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Toddy
20-10-2009, 22:28
Not the real stuff, but the stuff your Auntie used to give you at the New Year since children weren't given alcohol. So sweet you loved it and so nippy with gingery stuff you couldn't drink much :D

I shopped in the Co today, and I bought a wee bottle of the Yu-lade stuff. ( they don't call it ginger wine anymore, it's ginger drink :rolleyes: )

Anyway, the ingredients are something of a mixed bag.......with things like polyoxyethylene sorbitan monopalmitate (polysorbate 40), and the like.

Anyone have a good recipe for something real ? I make the ginger beer, and I don't want alcoholic, but I would like something very sweet and gingery, just to go with the shortbread and dumpling :D

cheers,
Toddy

British Red
20-10-2009, 22:53
Recipe, no - but I'd love some too :)

That said but both " Dorset Ginger" and "Rochester Ginger" cordials are available down here. I only have the Rochester one in at the moment and it does contain Potassium Sorbate as the only preservative. About 3 a bottle from health food shops

If no-one answer Mary I'll dredge me books out for a Ginger cordial recipe and have a play for you

Red

Toddy
20-10-2009, 23:27
You're on :D
The tiny bottle makes a gallon of the stuff :eek: and uses bags of sugar too.
It also contains capsicum and natural lime flavouring.

Remember your mulled wine mix ? Think really, really strong and nippy and it'd be almost there.

We can get Crabbie's ginger wine up here, but it's not the same stuff, at all.

cheers,
M

British Red
21-10-2009, 00:24
Ahhh so its sort of like a concentrated cordial then? I've never seen it but I get the idea. Lets see if anyone has a recipe and if not I'll see what I can whomp up

The thing with capsicum and lime - is that the good one or the nasty one?

Red

BigShot
21-10-2009, 00:31
We can get Crabbie's ginger wine up here, but it's not the same stuff, at all.


Not really all that nice either. (I absolutely love their ginger beer though.. FAR too drinkable to be a good idea.)

I tried this stuff about 2 days after trying the Crabbie's gear for the first time and the difference was a surprise. I thought it was really nice and t'other half agreed it was an improvement (she really didn't approve of the Crabbie's stuff).
http://www.demijohn.co.uk/product.php?product=WN0405DJL

I'm not sure who makes it, that shop puts it straight from a large demijohn into the pretty bottle of your choice.

Toddy
21-10-2009, 00:38
Hmmm, I'm not a fan either.

That's a lovely site you linked to :D Thank you for it :approve:

BR, the capsicum and the lime are good things, they seem to work well with the ginger.

cheers,
Toddy

BigShot
21-10-2009, 00:46
If you're in the neighbourhood you should drop in. It's on the road from Grassmarket up to the Royal Mile (on the left as you go up the hill). I believe there's one in Glasgow too.

Go with a bit of time on your hands and try the wares... they don't stop at wines either: whisky, spirits, liqueurs, vinegars and oils are on offer too.

A wonderful little shop and getting to taste before you buy is just great!

Give them money - take booze away.
Do it.

(Oh - and they'll re-fill their bottles too - unfortunately it's not "free refills" - which is a shame).

British Red
21-10-2009, 00:52
Yep makes sense....I'd be tempted by lime zest as well as juice...

Capsicum is a poser as it could be anything....some form of chilli for heat probably....

I'd go muscavado on the sugar....or perhaps demerrarraarraaa (never know when to stop with that like banananananananana)

Where would you stand on a little cardamom and cloves? Cloves certainly works I think

A shake of cream of tartar to stop crystalisation perhaps?

Eye of newt?

Red

Toddy
21-10-2009, 01:11
The bottle has caramel colouring.........how about a little treacle ? It shouldn't overpower the ginger and spices. If I could eat liquorice I'd be seriously tempted by a bit in it.
Cardamom and cloves sound good, maybe a touch of aniseed ? Star anise ?
I'm thinking sweet nippy tar :o :D , kind of :) You know, I think tea might work......... Hugh, have a play; you haven't made a bad mix yet, even if it doesn't turn out like the Yulade stuff I'm sure it'll be worth drinking :cool:

I'm trying to remember how my Grandmother made hers. I think there was just ordinary pepper ground into it. I don't think it was chilli, that was kind of novel stuff in my childhood, but pepper was put out every time the table was set,
I know my Mum usually bought the Yulade stuff since it was a lot quicker. Don't know what the great Aunts put in theirs but the stuff was lethal :eek: so good, but so bad. :D

cheers,
M

British Red
21-10-2009, 01:20
Star anise would be a winner for sure and I like the treacle thought...I could just make some caramel though......bit less...treacly....hmmmm yeah caramel I think....nice colour too...easy to add to get the right colour...

