PDA

View Full Version : BCB "Combat Survival Tin"



BushcraftBaird112
03-06-2009, 23:15
The Combat Survival Kit/Tin is based upon John 'Lofty' Wiseman's (ex SAS, Survival Expert) Survival Kit. It is a survival kit primarily designed for the general public and is perfect for hikers, scout associations, climbers, anyone who enjoys the outdoors and is also a great starter kit. The Combat Survival Tin's components have been compiled to allow for the individual to maintain a decent standard of survival for 48 -72 hours, while awaiting and aiding rescue.

Contents and Specs:

Water resistant tin
Vinyl tape
Button compass
Knife
Matches
Pencil
Purification tablets
Snare wire
Candle
Flint & striker
Hacksaw blade
Fishing kit
Whistle
Sewing kit
Safety pins
Wire saw
Accident evaluation form
Survival instructions

Weight: 170g (6oz)
Size: 4.5" x 3" x 1"
NATO APPROVED

Average price: £10-15


This is the one I currently own. I have made some changes but the contents are mostly similar.

http://i635.photobucket.com/albums/uu76/bushcraftbaird112/036.jpg
http://i635.photobucket.com/albums/uu76/bushcraftbaird112/037.jpg

For those who buy this-this is a great starter /backup kit to keep in the bottom of your rucksack, this is not supposed to subtitue your main kit, and I recommend that you do change some of its contents.

Thank you for reading

helixpteron
04-06-2009, 00:20
Might be a better idea to carry it on the person, because if you should become separated from your pack, you still have the kit, which is the original idea behind the tin!

If you really want to carry it in your pack, perhaps having it more easily accessible, rather than in the bottom of the pack, may also be an idea, as the pack won't then need to be emptied to reach the kit.

wingstoo
04-06-2009, 20:54
And John still carries his when out and about.:)

rik_uk3
04-06-2009, 22:01
From a UK point of view (not some parts of Scotland maybe) most of that list would be on you anyway, dump the fishing lines in the UK, waste of space. In the UK these little tins are not really needed, but they are a bit of fun to play with. As mentioned in some of the many, many, many posts about these tins, for UK use carry a mobile phone for one thing, the rest really should be on your belt on in your pockets.

Mistwalker
04-06-2009, 23:29
I like the idea of these kinds of kits for a back-up plan. I bought a couple of similar kits designed by Doug Ritter I believe, made by AMK, to keep in our vehicles. I like the fact that this tin comes with lifeboat matches and not just regular ones. I have a friend who makes little knives perfect for the little tin kits.

Toddy
04-06-2009, 23:35
I'm with Rik on this one ; I've seen dozens of these, usually filled with the most ingenious and seemingly practical stuff, but I don't think I know 'anyone' who has ever really used it :dunno:

It seems to be one of those *good idea just in case* things, that rapidly becomes clutter.

Oh, and my pocketses is a handbag :D Just don't ask me to find anything quickly in it :o

cheers,
Toddy

Neanderthal
05-06-2009, 20:27
Desided not to take mine last week and could have done with the gaffa tape stuck to the bottom to repair my glasses. :(

You only need it when you don't have it with you. :D

Stu

Humpback
05-06-2009, 21:14
Had a LW inspired survival tin when I first became interested in 'survival' carried it religiously for five years. Never had cause to use it in anger. Then I discovered I was not into 'survival' but 'bushcraft' = living comfortably as possible in the outdoors for periods upto 1 week or so (my definition).

I still kept the tin and spent many a happy hour refining it before dispensing with it completely.

For me, in the UK, under the definition above a 'survival tin' is not required.

Alan

John Fenna
05-06-2009, 21:40
I used mine a couple of times...once, in the days when I smoked, when I ran out of lighter fluid....once for gaffa tape and fishing line to repair a torn daysack (do not bin the fishing kit - it does a LOT more than catch fish!) oh and once for a plaster to cover a cut....thats all, in some 1/4 century of carrying one.

