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m.durston
20-02-2009, 21:38
hi all,
whilst i was at work today i was refilling a pay & display machine which is located next to the river ver in st albans. i happened to notice a fairly large signal crayfish at the edge of the bank in the shallows.
catching the little bugger wouldnt have been much of an issue as my colleague does it with some line and bits of spam! but after a bit of research i've found you need a licence to catch them along with permission from the landowner.
i dont think permission will be a problem as my works are in 'partnership' with the local council and i have access to the relevant people.
does anyone on here have one of these licences and how easy is it to obtain one?

Mesquite
20-02-2009, 22:12
Other people have asked the same question MD and here's one thread on the subject of getting a licence (http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/showthread.php?p=440653#post44 0653).

On another note, if you go down to Verulanium park there's loads in the river there leading up to the Fighting Cocks from the watermill. Last time I walked along there I counted at least 15 of the little beggars.

m.durston
20-02-2009, 22:30
thats exactly where i was!! cheers for the link the search engine on here is pants.

Melonfish
20-02-2009, 23:09
it does make me laugh we need a licence to fish an alien species out of our own waters. but then thats great british beaurocracy for you.

gunslinger
20-02-2009, 23:33
To catch them with meat or an old chicken carcass you do not need a licence but it is illegal to put them back.

You will need a licence however to trap them ie.with a pot or net trap.
It is nigh on impossible to get a licence , I have tried recently. They will not accept eating them as a reason to trap,you could try research as a reason but I think you would have to prove that.
I can only speak for my area as I am told all are different,however I have never met or spoken to on any forum ,anyone who has been successful in obtaining a licence.

Not very positive but that's my experience.

I agree its a total nonsense but that's England for you:rolleyes:

GS

m.durston
21-02-2009, 07:27
gunslinger your absolutely right, i have researched this a little more and i think one of the deciding factors on issueing said licence is the area your operating in and the severity of the infestation!
apparently the river ver no longer has any native white claw crayfish as the signal crayfish have wiped them out.
its a real shame cos the river ver was so full of rubbish etc in the 80's that i only ever saw stickleback in there. now in the summer i always see trout etc.

Stanleythecat
21-02-2009, 07:54
I was talking to an ecologist at work yesterday about this. We have a load of traps for survey work so I asked whether they could be used, she said it was a good idea but you would need a license. Her main concern was that people would be able to identify the signals over the white clawed.

Gwhtbushcraft
21-02-2009, 10:25
I got a trap at the midlands game fair.. i havn't tried getting a licence (I havn't used it) but i read that another concern is that when the dominant males...often the first to be caught..are removed and the trapping is not done regulary it allows the others to surge and thrive.
George

badgeringtim
22-04-2010, 15:57
There are a few issues with trapping - several to do with other species welfare.
Many traps sold are actually illegal to use as the size of apature is to large and other non target (but protected) species can become trapped and killed in them, also there are hygene and crayfish pluage considerations as well as the basic identification.
The licence is a mechanism of keeping track of this.

So what seems to be OTT on the surface, when you understand it makes much better sence. Se the other thread here for someone who made the mistake when identifying and got signals confused with natives and ended up in court.

Kerne
22-04-2010, 17:03
OK - so I'm out fishing (with permission, licence etc.) and I dangle some meaty treat into the water and pull out some signal crayfish. Can I now safely, and without fear of conviction, cook them up and eat them? Is it that simple?

tytek
22-04-2010, 17:13
OK - so I'm out fishing (with permission, licence etc.) and I dangle some meaty treat into the water and pull out some signal crayfish. Can I now safely, and without fear of conviction, cook them up and eat them? Is it that simple?

Yep, they are very tasty!!!

EdS
22-04-2010, 17:35
the there are 2 main reasons for the licence:

1) to stop trapping of the natives. You will not get a licence for an area with a know population of natives.

2) to protect otters. With the increase in otters there has also been an increase in the number of otter drownded in traps. THe licence requires the entrance of the trap to be no more than 90mm in diametre - this size so it is too small for an otter to get its head in.

Part of the problem is due to TV prgrams and t'net telling the publci to go catch them, with out them having a clue what they are doing.

Not stupid bureaucracy but to ensure sensible control to prevent impact on other species.

