1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Website for translating cuts of meat

Discussion in 'Lovely Grub' started by Keith_Beef, Jun 6, 2019.

  1. Keith_Beef

    Keith_Beef Native

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2003
    Messages:
    1,331
    Likes Received:
    233
    Location:
    Yvelines, north-west of Paris, France.
    Robson Valley and Janne like this.
  2. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,782
    Likes Received:
    1,130
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    I need one which can translate across terms in the english language. That's complicated enough.
    Silverside? Topside? (is there a 'bottom side"?) Rump steak?
     
    santaman2000 likes this.
  3. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,679
    Likes Received:
    2,085
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    'Bottom Round Roast' OK with you?

    Sweetbreads, you want the ones from the neck area, or the ones hanging at the back?
    Or the one inside middle of the bovine? Inside further back of a cow? Or close to the ear? Or beside/under the tongue?

    :)
     
  4. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,782
    Likes Received:
    1,130
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    I have not cooked a whole roast 'anything' in 20+ years, bison included.
    Every one of them gets cut up and grilled on stainless steel rods.
    Some bone-in things like a leg of lamb and all sorts of birds but that's it.

    I have 2 beef hearts to stuff, I'll give them an overcoat of bacon strips, really fatty stuff.
    Maybe baste with fat and roll in espresso coffee first.
     
  5. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
    Mod

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2005
    Messages:
    34,858
    Likes Received:
    1,248
    Location:
    S. Lanarkshire
    It's a nice idea, but it doesn't do cuts like gigot chops, or popeseye steak, or even bavette or onglette.
    Maybe it just needs time to build up ?

    M
     
  6. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,782
    Likes Received:
    1,130
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    K-B found something pretty good for major language differences, was a lot of work, I'll bet.

    Maybe the way to start for a single language is to use an Angus Beef cutting chart (Google Images).
    Then, all kinds of equivalent local names get written on the chart beside what's there already.
    Beef words all get used for bison = nearest neighbor kind of thing.
    Local extremes that never make the cook book generalities are left out in the cold.
     
  7. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    15,899
    Likes Received:
    661
    Location:
    Florida
    Ok then. There’s 4 more I have no idea what are?
     
  8. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,782
    Likes Received:
    1,130
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    White-faced range maggots.
     
  9. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,679
    Likes Received:
    2,085
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    Or you can do like they do in Jamaica or other Caribbean countries:
    You take a cleaver, and chop it all up in small pieces. Then cook.
    They do not fuss with cuts. Strangely, it works. but I hate getting bits of crushed bone in my mouth.'

    But, a sizeable % of my income is generated by that! :)

    Every country have some country, even area, specific cuts.

    Anybody of you sliced Beef fillet lengthwise, with the fibers?

    An old southern Moravian or North western Hungarian way.
     
  10. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,782
    Likes Received:
    1,130
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    Nope. Cross cut into skinny strips.
    Fried with a spice mix, garnish with pepper and onion strips = fajita filling.
    5 minute meal.
    I've been using neolithic flint blades to cut the meat. Better than any steel. Amazing.
     
  11. nitrambur

    nitrambur Settler

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2010
    Messages:
    698
    Likes Received:
    41
    Location:
    Nottingham
    I was recently in France visiting my brother, we went out for a meal but they only did pizza and faux-fillet. Me and my mother don't really like melted cheese so we opted for the faux-fillet expecting something burger like, turned out to be sirloin and very nice it was too
     
    santaman2000 and Robson Valley like this.
  12. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
    Mod

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2005
    Messages:
    34,858
    Likes Received:
    1,248
    Location:
    S. Lanarkshire
    Just traditional cuts of meat. The latter two are from French ones though....and gigot is the Scots version of the French cut too.
     
  13. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    15,899
    Likes Received:
    661
    Location:
    Florida
    LOL. You realize I still don’t know what cuts they are?
     
  14. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
    Mod

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2005
    Messages:
    34,858
    Likes Received:
    1,248
    Location:
    S. Lanarkshire
    Okay....a gigot chop is a big slice of the middle of the leg. Usually it's pork, but lamb is popular if an awful lot smaller. Pronounced Jigot, (well really it's jig't..there's a glotal stop in the vernacular :) ) it's a Scottish-French word.
    Himself likes it with the bone out and the meat pan fried, then poached for a wee bit to cook soft. He does not like his meat at all pink, he likes it well cooked. If it looks raw, he'll not eat it. I usually add mushrooms and black pepper to the pan and reduce the jus down since the man doesn't like gravy either.
    My Dad liked his gigot chops fried and served with a fried egg and left over potatoes browned in the same pan.
    Everybody likes it differently. My brother likes his in a roll, with brown sauce.
    https://www.scottbrothersbutchers.co.uk/product/lamb-gigot-chops-9oz-250g-each-pack-of-2/

    Popeseye steak is a quick cook steak, meaty and but quite lean, thin and tender. It's cheaper than sirloin, and rump, but tastier than either. It sits inside the aitch bone of the beast.
    I think I'm just going to find links to butchers and put them in this post, Santaman2000. Probably easier than me trying to describe the actual cut for you. Anyway, popeseye steak is like this
    https://www.mccaskiebutcher.co.uk/popeseye-steak

    Bavette is flank steak. It's long and flat. Cooks easily, it's not an expensive cut, indeed it's sometimes called the Butcher's Cut since it's the one he takes home himself for his dinner, but it's not tough, it's finely marbled and very flavourful. Cook it hot, and quickly, and it'll be just right.
    https://www.buyacow.uk/bavette-steak/

    Onglette/ onglet is another everyday cut of meat. Not expensive treats, just dinner making stuff. It's the 'hanger' steak, from the soft ribs. Sometimes has a sort of tendony line down the middle, but even that's not tough. It's a firmer steak than the bavette. Stronger tasting than the rest.
    https://www.campbellsmeat.com/product/scotch-beef-hanger-steak.html

    Sorry, forgot a link to the gigot chops, added now.
     
    #14 Toddy, Jun 7, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2019
    santaman2000 likes this.
  15. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    15,899
    Likes Received:
    661
    Location:
    Florida
    Thanks. Those beef cuts sound like some we have here, just different names. It seems to popeseye is similar to our round steak (often beaten, floured, and fried here) and the flank steak was once called “buthcher’s steak here as well.

    That gigot sounds great.
     
  16. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
    Mod

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2005
    Messages:
    34,858
    Likes Received:
    1,248
    Location:
    S. Lanarkshire
    I thought round steak was one that took a fair bit of cooking; slowly ?
    Oh well, we live and learn :D
     
  17. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    15,899
    Likes Received:
    661
    Location:
    Florida
    It can be done that way also. The “chicken fried steak” is mainly a Southern thing. Specifically originating in Texas from the German immigrants version of schnitzel.
     
  18. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    15,899
    Likes Received:
    661
    Location:
    Florida
    Seeing that link to the gigot chops is informative. I’ve seen (and bought those here as well. They’re just called lamb steaks her. Very god but quite pricey here. I’ve usually cooked them by sautéing them in oil or butter but occasionally I’ve smoked them.
     
  19. Broch

    Broch Full Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2009
    Messages:
    2,262
    Likes Received:
    1,529
    Location:
    Mid Wales
    OK, the way around this is we choose one reference source (a UK based one of course as we are speaking English) and all agree to adopt those terms forevermore (even the Scots) - I'm sure that will work :)
     
    Janne, santaman2000 and Toddy like this.
  20. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    15,899
    Likes Received:
    661
    Location:
    Florida
    :D I don’t really mind the differing terminology as long as we have a way to translate it.
     

Share This Page