Twodogs
05-06-2009, 23:11
I carryed one in my belt order for years in the day , when I opened it some years later it was a right mess full of melted candle wax and beef oxo ....
Twodogs

bothyman
05-06-2009, 23:24
Why not buy this book (http://www.amazon.co.uk/98-6-Art-Keeping-Your-Alive/dp/1586852345/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244236938&sr=8-2) and make your own .

It's a lot better if you can customise your own.

The book tells you how to make one.

MickT

Bumpy
05-06-2009, 23:46
for UK use carry a mobile phone for one thing..
I'm just wondering Rik, do you by any chance work for a mobile phone retailer?
It's just that every time any variation of this topic comes up you always mention the same thing - this absolute belief that a mobile phone is the answer if you ever get in a bit of bother whilst out "playing". I do not live in Scotland, and there are plenty of tarmac roads where I live, but I have managed to instantly kill at least one mobile phone by falling into water with it, have had them go flat on me on a regular basis and there are many many many places near where I live (including places where I play!) where I get no reception at all. Personally I'd rather have the matches, firesteel, gaffa tape, wire, knife etc... These things should be in my pockets, and they might be, but if I have the tin I have the bases covered - but good luck with your "Bushcraft mobile":rolleyes:
Maybe suggest it to BCB and the military - they could just issue every one with a cheap Pay as You Go mobile phone and forget the nato matches etc

rik_uk3
07-06-2009, 09:51
I'm just wondering Rik, do you by any chance work for a mobile phone retailer?
It's just that every time any variation of this topic comes up you always mention the same thing - this absolute belief that a mobile phone is the answer if you ever get in a bit of bother whilst out "playing". I do not live in Scotland, and there are plenty of tarmac roads where I live, but I have managed to instantly kill at least one mobile phone by falling into water with it, have had them go flat on me on a regular basis and there are many many many places near where I live (including places where I play!) where I get no reception at all. Personally I'd rather have the matches, firesteel, gaffa tape, wire, knife etc... These things should be in my pockets, and they might be, but if I have the tin I have the bases covered - but good luck with your "Bushcraft mobile":rolleyes:
Maybe suggest it to BCB and the military - they could just issue every one with a cheap Pay as You Go mobile phone and forget the nato matches etc

No Bumby, I'm a Nurse, and when the same question is asked I'll give the same answer.

Forget these little tins and just carry some basics in your pockets.

PS, get a waterproof case for your mobile.

Goatboy
07-06-2009, 10:30
I'm lucky, I don't even get a mobile signal in my house... drives the boss mad :D
Goatboy.

Asa Samuel
07-06-2009, 12:30
I'm just wondering Rik, do you by any chance work for a mobile phone retailer?
It's just that every time any variation of this topic comes up you always mention the same thing - this absolute belief that a mobile phone is the answer if you ever get in a bit of bother whilst out "playing". I do not live in Scotland, and there are plenty of tarmac roads where I live, but I have managed to instantly kill at least one mobile phone by falling into water with it, have had them go flat on me on a regular basis and there are many many many places near where I live (including places where I play!) where I get no reception at all. Personally I'd rather have the matches, firesteel, gaffa tape, wire, knife etc... These things should be in my pockets, and they might be, but if I have the tin I have the bases covered - but good luck with your "Bushcraft mobile":rolleyes:
Maybe suggest it to BCB and the military - they could just issue every one with a cheap Pay as You Go mobile phone and forget the nato matches etc

Sounds like you need a better phone ;)

bikething
07-06-2009, 14:46
I'm lucky, I don't even get a mobile signal in my house... drives the boss mad :D
Goatboy.me too :rolleyes:

(good innit? :D)

John Fenna
07-06-2009, 14:47
Me 3!
Who needs comms at home?:D

Nigel
07-06-2009, 21:56
As Rik mentioned the survival tin is more a plaything than something to rely on to get you out of trouble. Most items within the kit are of substandard quality, although the wire saw does double as a good snare. I think you would be better off making your own kit, also adding a mobile phone would be a good idea.

British Red
07-06-2009, 22:23
Ifind a few of these threads frustrating. The idea of emergency survival is unlikely, but a few choice "items" that are "just in case" is common sense to me. As people have said things like gaffa tape, but also sewing kit, ouch pouch, some field line for boot laces, guy lines etc., a spare lighter, a small quality backup compass, some tinder and other choice items have probably never saved my life - but they have saved my outing. Same with first aid - stuff that means a minor mishap does not become a trip ruination makes complete sense to me.