In reality you are unlikely to get an EA licence for any waters north of the Trent due to populations of natives in northern rivers.

however, "rod and line" ie string and meat is fine with rod licence and land owners permission.

Or just go wit ha kids fishing rod and lift rocks - even easier, if 3 year old can catch them like that adults should be able to.


also the consensus is now that trapping unless done to remove the entire population makes the problem worse. Trapping disproptionally, removes the larger aggressive males. These are carnivorous - and the main control on the population. Removing these large males has a 2 fold impact -

1) it allows more smaller once to bread resulting an overall higher population.

2) the void left for the "alpha" males is filled by males moving in from other areas, increasing the spread of the fungal disease, that kills natives, from infected areas.

Also one of the conditions is that traps are sterilised before each use, to reduce spreading the disease and eggs.

Everything Mac
26-04-2010, 17:34
out of interest what is the penalty for trapping without a license?

wattsy
26-04-2010, 18:12
out of interest what is the penalty for trapping without a license?

they get very angry, and they write you a letter telling you how angry they are.

actually i don't know

nuggets
26-04-2010, 18:50
they get very angry, and they write you a letter telling you how angry they are.

actually i don't know

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cumbria/8618142.stm

:rolleyes:

Toddy
26-04-2010, 18:53
out of interest what is the penalty for trapping without a license?

About 50 a crayfish iirc.

cheers,
M

FreddyFish
26-04-2010, 19:04
National crayfish trapping byelaws
On 1 June 2005, the Environment Agency introduced a package of crayfish Byelaws that will allow them, under certain conditions, to approve the trapping of crayfish in England and Wales. In the past only the Thames Region of the Environment Agency had the authority to allow this activity.

The hope is that the byelaws will aid in the control non-native populations, and where appropriate, commercially exploit them. They also hope that these byelaws will go some way towards protecting the remaining native crayfish populations.

If you are thinking of trapping crayfish you should bear in mind that there are a number of conditions that need to be met. Permission to trap will be dependent on local situations, in particular the presence of the native crayfish. The EA will also take into account the possible detrimental effect that trapping could have on other species, such as protected animals like otters and water voles. Many water courses go through private properties and it will be your responsibility to obtain the permission of the landowner before you commence. You should also try and ensure that the traps are inspected every 24 hours, and disinfected after use.

You should also be aware that if you reintroduce the caught crayfish into any other waters, without the required licence, you could be liable for prosecution under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and this could result in a heavy fine.

We would strongly advise you to seek advice from your local Environment Agency Officer before you make an application.

Crayfish trapping advice packs are available from the National Fisheries Laboratory 01480 483968. Further information on these byelaws can be found on the Environment Agency website.

="http://www.defra.gov.uk/foodfarm/fisheries/freshwater/crayfish.htm#ISSUE"]
http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/

Cledan99
02-05-2010, 06:59
I caught some whilst fly fishing!!! they hooked on to my line and wouldn't let go the guy at the fishery trapped them (under licence) and said we were to stamp on them - this seemed a waste, so my m8 reintroduced them to other waters....


Boiling on his stove, and very nice they were too

charlieh
02-05-2010, 10:45
http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=56130

here is another current thread on crayfish, which has several good links in it,

m.durston
04-06-2010, 14:16
hi all, well its finally happened! i sent an email well over 6 months ago to my local council regarding trapping and didnt hear anything back until today.
apparently the old boy in charge of parks etc had retired so they were working their way through the list of unaswered emails! anyways i got chatting to this guy who is now in charge and he has provisionally given me permission to trap american signal crayfish in the river and lakes down in st albans. he is going to send out a permission letter from st albans council to me in the next few days and i should (fingers crossed) be trapping in a few weeks.

i will be posting photos of my exploits in trapping these tasty little monsters in the near future.

EdS
04-06-2010, 14:51
not wanting to spoil things but all that letter gives you is land owners permission to trap - so don't forget your EA license.

m.durston
04-06-2010, 19:01
never fear i have been in contact with them already and i'm in the process of filling in the new form they brought out specifically for trapping crayfish :) it was just the permission from the landowner that has previously hampered my efforts.
http://www.efishbusiness.co.uk/formsandguides/cr1.pdf

TJRoots
04-06-2010, 23:52
fishing is one of the oldest and most reliable ways of gathering food, we've been doing it for many a millenia and it has always been an important part of life that EVERYONE knew how to do and most people had to do to feed their families.

now we arent allowed to do it without paying for a license. stupid modern life.