I did think about pepper but of course pepper is piperaceae rather than capsicum...now szechuan pepper mmmmmmmmmm (but Zanthoxylum rather than capiscum :( )


I'll have a play when I get a moment


I'm guessing it should be pretty gloopy?

Whittler Kev
21-10-2009, 11:40
I remember in the 1970's my dad having a "ginger beer plant" in a demijohn that he took some out of and when it was getting empty he justed added more water and(sugar?) It never ran out until we got fed up with it and threw it out after several months. Anyone else have one?
Unfortunatelly both parents gone now so can't ask them

Whittler Kev
21-10-2009, 11:53
Just found this

Ginger beer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Ginger beer is a carbonated (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Carbonation) soft drink (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Soft_drink) that is flavored primarily with ginger (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Ginger), lemon (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Lemon), and sugar (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Sugar). It is rarely produced as an alcoholic beverage (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Alcoholic_beverage).
It originated in England (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/England) in the mid-1700s and reached its peak of popularity in the early 1900s.[1] (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/#cite_note-DonaldYates-0) The original recipe requires only ginger, sugar, and water, to which is added a gelatinous substance called "ginger beer plant" (see below (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Ginger_beer#Ginger_beer_plant) ). Fermentation over a few days turns the mixture into ginger beer. Lemon may be added. A simple version of this recipe can be made at home today in which grated fresh ginger, sugar, a small amount of baker's yeast, and (optionally) lemon juice is bottled in a 2 litre bottle. It is sealed at room temperature for a day or two before refrigerating.[2] (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/#cite_note-1)
Instead of using the ginger beer plant, other forms of live cultures can produce the fermented ginger beer. Brewers or Baker's yeast can be used to do this. Other ways include a culture of lactic acid bacteria (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Lactic_acid_bacteria), kefir (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Kefir) grains, or tibicos (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Tibicos). Ginger beer is fizzy due to carbon dioxide. The alcohol content when produced by the traditional process can be high, up to 11%,[1] (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/#cite_note-DonaldYates-0) although it is possible to ferment ginger beer in such a way as to produce little alcohol. Ginger beer may be mixed with beer (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Beer) (usually a British ale (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Ale) of some sort) to make one type of shandy (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Shandy), and with Gosling's Black Seal (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Gosling%27s_Rum) rum (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Rum) to make a drink, originally from Bermuda (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Bermuda), called a Dark 'N' Stormy (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Dark_%27N%27_Stormy). The soda version of ginger beer is the main ingredient in the Moscow Mule (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Moscow_Mule) cocktail.
The beverage produced industrially today is often not brewed (fermented). Such ginger beer is carbonated with pressurized carbon dioxide (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Carbon_dioxide), does not contain alcohol, and is sold as a soft drink. Ginger beer is similar to ginger ale (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/wiki/Ginger_ale) except that it has a significantly stronger ginger taste, often being described as ginger ale with a kick to it. Its other distinctive properties include its traditional cloudy appearance, its predominantly citrus sour taste base and its spicy ginger bite.

Whittler Kev
21-10-2009, 11:58
I used to make ginger beer when my children were growing up. If you knew someone who had a 'plant' they could give you some of thiers and away you went.
What you need is, about 2 teaspoons ofginger powder (the kind you use for baking) 2 of sugar and about 2oz yeast, and a small jar with a screw on lid - jam jar size is fine. Put all three into the jar and mix.
What you need to do then is to leave it to work for a few days and you're away! To keep it going, you will need to 'feed it' with more sugar and ginger. Can't remember wether I used to add more yeast or not.
I made so much ginger beer from this that my kids got fed up with eventually!!
VERY IMPORTANT!! never screw the lid on tight as it will explode, I know from personal experience! I had to wash all the yellow mix from my kitchen walls. The jar flew accross my kitchen and just missed me!!!
http://www.yours.co.uk/Home--Leisure/Search-Results/Food--Drink/Search-Results/Cookery-Tips/How-do-you-make-a-ginger-beer-plant/
or