How you carry the stuff is up to you. Mine does live in a special container. The reason is that when I get up and walk out the door I can just sling it on my belt (its a possibles pouch I keep my stuff in). I don't have to pat all my pockets going "lighter, torch ...."etc.

If anyone here has never snapped a bootlace, had a lighter fail or needed a plaster, then they need to get out more! Nothing that requires a mobile phone - which should always be a measure of last resort...but s little sensible planning that saves an annoyance becoming a trip ruiner.

Red

John Fenna
07-06-2009, 22:35
I have to agree (yet again) with Mr Red.
Although I have not had to use much from my Survival Tin it still earns its place as an "insurance policy"!
As to mobile phones - I would prefer the means of self rescue than calling out the emergency services due to something I could have fixed if I had been carrying a small emergency kit.
For big emergencies then yes the phone is ideal!

RAPPLEBY2000
08-06-2009, 03:02
I still have an origional BCB "Lofty" survival tin! though the orange label is so ripped it's barely visible.

Ive had it since my 16th birthday it think, so it's 20 years old...

I've used it only a few times, once to boil water in (basically My friend was meant to bring a mess tin to heat water...he didn't) it's a very tricky thing to do, and you are very likely to spill the water in your fire.

I've taken it on a climbing holiday to Spain in my pocket whilst on an airplane as you are told to do in the "SAS survival handbook"(long before 911) the security guard had a good rummage in it and saw it was harmless.

I used the electric tape to fix a tent pole, used the food items I'd added (sugar, salt)
and fixed a button but nothing much else:(

I've taken it all over the place but sadly never really tested it.
(or should that be thankfully i haven't tested it).;)

It's now just a "survival curiosity" in my cupboard.

smoggy
08-06-2009, 09:12
I think some people are missing the point(s) here..........

No you don't need a survival kit in the UK......but it's only a survival kit if that's what needed, in the UK it's a possibles tin/boy scouts pocket/emergency stock....what ever name you choose to use! The point is it's a collection of usefull items which is always ready and available and should be easy to locate, should you need it......
I would never buy a piece of kit like this.....but I do have various versions.....be they tins/bags/film canisters/cigar tubes etc....they are secreted about the caravan/both cars/rucksack/tent bag/and my pocket. I don't even have to think about them untill I need them, they all contain different bits and pieces depending on their invisaged useage, and are often added too as and when. Which is the fun part, putting them together in the first place, and many a time I've given one away to people I've met along the way out camping/fishing/cycling/walking when they have been a little unprepaired!

As for mobile phones....I often go to areas where there is no or sparodic coverage, ie Kielder forrest, or village come to that! However I always take my phones, (yes two long story) why not? They're not heavy and work most of the time.....you may be pefectly capable of not getting into trouble or getting yourself out of it....but what about the fool you meet along the way who need medical treatment immediately?

The problem with keeping these bits and pieces in yout pocket.....you have to put them in before you go, and hope you remember everything and don't lose one item as you take another one out!

It's a wise man who knows when he will or will not require a piece of string or a safety pin....it's a wiser man who knows where he can get it if needs be!

Smoggy

Toddy
08-06-2009, 09:49
Yeah, but it's hardly a "Survival" tin then is it?
It's a bag of usefuls :D .............like my handbag, or my pockets.

I do agree that when 'out' out, and carrying a pack then I have F.A.Kit, Whistle, compass, firelighting, Knife, saw, etvc., etc., but not one of these wee jokey bits of clutter.

I don't fish, I don't strangle rabbits with wee bits of wire, I don't do the wire saw stuff and button compasses are notoriously unreliable. The candle melts, and the purification tablets go minging.