TJ

Chinkapin
05-06-2010, 05:32
I think I may have posted this little tidbit once before in another thread, but regardless, I'll do it again. If you are planning on fishing for crayfish the simplest setup is the old fashioned cane (bamboo) pole. Just tie on a length of line sufficient for the depth of the water, no reel necessary at all. On the end of your line, tightly tie a small piece of bacon rind. Be sure it is the rind, and not just a piece of bacon. Bacon rind is incredibly tough and will stand up to many, many crayfish grabbing on with out any loss.

Also, it just seems to be a crayfish magnet. Many people though out the South have fished for crayfish (crawdads) in this manner for many years. I can personally attest that it works remarkably well. When I was a boy and we wanted large numbers of crayfish, fast, we just seined them out using a minnow seine. We never trapped them.

They are not protected here at all, and there is no limit on amount taken. No license or permit is required.

m.durston
05-06-2010, 08:13
i heard this about bacon from a mate, its definitely one of the methods i'll be trying. also as a note i have used the remnants of last nights kfc to lure them before lol

m.durston
19-06-2010, 08:29
i am now fully legal!!! as promised i got my letter from the relevant guys at the council and i now have my licence from the EA along with all the tags etc for the traps.
went out last night and set two traps, one in the lake and the other in the river. the lake one was empty but i did catch 4 in the river trap so i dont think thats too bad for a first go lol

Mesquite
19-06-2010, 08:35
i am now fully legal!!! as promised i got my letter from the relevant guys at the council and i now have my licence from the EA along with all the tags etc for the traps.
went out last night and set two traps, one in the lake and the other in the river. the lake one was empty but i did catch 4 in the river trap so i dont think thats too bad for a first go lol

Congratulations on getting the licence etc.

I take it you're doing the trapping night time only so you don't upset the locals :rolleyes:

m.durston
19-06-2010, 13:50
Congratulations on getting the licence etc.

I take it you're doing the trapping night time only so you don't upset the locals :rolleyes:
your right in thinking i'm only going out at night, i know what thieving gits some of the local scallies are lol. also i actually made a point of laminating the consent letter and the licence just in case i get stopped. i went out at around 11pm last night thinking that the area would be deserted...... dog walkers everywhere lol
i ended up chatting with a couple who were being led about by a couple of irish wolfhounds and they were as good as gold about it all, but i do expect to explain what i am doing every now and again.
although i must admit i did get a bit of hassle whilst walking by the river, namely being divebombed by bats! i did resist the urge to scream like a girl and shout "RABIES!!!"

pango
03-07-2010, 14:53
my m8 reintroduced them to other waters....
Not only criminal but despicable, Cledan!

I realise it was probably done without malicious intent, I have myself introduced pike, perch and trout to waters, but it has been pretty much proved that American signal crayfish have been spread in Scotland by gangs hoping to benefit from sales to restaurants. I can think of no other explanation for the appearance of these aliens to rivers from the Borders to the Highlands.

A number of restaurants have been done for passing them off as lobster or prawns and the only way I can see to eradicate this is to ban retailing them. One thing I am certain of is that encouraging a market in them will do nothing more than guarantee their thriving future.

I'm not so certain that the reluctance to issue permits is entirely to protect other species but rather to protect landowner's rights. There have been at least two Scottish Estates which have refused access to the Environmental Agency. Three years down the line, instead of instantly seeking a compulsory order, they're still discussing what to do about it.

Fishery Protection Orders, initiated for the Tay system, now encompass almost every river in Scotland with a salmon run. And where they were originally supposed to protect salmon stocks, their immediate effect was to eliminate fishing for any species, including trout, grayling and even pike on salmon rivers, as people who had no interest in salmon were soon being arrested under the legislation. I have yet to hear of a single conviction for taking fish, other than migratory salmonidae, from a river under a Protection Order, leading to my belief that the legislation is flawed and results in a monumental waste of Court time and resources!

