because keeping the bevel flat was difficult and what you end up with is a short, thick, secondary bevel, or convex which is a long way removed from the micro bevels that we were just talking about.

I am with Hoohoo on the food prep. When I have been on canoe trips in Sweden and Norway, prime "bushcraft" country, knives get used most for food prep, whith fire wood prep being the number two function. If a Scandi is used, it works best if it is very thin, like the Mora, but given same stock thickness, a flat grind will still cut food better.

Draven
21-12-2009, 11:09
I didn't say that you couldn't get a scandi sharp unless it was a zero edge, or if that's how it was read, I didn't mean it that way. I have tried my own scandis with and without stone ground micro bevels and the ones without such secondary bevels out-cut those that did. Both could still shave and slice paper and all those other tests for sharpenss. They just didn't cut wood the same way. I strop everything.

What I really meant though was that I have seen a heck of a lot of scandis which were sharpened badly because keeping the bevel flat was difficult and what you end up with is a short, thick, secondary bevel, or convex which is a long way removed from the micro bevels that we were just talking about.

I am with Hoohoo on the food prep. When I have been on canoe trips in Sweden and Norway, prime "bushcraft" country, knives get used most for food prep, whith fire wood prep being the number two function. If a Scandi is used, it works best if it is very thin, like the Mora, but given same stock thickness, a flat grind will still cut food better.

My apologies mate, I misunderstood :o I agree about stropping, and that's how I set in microbevels too, stone-ground makes them too rough whereas if you do it with a strop, the full cutting edge will be polished even if the entire grind isn't :) I know what you mean about problems sharpening scandis, my first Mora clipper is that way! Reserved for kitchen duty now . . .

I don't necessarily prefer thin blades, though on principle I don't like anything thicker than 3mm. My 'do everything' blade is my Scandi-ground Bernie Garland knife, in 3mm with a 19 degree bevel, but my Enzo's still a great knife in 3.5mm with a 15 degree bevel. I must admit to really liking the high grinds on Finnish knives. To be honest, I've never had a knife thicker than 2mm with a grind bigger than 20 degrees, so I've never really had a problem with scandis as far as food preparation goes; certainly nothing serious enough to warrant choosing a different grind.

Pete

bushwacker bob
21-12-2009, 20:08
For an all-round blade, I tend to agree with Chris. I generally prefer a thin blade with a flat grind, small bevel, flat grind, convex bevel, or convex grind. If it can't clean a bluegill, or slice bread, cheese and beefstick with ease, I don't really consider it an all-rounder.



http://faculty.gvsu.edu/triert/images27/ingram1b.jpg

If it's a scandi, I prefer a thin blade, 3/32" thick or less.
That Gene Ingram is nice:)



It's not a bad idea, sometimes, to think outside the Woodlore box. ;) :pokenest:
Usually
[QUOTE=Draven;614869] so I've never really had a problem with scandis as far as food preparation goes; certainly nothing serious enough to warrant choosing a different grind.

Pete
You've never tried a 4 or 5mm woodie to slice carrots then?

Draven
21-12-2009, 21:01
You've never tried a 4 or 5mm woodie to slice carrots then?

The thickest knife I have is an Enzo at 3.5mm; take a look at the grind on it:
http://neo-thought.parallel-worlds.net/enzo2.jpg
It has a 15 degree bevel, and I can assure you, has no problems cutting carrots :D

All my other scandis are 2 or 3mm :) Whether I like the Woodie is a whole nother matter, I think it's a terrible design personally. But I disagree with the notion that the grind is the problem!

Pete

pitta-pitta
21-12-2009, 21:05
Lots to think on over the Christmas Turkey. Is it just me but I tried to type the name Bernie Garland over on British Blades and his name won't come up. I just get ****** *******. Is there something I'm missing or is it just a computer bug? I was trying to see what people there thought of Bernie's work. It just keeps blanking it though? Any suggestions?

paulbibby
21-12-2009, 22:07
Lots to think on over the Christmas Turkey. Is it just me but I tried to type the name Bernie Garland over on British Blades and his name won't come up. I just get ****** *******. Is there something I'm missing or is it just a computer bug? I was trying to see what people there thought of Bernie's work. It just keeps blanking it though? Any suggestions?


sigh
its all got childish im sorry to say pitta pitta
a vendetta has been started by little people who speak lots but say nothing.
its a situation that is in a sorry state much to the blame of a small minority of insecure little people.. pay no heed to it!!
research bernie and you will find many happy and contented owners of his knives also take a look at roger harrison of Bison bushcraft

pitta-pitta
21-12-2009, 22:25
sigh
its all got childish im sorry to say pitta pitta
a vendetta has been started by little people who speak lots but say nothing.
its a situation that is in a sorry state much to the blame of a small minority of insecure little people.. pay no heed to it!!
research bernie and you will find many happy and contented owners of his knives also take a look at roger harrison of Bison bushcraft

OK mate. I thought it was me going mad. When I typed his name it read on my draft but then dissappeared when I posted. It makes it hard to ask for proper advice. I can see Bernie Garland is a good maker and he's on my short list. Anyway, enough excitement for one day.:confused::confused::confu sed:

brancho
21-12-2009, 22:34
. Is it just me but I tried to type the name Bernie Garland over on British Blades and his name won't come up. I just get ****** *******. Is there something I'm missing or is it just a computer bug? I

Hes banned there and here I do not know why or wish to be involved in any discussions about it as this has no bearing on the quality of his work which is much admired.