I'll stick with my assorted bits and pieces knowing that they get redd out and refreshed frequently.

cheers,
Toddy

John Fenna
08-06-2009, 10:11
I dont fish either but I have used the fishing line as a repair for a bag....the snare can also be used in many different scenarios and the candle can be used to ease a saw through damp wood etc- although I agree that the puritabs go off and are pretty useless after a couple of years!
I have "fine tuned" the kit(s) I carry and see them not as "wee jokey bits of clutter" but as compact collections of multi-use "possibles" held in a convenient storage tin. :)
The kits I have (so far) carried on forign expeds have been more useful than the ones I carry in GB.
Not being a handbag user I need somewhere to carry all those little bits and pieces of "might be useful" stuff....
Oh yeah - I have used a survival tins contents to get me through a weekend, but only as an experiment (playing) - not in a real emergency.
I went out with my tin, a Survival Aids emergency ration pack and a vacuum packed survival bag and suffered the w/e away.
The good news is - I survived! :D
I can see why some folk decry the survival tin, but I find it a comfort to have along on wilderness trips and as a supply of "useful bits" in normal activities. :)

rik_uk3
08-06-2009, 19:58
As said, just have stuff on you for the UK anyway. If your off to the rainforest etc you need more gear.

As to a mobile phone being a last resort? Utter tosh, its the first thing after some emergency first aid you would use if T**** and you or a member of your group were injured or indeed if you are lost and can get a signal its a very fast way of getting help (unless your the gung ho type who will soldier on regardless and perhaps hurt yourself or group member even more, perhaps cause a death). Often getting a signal is a matter of moving just a few metres; in my house where I'm sitting now I get full reception, move to the back room three metres away and nothing, walk two metres out the back door and again full signal.

For those going to this years moot where there is "NO signal" , well there is, go by the toilet blocks, the O2 network at least works there.

Calculon
08-06-2009, 20:33
I dont carry one since the time I sliced my finger open trying to get the fishook out of my elbow after rolling about on the floor trying to put myself out after using the bloody matches.

Lucky my missus had her phone....

British Red
08-06-2009, 20:44
As to a mobile phone being a last resort? Utter tosh, its the first thing after some emergency first aid you would use if T**** and you or a member of your group were injured or indeed if you are lost and can get a signal its a very fast way of getting help........ (

As I said - as a last resort (in an emergency) its a useful tool. If you really want to use a mobile phone to resolve "getting lost" well, in my book, there are some better ways to deal with getting lost - now if you meant an emergency AND being lost I concur. But a mobile phone in the UK as a method to resolve being lost (which the statement OR being lost implies) - rather than learning some decent navigation skills and carrying the proper equipment, places the burden of personal irresponsibility on emergency and volunteer services. I'm sure Dartmoor rescue and the like have better things to do with their time than deal with phone calls from the "I can't find my car" brigade

Red

Goatboy
08-06-2009, 21:08
me too :rolleyes:

(good innit? :D)

Absolutely fantastic Bikething... especially when you unplug the landline too :lmao:

Goatboy
08-06-2009, 21:24
I agree the tin can be seen as window dressing, and as Toddy and others say they wouldn't have a use for some of the items within. But it's like a rather plush biker mate of mine. He doesn't take a suitcase on holiday, it's a toothbrush and a credit card. :rolleyes:
I always carry a pocket knife, though most folk don't... but I use it at least a couple of times a day. I also always have a loupe, a lighter ( as well as my fire steel ... it's an aquarian thing) and often wear braces as well as a belt. It's how we live our lives and how we drop those "tools" into them. Someone who lives in a desert may not need wellies, but if you live in a marshy area they're kinda good to have. Also many of the folks here think in different ways to the vanilla non-bushcrafty types and use items in ways they're not designed for. Think of the fisherman who pops his "dreaded" mobile phone into a condom before going fishing so that it doesn't get wet. If you can justify carrying it to yourself then why not? Hey I use cigarette rolling papers as post-a-notes to myself. There's no perfect kit list, just what you can use or apply to a situation.
Goatboy.

rik_uk3
08-06-2009, 21:34
As I said - as a last resort (in an emergency) its a useful tool. If you really want to use a mobile phone to resolve "getting lost" well, in my book, there are some better ways to deal with getting lost - now if you meant an emergency AND being lost I concur. But a mobile phone in the UK as a method to resolve being lost (which the statement OR being lost implies) - rather than learning some decent navigation skills and carrying the proper equipment, places the burden of personal irresponsibility on emergency and volunteer services. I'm sure Dartmoor rescue and the like have better things to do with their time than deal with phone calls from the "I can't find my car" brigade

Red

We will have to agree to differ on this one Red. Our priorities differ.