It was never anything more than a Landowner Protection Racket, and the same legislation will result in your arrest if you even attempt to remove what has been identified as the biggest single threat to salmon stocks ever, the American signal crayfish!

pango
03-07-2010, 15:06
although i must admit i did get a bit of hassle whilst walking by the river, namely being divebombed by bats! i did resist the urge to scream like a girl and shout "RABIES!!!"

Now that was funny! :rofl:

JonathanD
03-07-2010, 15:06
Not only criminal but despicable, Cledan!



Re-read his post and you'll see that the waters he introduced them too were boiling in a pan. He didn't let them go into the wild, but ate 'em.

pango
03-07-2010, 15:14
Ahhh hah! :tapedshut: My apologies, Cledan.

JonathanD
03-07-2010, 15:18
Ahhh hah! :tapedshut: My apologies, Cledan.

I was almost caught out with it too :lmao:

somersetlady
19-07-2010, 21:15
Please help me!
I cant seem to get a clear answer do i need a licence to take a group of children with beach nets to the river to cray fish?
We will not be using any traps.

EdS
19-07-2010, 21:33
Please help me!
I cant seem to get a clear answer do i need a licence to take a group of children with beach nets to the river to cray fish?
We will not be using any traps.

no you don't but you must have the landowners permission to take any and make sure you know the difference between natives and other species. And the nets must be properly sterilised - not just dried, between visits to prevent the spread of the fungal disease that is a major threat to natives.

somersetlady
19-07-2010, 22:30
many thanks that makes things a lot clearer!
The river is overrun with american signal cray fish and lots of people fish it for cray fish.
Was a little worried about the lack of licence so thanks for the info!

somersetlady
20-07-2010, 13:16
Hi sorry to ask again but i have now been told by the enviroment agency that i do need a licence to take a group of children cray fishing. Am getting a little confused. what is the penalty for cray fishing without a licence? i have run out of time now so will not be able to get a licence.

Bushwhacker
20-07-2010, 13:43
I'm sure the law is more to do with using set traps above anything else.
As far as anyone is concerned, you were down at the stream trying to catch sticklebacks in a hand net and a crayfish just happened to walk into the net.
Any authority that would act on that and deny kids some quality education needs a 'check up from the neck up'

As the law stands though, you can only remove non-native species and there is a NO RETURN policy on this, they must be killed.
I'm pretty sure that you can't store or transport live non-native species either.

_scorpio_
20-07-2010, 17:30
oh dear... i have done something illegal by accident then! using a sardine to catch...well anything fishy at the weekend i saw a cray and (having never seen one before) got ultra excited and cast on to it. a net and 5 mins later i had it, photographed it, and returned it. i wasnt sure how to tell them apart (i assume the red under the claws is how you tell but to be sure it went back). it was blooming huge! i thought they were just glorified shrimp but it must have been the best part of a foot from claw to tail!
got to try catching them now!
oh, and to those who trap crays, do you get many that are too small to eat? and if so what happens to them?

_scorpio_
20-07-2010, 17:42
i am planning to ask the correct authorities about using yoyo reels to fish for crays... if you had say 15 of them all along the bank or in a tree you could just sit back and relax and wait for them to come flying in and just net them once they reach you. you could also modify them to have a net attached so when they reel in the crays are netted too...
now i just need to find somewhere local with an infestation... anyone know of anywhere in the kent/east sussex area?

JonathanD
20-07-2010, 18:50
i am planning to ask the correct authorities about using yoyo reels to fish for crays... if you had say 15 of them all along the bank or in a tree you could just sit back and relax and wait for them to come flying in and just net them once they reach you. you could also modify them to have a net attached so when they reel in the crays are netted too...
now i just need to find somewhere local with an infestation... anyone know of anywhere in the kent/east sussex area?

Yoyo reels are are a big no no as they don't discrimminate with species. Although it's quite funny to think of a line of these along the bank triggering at intervals with ginormous crayfish winging their way through the air.