Alcoholic Ginger Beer
Equipment:-
• A jar and lid which is big enough to contain the plant
• One pint-sized measuring jug
• Several clean & dry two litre plastic bottles
• Teaspoons
• A large pan
• A fine cloth for straining
Ingredients:-
• Dried ginger
• Dried yeast
• Sugar
• Juice of four lemons
• Water

Making the Plant
1. In the jar place one teaspoon of dried yeast, two teaspoons of dried ginger, four teaspoons of sugar and a pint of cold water.
2. Stir and keep at room temperature.
3. Feed the plant every day with two teaspoons of dried ginger and four teaspoons of sugar. Stir after feeding
4. The plant will be ready in one week

Making the Ginger Beer
1. Place 1kg. (2lb) of sugar and two pints of boiling water in the large pan. The sugar will dissolve.
2. Add the juice of the four lemons.
3. Strain the contents of the jar through the cloth into the pan.
4. Add 14 pints of room temperature water.
5. Stir and bottle. Fill the bottles about seven eighths full as you need to allow for expansion. Squeeze the air out of the bottles to stop them exploding under pressure from the contents.
6. Store the bottles in a safe place at room temperature, and leave for three to four weeks to brew.
7. Discard half the solid from the plant or give it to someone so they may start their own. Place the remaining half in a clean jar with a pint of water and continue to feed as above.

Toddy
21-10-2009, 13:59
Nice one on finding the recipes and posting :D

I make it every year, well, I did, until I blew up my neighbour's kitchen :eek: Literally.......well it wasn't really my fault. I *told* Billy it was lively, and he only drank half the bottle and put it in the cupboard. It was in a glass Irn Bru type bottle, It blew up, the top half went up like a rocket, took out a dinner plate sized piece of the worktop, bounced it off the ceiling and shattered sticky glass and booze (it took out a bottle of whisky, some wine and assorted glassware along with it when it went off :rolleyes: ) everywhere in their kitchen. Gave his missus a hell of a fright, she was ironing in front of the cupboard when it exploded. Very lucky it didn't do it when she opened the cupboard earlier.

HWMBLT banned me from brewing for a while after that one :o

Motto is drink it quick or keep it damned cold :D

cheers,
Toddy

g4ghb
21-10-2009, 14:11
I'd defiantly be interested in what you come up with too Hugh. I've been on the lookout for a truly non alcoholic ginger beer for ages..... most recipes i have found involve yeast so to me that means fermentation...... and thus (even if it is minuscule ammounts) alcohol :(

A ginger cordial you could add to carbonated water could be a way of making a 'ginger fizzy' :rolleyes: - perhaps I'll have to have a play too, won't be anywhere near a Red Recipe though i'm sure ;)

British Red
29-11-2009, 02:05
Had a stab today for fun whilst I was making up my mulled wine syrup


Tried it like this:

4 thumb sized pieces of Root ginger coarsely grated
1 star anise
1 coarsely chopped chilli
250ml of dark muscavado sugar
1litre of water

Brought it all to the boil and then kept it there until it reduced by half

Strained it through a jelly bag

Took a teaspoon and drank some

:eek::eek::eek:

Damn stuff nigh on burned my mouth out.

Diluted with 50% water...ahh just chemical burns this time:o

Diluted to about 20% strength. Now tastes like a slightly less sticky ginger wine..nice and warming...sort of like Dorset Ginger (or Rochester Ginger)....but not. Less sweet, more fire, little aniseed twist.

Worth trying for sure

Red

Toddy
29-11-2009, 10:01
Today it seems I'm making Ginger wine :D

Yeah, that sounds like the result we got as kids, before the co mellowed out the mixture. The commercial one is incredibly sweet though.