JonathanD
21-12-2009, 23:40
OK mate. I thought it was me going mad. When I typed his name it read on my draft but then dissappeared when I posted. It makes it hard to ask for proper advice. I can see Bernie Garland is a good maker and he's on my short list. Anyway, enough excitement for one day.:confused::confused::confu sed:


It's to do with the person rather than the knives mate. Bernie (the person) is like marmite :lmao:

PeterHW
22-12-2009, 09:13
I bought a knife from Roger Harrison and unfortunately had to send it back.....it might be the only bad one he has done...so I cannot comment further....but the grinds were badly off centre....and I do mean badly....but in fairness to the guy he took it back and refunded my money....and no one is perfect....every maker will have a bad day....but I was suprised it was not noticed and "pulled" before it went out....

Also....be aware that some types of woods offered for grips whislt being very pretty can be a bit "soft" and show "dinks and dents"....you can lift these out with steam from a wet cloth and heat ( iron works best but be careful )....or you can buy wooden grips which are very hard and from my perspective are better suited...

I happened to order "applewood" on that knife...my choice and no-one else is responsible...but the grips were very soft in comparison to other woods....YMMV...but it is worth noting this when considering what to choose...

FGYT
22-12-2009, 09:21
The thickest knife I have is an Enzo at 3.5mm; take a look at the grind on it:
http://neo-thought.parallel-worlds.net/enzo2.jpg
It has a 15 degree bevel, and I can assure you, has no problems cutting carrots :D

All my other scandis are 2 or 3mm :) Whether I like the Woodie is a whole nother matter, I think it's a terrible design personally. But I disagree with the notion that the grind is the problem!

Pete


See you do have other grinds than Scandi thats a Sabre grind :D nice fat secondary will soon sort it out ;)

the Woody profile is fine much better in 3mm and higher grind for most stuff or at least a Dital taper on a 4mm blank and higher grind etc
also works well scaled down in size

im playing with some with high sabre grinds nearly full flat which should work fine


still not my fav Bushy knife which is about to become one in 6mm thick ive nearly finished :eek::D with a Hybrid grind
:mexwave::mexwave::mexwave:

ATB

Duncan

Hoodoo
22-12-2009, 12:35
That Gene Ingram is nice:)


Thanks bb! That was a custom blend of two of his models plus some tweaks. Thicker than normal handle and no sharpening choil.

MikeE
22-12-2009, 14:20
Being a bit of a knife geek I own and use knives from:
Stuart Mitchell; Bernie Garland; Guy Stainthorp, John Millington; Elma; Karl Erik Lindblad; Joel Delorme (JoJo); Mykul Morris (USA); Harry Boden; Bowen Blades (USA); Barry Scott (Yep him!); Stuart Barker; Chevin; Paul Baker; Wilkinson Sword; Driftwoodwalker; Shing and quite a few more.

I find that I tend to carry my Elma knives most often as they are affordable and do the job brilliantly and on a double dangler can be carried on a belt but in the pocket to reduce the profile! He does a mean sheath and matching firesteel if asked too. He and Joel Delorme could probably make a couple of matched knives in different styles for that amount too (worth thinking about)!

Stu M does make exceedingly good knives and I use a couple as neck knives regularly and they are excellent!

My latest is from Mykul Morris in the States (bought to accompany a friction folder of his, which is my EDC) and I can't wait to test it out in the New Year. It's certainly well designed and made!

I'm not on commission but very pleased with all my purchases from here and over on BB. Each knife has its own strengths and uses but as long as you know what your going to use it for, you should be spoilt for choice.

redandshane
22-12-2009, 17:38
Elma is selling a beauty

http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=50826

Draven
22-12-2009, 18:09
See you do have other grinds than Scandi thats a Sabre grind :D nice fat secondary will soon sort it out ;)
Howdy mate! I disagree :) However, I can't seem to find many people who agree on what a Sabre grind is (between high scandi and full flat). I just consider it a fairly typical Finnish Scandi grind. There's no questioning that it's Scandinavian :p At any rate, I prefer to think of it as a Scandi simply because I don't really understand the point of seperating 'High scandi but not a full flat' from Scandi :p And, of course, because it is scandinavian. It does have a microbevel though, full on secondaries don't do much for me except on proper full flat grinds ;)


the Woody profile is fine much better in 3mm and higher grind for most stuff or at least a Dital taper on a 4mm blank and higher grind etc
also works well scaled down in size

im playing with some with high sabre grinds nearly full flat which should work fine


still not my fav Bushy knife which is about to become one in 6mm thick ive nearly finished :eek::D with a Hybrid grind
:mexwave::mexwave::mexwave:

ATB

Duncan

I have been interested in one of your woodies for a while; I don't think that it's a fundamentally bad knife, I just think that the thickness and geometry don't pair up well at all, and the blade profile wouldn't work for me. I think that a high scandi and 3mm steel would do it a world of good!

Pete