It is also illegal to return any American signal crayfish caught, so the smaller ones have to be dispatched if no good for eating.

m.durston
20-07-2010, 21:08
Hi sorry to ask again but i have now been told by the enviroment agency that i do need a licence to take a group of children cray fishing. Am getting a little confused. what is the penalty for cray fishing without a licence? i have run out of time now so will not be able to get a licence.

i believe the penalty for catching crayfish without a licence can be pretty steep. there was a link somewhere on here to a news article about a fella who got caught up in cumbria trapping native crayfish whilst on holiday. i believe the bloke got a 4000 fine for what he saw as a harmless fishing outing.

i've just looked at the form i had to fill out for my licence http://www.efishbusiness.co.uk/formsandguides/cr1.pdf and it does ask you to state what method you will be using to catch the non native crayfish ie trap, hand net etc.
you also have to fill out a form when the licence runs out detailing exactly what species you have caught, numbers, days trapping etc so the EA can keep tabs on population levels.
i know this has put a bit of a downer on your plans but it really isnt worth getting caught and being made an example of.

if you are serious about getting legit then the following points outlined below will ensure your success for the future.

1) find the landowner for the stretch of water/river you are planning to catch in and inquire whether they have fishing rights for the water and whether they would mind you fishing there.

2) phone up the EA and find out whether the crayfish infestation in that area is considered bad enough for them to grant a licence. i did this and they confirmed i would be granted a licence as long as i had landowner permission.
they will also know whether any native crayfish are in situ, bear in mind if there are native crayfish then a licence will not be granted.

3) if both above points are approved then you go out and find some crayfish traps that are within the legal dimensions as stated on the cr1 form (dont buy them yet!!!!). they have to be a certain size so any curious otters wont get their heads caught in the entrances and drown.

4) fill out the form and send it away to the EA along with your landowners permission letter. mine only took a week to come back with the tags that you attach to the traps.

5) buy your traps and start reaping the rewards :)

also as a footnote there are quite a few collapsible traps being flogged on ebay that have oversized entrances, this is easy to rectify just by cutting the wire frame down to size and securing with cable ties.

TomBartlett
21-07-2010, 01:04
How does one tell the difference between the white-clawed and signals?

Ruvio
21-07-2010, 01:29
Signals are huge, white clawed are tidgy :)
Also a good indicator in my experience, Signal are muddier in colour than white clawed.

If you've got andy worries as to what it is though, you're best of asking a professional..or maybe post a pic here.

It's illegal to put a signal back, and I'm pretty sure it's now illegal to eat a white clawed as they're protected. Or in the process of becoming protected. not sure

happy huntin!

m.durston
21-07-2010, 07:43
Signals are huge, white clawed are tidgy :)
Also a good indicator in my experience, Signal are muddier in colour than white clawed.

If you've got andy worries as to what it is though, you're best of asking a professional..or maybe post a pic here.

It's illegal to put a signal back, and I'm pretty sure it's now illegal to eat a white clawed as they're protected. Or in the process of becoming protected. not sure

happy huntin!
the guy who was prosecuted and fined was catching the native white claw, so yes i would definitely say they are protected lol
here is a handy guide for identifying crayfish from the EA http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/static/documents/Leisure/Crayfish_Identify.pdf

Bushwhacker
21-07-2010, 09:50
I know some people who have confused a signal for a white-claw because the signals have a little white patch on the top of the claws where the joint is.

_scorpio_
21-07-2010, 10:46
so white claws dont have white claws but red claws like signals?

Bushwhacker
21-07-2010, 11:32
so white claws dont have white claws but red claws like signals?

No, I'm just saying that the signals have a little white flash on the topside of the claw at the base of the pincer joint.
It's another defining feature for them and shouldn't confuse you into thinking it's a white-claw just because it has a bit of white on it.

The white claw is creamy coloured underneath and is in much lighter contrast to the topside.

*Edit* I should also add that a lot of crays can lose their whole claws in battle, so you also need to identify them in ways other than the claws.

m.durston
21-07-2010, 15:26
also its worth noting on the american signal crayfish that little white flash on the topside of the claw at the joint is sometimes a turquiose colour on the larger specimens. and before i forget, the signals act like they have sunk 10 pints of stella and are extremely aggressive! its almost like they are permanently wanting to have a barney with anything that comes within reach. the last catch i had (around 30) i stuck in a storage box with a built in lid, and everytime my two year old went over and lifted the lid it was like a mini mexican claw wave lol

_scorpio_
21-07-2010, 16:16
white flash like this?
http://i36.servimg.com/u/f36/12/26/74/68/canon_15.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=145&u=12267468)
by the join in the pincer you mean?

andy_e
21-07-2010, 16:33
Edit: oops - misread date/time of post

Bushwhacker
21-07-2010, 16:58
white flash like this?
http://i36.servimg.com/u/f36/12/26/74/68/canon_15.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=145&u=12267468)
by the join in the pincer you mean?