Thanks BR, I'll get some fresh ginger today and have a bash at your recipe :cool:

atb,
M

Mad Mike
29-11-2009, 11:15
I am not a great fan of ginger - SWMBO is

http://www.scotsindependent.org/features/food/ginger_wine.htm

Ginger Wine or Cordial

I don't know what this stuff is like but their scotch pie recipe is good

British Red
29-11-2009, 11:43
Today it seems I'm making Ginger wine :D

Yeah, that sounds like the result we got as kids, before the co mellowed out the mixture. The commercial one is incredibly sweet though.

Thanks BR, I'll get some fresh ginger today and have a bash at your recipe :cool:

atb,
M
I should have added lime zest too I think Mary...wouldn't have hurt for sure.

I'll do that in another batch. Man this stuff is eye waternigly strong though :)

If you want me to post you some of this batch just PM me your addy

Red

Front Room Woodlander
16-01-2010, 19:38
I've been waiting for your recipe. I have all the ingredients and will have a go this evening.
Thank you BR

British Red
16-01-2010, 20:22
Go gentle with it - its buring hot at that strength - lovely in sparkling mineral water though.

g4ghb
16-01-2010, 21:16
How did I miss this Hugh!?

I bet Libby will complain when she see's the additions to the shopping list next week though;)

British Red
16-01-2010, 21:57
Probably doing things and spending time with your family Graham :)

You well my friend?

morch
16-01-2010, 22:21
Is this the stuff you mean Toddy...
http://www.hopandgrape.co.uk/catalog/detailV2_8.asp?itemid=RID20176 651&

Until a few years ago Boots used to sell the stuff.

My family make it every year, the hotter the better. Just mix with water and sugar

Dave

Whittler Kev
17-06-2010, 18:36
I've added Recipes and suggestions to my cordial pdf. If anyone wants it (or the alcoholic one) they need to PM me with a normal email address as I don't know how to attach it to a PM on here

Large Sack
21-06-2010, 19:34
Go gentle with it - its buring hot at that strength - lovely in sparkling mineral water though.

Hi Red, I love ginger myself, as do my kids, and I have no doubt that said cordial would be a great evening warmer...however...ok ok, get the laughs out of the way all of you (but I am being serious) ...are there any adverse effects later on...in the trousers down dept? The last thing I need in the middle of the night is a continual mad scramble for what we affectionately call 'The Bucket of Weezdom' (I tend to go easy on the chillies too when out in the wilds)

That said, it sounds fantastic. We'll give it a try anyway and let you know how we get on.

Cheers

Sack

dolphin cottage
03-07-2010, 15:32
Hi Everybody
I have just discovered Bushcraft whilst searching websites for recipes for ginger wine.
I would suggest that my wife and I are the grandad and/or grandma that bushcraft members refer to as the long ago makers of ginger wine they had at Christmas, but alas now forgotten.
Your prayers are now answered. My mother made ginger wine 70 years ago and we are still making it but not just for Christmas but all through the year. Our grand kids are not too keen about it but we think it's great.
It entails buying the ginger essence from a chemist in the Yorkshire dales for about 1.70 but after adding sugar etc this makes 4 pints, so it's not expensive.
If you are interested just reply and I will let you have further info.
(We go the the Dales regularly so normally pick the essence up but it can be bought by mail order)

Whittler Kev
03-07-2010, 15:44
Hi. I see your a new member (1st post). Well found. Why not put the details up on here for everyone to share?

British Red
03-07-2010, 16:51
Hi Red, I love ginger myself, as do my kids, and I have no doubt that said cordial would be a great evening warmer...however...ok ok, get the laughs out of the way all of you (but I am being serious) ...are there any adverse effects later on...in the trousers down dept? The last thing I need in the middle of the night is a continual mad scramble for what we affectionately call 'The Bucket of Weezdom' (I tend to go easy on the chillies too when out in the wilds)

That said, it sounds fantastic. We'll give it a try anyway and let you know how we get on.

Cheers

Sack


No problems at this end fellah - far less so than a few pints of Badgers poachers choice anyway!!

skcollobcat10
04-07-2010, 02:41
Hello Dolphin,
could you please send me your ginger recipe so I could try it? I sent you an e mail but you probably did not see it.

Regards skcollobcat10

Whittler Kev
04-07-2010, 12:10
Hello Dolphin,
could you please send me your ginger recipe so I could try it? I sent you an e mail but you probably did not see it.

Regards skcollobcat10

Or put it up on here and share it with the world