Goatboy
08-06-2009, 22:02
Hey Rik_uk3,
I work in the outdoor industry and believe me I'd rather almost die than call out the MRT, they'd never let me live it down. :lmao:
Seriously though if you need to call them out, call them out. But remember that the call may not connect. A year or so back when recovering from a virus that damaged my heart I got "caught short" on the hill when an unseasonal winter storm hit. I got off by heading for shelter... slowly. Got myself together and got down. My phone couldn't get a signal to get a pal to come save me. I used a bit of common sense and patience to get out of that one, in the same blizzard a poor lassie was killed not too far away. Yes a mobile is good, we all have accidents... no matter what our skill level, but we can't rely on them. It's like the group in the "Lakes" who were caught short and wondered if the rescue team could drop them off some "carry out food" until they got down. Call if you need, but at least try to have the skills and equipment to save your self. I get too many folk coming in saying " I can't read a map please sell me a GPS". No I wont sell them one, I'd rather they went on a map reading course and I lost a sale.
Goatboy.

rik_uk3
10-06-2009, 00:09
I never said rely on it, but never feel ashamed to use it, its only a tool, same as a map and compass.

BOD
10-06-2009, 04:32
I've had to feed myself with one - not the BCB one but the Australian Mark III.

Apart from clothes and a Mora it was the only bit of kit. Wonderful bit of kit.

Don't knock them

If you have had a meal today an Oxo cube and a glucose tablet seem like nothing.

Walk 20-30 km in the desert without eating and then take a bit of the OXO cube and the pill and you will see the effect. As long as you have water you will be able to think clearly again and get rid of the light-headed feeling.

Then you can remember to start fishing or setting snares.

You can catch fish at waterholes.

swanscot
04-08-2009, 02:36
From a UK point of view (not some parts of Scotland maybe) most of that list would be on you anyway, dump the fishing lines in the UK, waste of space. In the UK these little tins are not really needed, but they are a bit of fun to play with. As mentioned in some of the many, many, many posts about these tins, for UK use carry a mobile phone for one thing, the rest really should be on your belt on in your pockets.


I'm mainly a hillwalker so don't usually carry 'bushcraft' kit when out and about on a day hike. I carry stuff that will help me survive in the mountains: a whistle fastened to my waterproof jacket*; a Silva compass in my rucksack as well as the one I'm using - usually fastened to a belt loop; spare clothing, head torch and a orange 'bivvy' (survival) bag. But up until recently I've never considered fire making or water purifying stuff. However, since looking into survival/bushcraft I carry a wee survival kit. Many of these items are not part of what I would usually carry for a normal day on the hill. .

If I was going out on an overnight walk, I'd would have the essentials for shelter, fire, cooking, water with me and would have no need for the pack, but if I encountered difficulties on a day hike I may call on some of the stuff in this kit. For example, I did a 10 hours walk alone in the Cairngorms last week and for the last 2 - 3 hours I didn't see another soul. If I had twisted my ankle coming down off the hill and could walk, albeit slowly, I would NOT call out the mountain rescue services. I may have had to make an improvised shelter in the pine woods to rest for a few hours overnight and I'm sure I'd have been very glad to be have a firesteel and tinder in this kit to start a small fire for warmth.

* Mobile phone reception is very patchy in many Highland glens and you may have to rely on non-technological means of communication.

He' s left the building
04-08-2009, 11:16
It is a survival kit primarily designed for the general public and is perfect for hikers, scout associations, climbers, anyone who enjoys the outdoors and is also a great starter kit. The Combat Survival Tin's components have been compiled to allow for the individual to maintain a decent standard of survival for 48 -72 hours, while awaiting and aiding rescue.



Has anyone here actually survived 48-72 hours using just the contents of the tin? (and nothing else)

I can almost guarantee nobody reading this forum has (and I'd love to be proven wrong if anyone has actually done exactly that).