Yeah, like that.

_scorpio_
21-07-2010, 17:57
much easier to look under the claws...
http://i36.servimg.com/u/f36/12/26/74/68/canon_16.jpg (http://www.servimg.com/image_preview.php?i=146&u=12267468)
not my best photo but it was getting out of the net fast and i wasn't too tempted to pick it up!

m.durston
21-07-2010, 18:26
you can pick them up by the body, they cant quite reach your hand but they give it a good go! also some crayfish will freak out and flap their tails really fast when you pick them up, scares the bejesus out of you when they do it and you will drop it the first time lol

Bushwhacker
22-07-2010, 08:47
you can pick them up by the body, they cant quite reach your hand but they give it a good go! also some crayfish will freak out and flap their tails really fast when you pick them up, scares the bejesus out of you when they do it and you will drop it the first time lol

Yep, the part of the body you want to hold is where the claw arms go into the body.
Bridge it by using your index finger and thumb and pick them up from behind otherwise they will retreat back with claws waving if you try to approach them with your hand from the front.

Cooper90
05-08-2010, 22:53
http://www.ukcamo.com/Items/large-lobster-pot?sck=58155029&caSKU=large-lobster-pot&caTitle=Large%20Lobster%20Pot

4.99

mike1727
29-05-2012, 23:48
Are you still fishing for crayfish in the Ver? I live in St Albans and like he idea, would be good to have a chat about who to get n touch with and possibly see how it's done?

mikeeb123
11-06-2012, 13:09
Hi mike1727, did you have any luck looking in to getting your licence/contacting any landowners for permission? Would be interested to hear as I am also looking to do this?

shootfive
12-06-2012, 09:42
Just to butt into this thread - I've sent off my application this morning. The local river (R. Witham) was a significant ground for our native species however there was talk from the E.A. that the signal crays had taken over several tributaries to the main river. Obviously some sort of spread is inevitable so I may be granted permission to trap them there.

We will see; I'll update this thread when I hear anything.

shootfive
12-06-2012, 09:43
http://www.ukcamo.com/Items/large-lobster-pot?sck=58155029&caSKU=large-lobster-pot&caTitle=Large Lobster Pot

4.99

It may be worth checking the opening diameter (not listed on that site) and whether this is 'otter-friendly' - when applying you have to specify the dimensions of your trap and there are (rightly) quite strict guidelines to protect other species.

Bushwhacker
12-06-2012, 09:54
It may be worth checking the opening diameter (not listed on that site) and whether this is 'otter-friendly' - when applying you have to specify the dimensions of your trap and there are (rightly) quite strict guidelines to protect other species.

It's not otter friendly.

shootfive
14-06-2012, 12:23
Just to butt into this thread - I've sent off my application this morning. The local river (R. Witham) was a significant ground for our native species however there was talk from the E.A. that the signal crays had taken over several tributaries to the main river. Obviously some sort of spread is inevitable so I may be granted permission to trap them there.

We will see; I'll update this thread when I hear anything.

Well, my application has been received and has been passed to the man in charge locally. They've forwarded his details should I wish to discuss it/ask for more information.

We will see.

Dannytsg
14-06-2012, 13:21
Good luck with your application then.

shootfive
14-06-2012, 22:01
Well, an update.

I had a very quick and helpful response from the local man at the Environment Agency. Basically, my application for removing crays for personal consumption has been turned down as the specific stretch of river I requested is a hot spot for the native crays (and that's obviously fair enough, the whole idea is to improve their chances so I don't want to tamper with that) - he did however recommend some specific stretches of water where the EA are aware that the signal crays have basically taken over. He said if I wanted to proceed with my application based on those stretches of water he would get the application through ASAP.

Very helpful, very quick, just a shame the river that is almost on my back doorstep is a no-go.

