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Which Silky saw?

Discussion in 'Edged Tools' started by Samon, Dec 6, 2019.

  1. Samon

    Samon Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Yo, as per title which Silky saw is best? Are all the blades made the same and only differ in length a what I assume is teeth per square inch?

    Anyway, originally I was looking for a bow saw but I can't find what I'm after for a reasonable price and don't want to make one so I guess I could try out a silky saw. Everyone seems to rave about them and evidently they cut very well. I have one of those laplander saws that I've had for years and although it's very good for its size it is limited and recently proved to be quite a chore cutting a 5"-6" thick blackthorn trunk. I've used it plenty and it's good for smaller stuff but realistically I have less use for small stuff ATM and my projects often require bigger thicker cuts.

    So which size is the best all rounder? I want one bigger than the laplander and I want a folding model. And I cut green and called half cured wood. Mostly going to cut the tougher stuff so which blade/teeth for that?

    And are they ultimately the best folding saws? Any bad points?

    Cheers
     
  2. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

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    If there was one Silky that was best, there would only be one Silky. Silky also make some very specialised saws for marquetry and very accurate work, like making the wooden puzzle boxes.

    For some, folding is what they want. I have a Super Accel for pocketing in the woods in case I see a Hazel knobstick in the making, or a straight Blackthorn stem. But my main camp user is the hook bladed Zubat or straight bladed BigBoy. Zubat is firm favourite really, it’s a fixed blade with a strong plastic sheath that’ll allow you to secure it and never have to put it down to pick up all your logs or thinnings to carry back.
     
  3. Mark Baigent

    Mark Baigent Full Member

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  4. mikehill

    mikehill Full Member

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    I use the Ultra Accel Curve at work and have just cut down 75m of overgrown beech hedge with it. Some of it was 15cm thick and it was like a knife through butter. Still as sharp as before I started. So good I’m buying one for myself.
     
  5. sunndog

    sunndog Full Member

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    Super accel or big boy for a folder. If you want it for firewood go for a fixed blade.

    For general use any nice65 listed will do you up a treat. The only thing I would say worth considering is a straight blade is better for a general purpose saw and the curved ones better for pruning. You get more saw for your money with a fixed blade
    I'd personally always buy the most aggressive toothed version for anything you are likely to be doing with one (don't tell anyone but I fitted a kitchen worktop with my best sugoi once, don't ask why either lol)

    Yes they are the best saws. Samurai are good too but you can tell it's not a silky
    Drawbacks? not as tough as a laplander but they survive well in the hands of full time arborists (and one time kitchen fitters) if you can use a saw I can't imagine breaking one
     
  6. Eighteen12

    Eighteen12 Forager

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    #6 Eighteen12, Dec 6, 2019
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2019
  7. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

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    Nice one, the Accel was my first Silky. I don’t know a single person that has tried one after the Bahco Laplander that hasn't been a convert. The Bahco is like trying to cut with a file by comparison.

    That Ray Mears has a lot to answer for :D
     
  8. Laurentius

    Laurentius Native

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    A good question, I have been thinking about getting one myself recently as I think my folding Wilko wonder saw is a bit long in the tooth, or should I say blunt in the tooth.
     
  9. Snufkin

    Snufkin Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I usually have an F180 in my pack. under £30 and a similar size to a Laplander but cuts like a demon. My only criticism is the lock spring is a bit feeble.
     
  10. Samon

    Samon Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I like the looks of the ultra Accel curve and the big boy. Does anyone have both? Either one particularly better than the other?

    Any is there a best place to order from?

    Cheers so far :)
     
  11. Eighteen12

    Eighteen12 Forager

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    #11 Eighteen12, Dec 6, 2019
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2019
  12. Ruud

    Ruud Full Member

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    I was indeed converted and sold my laplander and its pouch, but then snapped it on the drawcut in very cold weather. Converted back to laplander... if I know I'll be bucking up a lot of wood I'll take a real saw. But that's a whole different conversation... :)
     
  13. forrestdweller

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    i know you wrote "folding saw" but my suggestion would be a fixed blade: i'm using the 270mm version of the "gomtaro" with green screws (which i believe means "medium teeth") -- it has cut cedar in Japan,pruned fruit trees in korea and cut bamboo and tropical timber in central america. I also had a 130mm Pocketboy which i lost a few month ago during an armed robbery :cussing:and didn't manage to replace, yet:cry: (somewhere i read that at some point there have been upgraded to them since I bought mine 5years ago -- anyone know if that's correct?!) i had a nice collection of Silkys when working in Japan but for weight reasons was only able to take 2 with me when I had to leave...
     
  14. TriggerRover

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    Again (sorry) not a folding one. I have a Sugoi, fairly long curved blade. I got it for doing some minor tree work. One of the main points for me was that this particular blade could be sharpened. Some of the others can't.

    I'm not disapointed with it, and as a result use the chain saw less.
     
  15. mikehill

    mikehill Full Member

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    That’s two people saying get a non folder but not saying why. I’m intrigued :biggrin:
     
  16. TriggerRover

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    In response, I didn't 'discount' a folding one, I wanted a fairly heavy duty hand saw, looked what tree surgeon s and the likes were using and went with one I could sharpen.

    Looking at the size of it it'd be a bit of a mammoth folder.... but I do know silky do some mammoth folders also!
     
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  17. Samon

    Samon Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Hmm which ones can be sharpened??
     
  18. TriggerRover

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  19. forrestdweller

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    call it personal preference;), but i find the fixed blade more comfortable for longer use and safer when up on a ladder or in a tree for pruning (==you can use both hands for climbing and need only one hand to reach and "operate" your tool (I "" unlock" my saw before getting up and carry it loosely with the handle on top of the scabbard); my Pocketboy had the advantage of being more compact (and went everywhere with me) which made it better for hiking when i'm not processing thick pieces of large amounts of timber
     
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  20. Stew

    Stew Bushcrafter through and through

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    You can get more blade for your handle. Obv with a folder the handle needs to be as big as the blade to cover it. A blade as long as your forearm is good to get an efficient mechanical action but I wouldn't benefit by having a long handle. If you want compact a folder is handy though.
     
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