I have completed 24+ hours in tropical rainforest on more than one occasion and several unplanned overnighters in mountains (UK and others) but my survival isn't attributable to the contents of a survival tin.

BOD
04-08-2009, 12:25
Has anyone here actually survived 48-72 hours using just the contents of the tin? (and nothing else)

I can almost guarantee nobody reading this forum has (and I'd love to be proven wrong if anyone has actually done exactly that).

I have completed 24+ hours in tropical rainforest on more than one occasion and several unplanned overnighters in mountains (UK and others) but my survival isn't attributable to the contents of a survival tin.

Well if you allow for boots and clothes and what you wear I think you will find that a few people have done just that with the OZ Mk 111 kit which is issued to the military.

There is also a survival course and a 200km walk through the WA desert relying on the tins contents to catch fish, collect water start fire etc. etc.

Its not actauuly tin but plastic hence it does not rust like the BCB one and the contents are more comprehensive.

He' s left the building
04-08-2009, 14:30
Well if you allow for boots and clothes and what you wear I think you will find that a few people have done just that...

That is my point exactly BOD, I am asking who can attribute their survival to the contents of the tin alone.

People survive due to a combination of luck, skill, clothing/footwear worn, etc.

The contents of the tin rarely enable survival, survival is attributable to other factors.

BushcraftBaird112
04-08-2009, 16:56
People survive due to a combination of luck, skill, clothing/footwear worn, etc.

The contents of the tin rarely enable survival, survival is attributable to other factors.


In a survival situation clothing and footwear won't start a fire or purify water when you need it! Knowledge is very important but second to knowledge is equipment. Thats what the whole idea of the survival tin is all about; to have things that are the hardest to replace in the wilderness.

He' s left the building
04-08-2009, 17:33
Without adequate clothing you wouldn't survive long enough to need fire and water.

Why does the tin contain water sterilising tablets but no water container? Wouldn't it make sense to use a one-litre tin as the container, that way the container itself could be used to hold and treat water? The tablets treat one-litre, so there's no use adding a tablet to 100ml water in a small tin (anyone who thinks a condom is suitable for holding/treating viable amounts of water in survival situations either has never practised this or is living in cloud cuckoo land!)

He' s left the building
04-08-2009, 17:37
anyone who thinks a condom is suitable for holding/treating viable amounts of water in survival situations either has never practised this or is living in cloud cuckoo land!

I know I'm quoting myself here, but anyone who thinks a small tin this size would be useful to boil viable amounts of water in a survival situation is also deluding themselves.

Much better to make a kit in a larger tin which would actually be useful.

SMARTY
04-08-2009, 18:11
I have to agree there. Survival tins can be an exercise in how many items can be crammed into a tabacco tin. With that in mind most of the said items are miniture or of fewer quantity than actually needed. Also I agree with the mobile phone as a means of alerting rescue agencies. I carry a PLB in my kit. Every environment will need the contents of the tin to be adapted etc. My kit is layered and carried as required.I have had the chance to study a lot of survival kits from military ejection seat contents to liferaft kits. Personally I'm not a fan of miniture items. A recent study concluded that the average time to rescue from notification is 48 hours. With that in mind my survival kit contents concentrates on shelter fire and signalling for rescue. Pack your own kit and practice with it.

BushcraftBaird112
04-08-2009, 18:33
Your not supposed to boil the water in the tin your supposed to purify it the 2 litre bag that is shown in the picture.

BushcraftBaird112
04-08-2009, 18:44
And to be honest I dont really carry a survival tin for means of survival. Its more of a back-up kit those moments such as “what was that cracking sound” as you stand on your compass or “where did I put those matches”.

On the link below there is a page showing an emergency kit like I have descibed.

http://www.woodcraftwanderings.org/equipment.html#EmergencyKit

He' s left the building
04-08-2009, 20:19
Survival tins can be an exercise in how many items can be crammed into a tabacco tin. With that in mind most of the said items are miniture or of fewer quantity than actually needed...