Dan J
01-10-2012, 22:18
Has anyone heard of any in shropshire/Herefordshire? have heard there's some in the lugg but don't know where.

munkiboi182
01-10-2012, 22:58
just out of interest, would a crab line work for catching crayfish???

jemma555845
02-09-2013, 00:10
Hi does anyone know of where to go to catch Crayfish in Berks/Bucks?

Paddytray
02-09-2013, 09:37
I never knew you need a licence to catch signal crays .
When I was a pub chef the local fishing folk and farmers used to set out traps.
And I would cook them up as bar snacks .
I think it is a joke that we would need a licence to catch something so detrimental to our native water life .

General Strike
02-09-2013, 10:16
What with the native crayfish being so rare, the licensing is really just to stop people scoffing them by accident.

Paddytray
02-09-2013, 10:20
That's a good point but surely it would be better to educate rather than go the licensing route. And probably cheaper all round .

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Paddytray
02-09-2013, 10:24
Yes a crabline will work with a bit of spam . But less productive than a pot with a tin of cat food with holes in it :D. As for berks , bucks area . I am in Basingstoke so just down the road and I know reading waters have many .
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Toddy
02-09-2013, 10:25
There's another huge issue, quite apart from the legal permission to fish, one; there's a disease carried by some populations of the signal crayfish and it destroys the native crayfish. Restricting the cross pollution of one site to another is vital in the attempts to curb the disease.
So someone wandering around collecting from all over the place and not decontaminating kit is actually a disease vector and potentially responsible for wiping out the native crayfish.

cheers,
Toddy

Nice65
02-09-2013, 10:47
Hi does anyone know of where to go to catch Crayfish in Berks/Bucks?

Post #64. You need a license, and will get good advice on avoiding becoming a disease vector from the Environment Agency.

Personally I think they taste awful and muddy. Give me a decent sea caught scampi anyday.

santaman2000
02-09-2013, 16:55
.....Personally I think they taste awful and muddy. Give me a decent sea caught scampi anyday.

You aren't seasoning them right. Use loads of Cajun seasoning in the boil:

Start by bringing about 3 to 4 gallons of water to a rolling boil and adding a minimum of a half cup (a full cup is better) of good Cajun Crab Boil seasoning (my favorite is Zararain's) and three or 4 onions (cut in halves) When water is boiling, add:

-A pound of New Potatoes
-A dozen ears of Corn on the Cob
-2 pounds of live Crawfish
-A half dozen Lemons or Limes (cut in halves)

Let boil for about 10-15 minutes and drain and spread the whole thing out loosely on the table (be sure to cover the table with newspaper or craft paper first)
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3123/2308593614_58c453b032_z.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/24403475@N08/2308593614/)


Surround the table with people and enjoy.

Clouston98
02-09-2013, 17:01
Wow that looks like a really tasty feast you've go there.

santaman2000
02-09-2013, 17:06
LOL. It's a random pic, but they are great this way; a commonunity crawfish boil just like a crab boil, etc.

Clouston98
02-09-2013, 17:09
Ah right but yes they do sound tasty done like that!

santaman2000
03-09-2013, 04:59
They are when done this way. Nice65 had a valid point if they're cooked plain. They need the heavy seasoning. And the festive mood when cooking in quantity like this for a group is hard to beat.

Another good way to eat them is cooked into etoufee. I've never cooked it myself but it's delicious when I've had it from others. The restaurants aren't giving up their recipes but here's a recipe I found online (be advised, when they sy crawfish tails, they mean tails that have already been peeled) www.crawfish.com/crawfish-etouffee

mountainm
03-09-2013, 07:24
They are when done this way. Nice65 had a valid point if they're cooked plain. They need the heavy seasoning. And the festive mood when cooking in quantity like this for a group is hard to beat.

Another good way to eat them is cooked into etoufee. I've never cooked it myself but it's delicious when I've had it from others. The restaurants aren't giving up their recipes but here's a recipe I found online (be advised, when they sy crawfish tails, they mean tails that have already been peeled) www.crawfish.com/crawfish-etouffee

Good to see that Worcestershire sauce has made it to the bayous.

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santaman2000
03-09-2013, 12:54
Good to see that Worcestershire sauce has made it to the bayous.

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It's been over here while; over a century at least. But most Americans still can't pronounce it right. LOL