That's also my main reason for not liking these kits, I was once 'advised' to buy one until a mate put me straight and told me that if all I needed was the knife and matches, I should just take a proper knife and a lighter. We were in a tropical climate at the time and therefore didn't need to consider taking any shelter or water. This would obviously be different if we were in the desert/woodland/mountain/etc.

I'm also of the opinion that any 'back-up' or emergency items should be of the usual quality/size/etc. Condoms for water carrying, space-blankets for shelter, tiny penknives for heavy use, etc would be next to useless in most situations.

Of the times I've been in real danger, once was at -14C in Bavaria and I didn't have a jacket, another was over 47C in the desert and my engine coolant-pump cracked, a survival tin wouldn't have been of any immediate use in either situation.

The origins of these kits is military E&E and therefore the starting point is that the evader would be dressed and carrying the usual accoutrements (water-bottle, poncho, bayonet,etc). To market these kits as complete survival kits is therefore based on a flawed concept.

What does Mors Kochanski recommend? Firstly, he specifies the environment (boreal forest) and then he selects full sized 'common or garden' utility items (knife, billy-can, warm jacket). Baccy tins are for baccy!

sandbender
04-08-2009, 20:36
"...Baccy tins are for baccy!..."

I keep a first aid kit in my baccy tin. ;)

He' s left the building
04-08-2009, 20:42
I keep a first aid kit in my baccy tin. ;)



The intended use of the contents of the baccy tin (smokes) will kill you, so I suppose I'm happy with your first-aid kit! :)

Baccy tins are for Band-Aids? :)

Hangman
16-08-2009, 01:57
I did my aircrew survival cadre with the aircrew survival kit (not too disimilar from the Lofty Wiseman kit) (the old one not the current issue one).

With a decent knife and knowledge it will help keep you alive.

I can see why there might be some feeling about the mobile phone issue, many fools I helped pull of the hills often had naff all to help or prevent there situation such as warm, and / or wet weather clothing or map or compass but many had a mobile as some sort of talisman that they assumed would summon some instant International Rescue type mob.

When they found that they had no signal and had to rely on being declared overdue or one having to wander of the hills to raise the alarm thye found out realities of searching for someone, as good as RAF SAR are we could take our time of we had to perform a full on search for lack of knowledge of our call's location.

He' s left the building
16-08-2009, 16:18
... many fools I helped pull of the hills often had naff all to help or prevent there situation such as warm, and / or wet weather clothing or map or compass but many had a mobile ...


In that situation, a 'survival-tin' would have been as much use as a mobile with a flat battery and no signal, ie very little.

'Prevention' kit: map and compass.

'Survival' kit: warm/waterproof clothing and footwear.

He' s left the building
16-08-2009, 16:26
And to be honest I dont really carry a survival tin for means of survival. Its more of a back-up kit those moments such as “what was that cracking sound” as you stand on your compass or “where did I put those matches”.

On the link below there is a page showing an emergency kit like I have descibed.

http://www.woodcraftwanderings.org/equipment.html#EmergencyKit

I hope that you don't take my comments the wrong way, but you appear to have cut and paste your comment above from the website link?

In addition, your original post, ie the 'review' of this product is not much more than a cut-and-paste from the retail advertising blurb of the product?

Have you got any commercial interests in the sale of this product?

BushcraftBaird112
17-08-2009, 17:37
I cut and pasted the review to give the viewers the basic facts and then I just wanted to see what there opinions were on the product. And not in any part of promoting its sales.

Mistwalker
17-08-2009, 21:34
..... but I have managed to instantly kill at least one mobile phone by falling into water with it......

That's where these come in handy :D and here's a link to the review I did on my first one.

http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=38045


http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn283/mistwalker13/pelican%20waterproof%20boxes/PICT0066.jpg

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn283/mistwalker13/pelican%20waterproof%20boxes/PICT0022.jpg

Bumpy
17-08-2009, 21:43
How do you manage to press the buttons and speak into it when it's in that case?!:D

Tengu
18-08-2009, 11:20
This Aussie mk 3, what does it contain?

Says she the list junkie

Bumpy
18-08-2009, 20:25
Tengu - In answer to your question about contents of the kit you may find this link useful:

http://www.equipped.org/cooperkit.htm

Cheers!