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Trangia recipes

Discussion in 'Lovely Grub' started by Millbilly, Sep 26, 2005.

  1. Millbilly

    Millbilly Guest

    Hiya, did a quick search but didnt find too much. Basically, Im just getting my head around the fact that cooking in the outdoors isnt just about fuel, it can be tastey and exciting too!
    I recentley upgraded from an old hexy burner to a swedish military trangia, and am finding it to be fairly versatile. I know a few other forum members use these as well, so wondered if any one had any tips on cooking with 'em. Im after recipes, recomendations, and advice! Does anyone know of good bits of kit to go with 'em, or foods that work well when cooked in them? Im still in super noodles mode, so any advice would be appreciated... :D
    I found a little green plastic box labelled swedish mess kit in a surplus store the other day, cointaining a large mug, small folding cup, a combination salt/pepper shaker, and a chopping/draining board, all contained in what can be used as two bowls. Im finding it fairly usefull, and have been wondering what other delicacies can be knocked up with this little lot... :confused:
    Any advice would be appreciated!

    Millbilly.
     
  2. Doc

    Doc Need to contact Admin...

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    Not exactly recipes, but my experience with the military trangia to date:

    - It's not great for frying - food can stick. If you do cook sausages/bacon, add a bit of water to start. As this evaporates you move from boil to fry gradually and get less sticking.

    -You can scratch fluid measurement lines every 250ml on the internal surface. Handy when measurements are fairly critical (eg instant mash)

    -it is brilliant when used on the open fire. This is it's great strength, and it is clear from Swedish army training literature that it was intended to be used this way.
     
  3. Millbilly

    Millbilly Guest

    Where can i read some swedish army training literature? And thanks for the frying tip, i was wondering about knocking up some sausages in there...
     
  4. Leeroy

    Leeroy New Member

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    go to

    http://www.trangia.se/

    and click on FOOD AND ADVICE

    there are some alright recipies n there bilberry chocolate is tasty i have tried it myself!
     
  5. Doc

    Doc Need to contact Admin...

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    Somewhere on line is the Swedish Army survival manual - in Swedish, of course- and the pics show the Trangia in use with the open fire. There was a link in a previous thread, or maybe one of our Swedish members could supply it.....?
     
  6. Spacemonkey

    Spacemonkey Native

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    I particularily like those fresh stuffed pasta things you buy in the supermarket in little plastic trays. 3 mins in boiling water see's them done! Then add a sachet of tomato cuppa soup to the remaining water and the sauce is done and none of the excess starch is wasted! They come in a huge range of fillings and only cost about a pound each. Add a tin of mushrooms if you want. I usually take mine out in plastic bags rather than the big trays.
     
  7. Millbilly

    Millbilly Guest

    Come on....... Give us a brand name!!! :D :D :D
     
  8. Spacemonkey

    Spacemonkey Native

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    You talking to me? ;) Sorry, I can't think of any as Im a bit pished. I use Morrisions own and some other more pricy ones they stock. Dunno who makes them though.... Same for soup as i don't normally buy branded food, just whatever's cheapest....
     
  9. anthonyyy

    anthonyyy Settler

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    You cant beat pancakes. I know the frying pan on the army trangia is a bit small but it does the job. You can pre-prepare the batter for day trips.
     
  10. Viking

    Viking Full Member

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    The book you are reffering to is "Armens överlevnadshandbok" is no longer available to download from the internet.

    Bannock is perfect to make wit the drying pan that comes wit the mess kit.
     
  11. Graham_S

    Graham_S Squirrely!

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    my personal favorites at the moment are beanfeast savoury mince mix with a couple of spoonfulls of dried onion, 1 stock cube, 1/2 a teaspoon chilli flakes, and 2" garlic paste. boil up some water, pour into lid of trangia with cous-cous. add the ingredients to main pan with the rest of the water and simmer for 5 mins, then add dumpling mix and simmer for a further 10. (cooking times vary according to the wind, use your own judgment)
    lovely :D by the time the mince and dumplings are ready, so is the cous-cous and having it in the lid of the trangia keeps it hot.
    and good old instant noodles and canned mackrel.
     
  12. Millbilly

    Millbilly Guest


    By drying pan,im assuming you mean the smaller one, the lid? And if so, do i just put the mixture into the cup and cook it over the stove? Ive never made a bannock, but quite fancy giving it a try... :cool:
    Also, for pancakes, do i need oil? Sorry if these are daft questions, but i really want to move away from boil-in-the-bag's! :eek:

    Shame about the book no longer being available. Even though i speak/read no swedish, id've still liked to have taken a look. If anyone fancys posting the pics from the manual, id love to see 'em.

    Millbilly

    Its just dawned on me that drying pan, might actually be a typo fo frying pan... :eek: :eek: :eek:
     
  13. Jared

    Jared Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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  14. lardbloke

    lardbloke Nomad

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    Crikey where do you start with a trangia. You can cook virtually anything in there, you are only limited by your imagination and size. On various forces expeds, I used to stack trangia pots up to three high and have about five five sets on the go at any one time. We used to cook huge curries either using the vile 10 man ration packs or create something nice like corn beef hash. Just fire in instant mash and add corned beef, warm up for a few mins and et voila a lovely filling meal. For the old cook breakfast, just fire in enough butter or oil and fry the bacon first to get fat really going and then fire in the sausages, I usually split them down the middle to make it easier to cook just two sides rather than four. I usually do not fry the eggs because they do stick too much unless I have a non stick pan or go for scrambled egg.
    Pasta and rice is always the main stay for any camper. If you just gently simmer the rice with a lid on (I weigh it down to make it tight fitting, usually the frying pan with a pot of food warming on top) and fire some butter in at the end to make it nice and fluffy. I also usually use chinese veg in thier own sauce (you can get these at Tesco), these can then be heated gently in a pan sitting above.
    For puddings, I usually go for something in a bag that I can warm up in a spare pot that will just about finish me off.
    Experiment in your kitchen before you go. Carry lite and make sure you can cook it easily and you enjoy eating it.
     
  15. Bumblebee

    Bumblebee Nomad

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  16. Viking

    Viking Full Member

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    Yes I mean frying pan =)

    I mix it all at home and put in a plastic bag and then just add water when it´s time to bake and mix it all in the olastic bag. The frying pan can either be sat aside facing the fire or be put over the fire.
     
  17. Viking

    Viking Full Member

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    If you mean SoldfP there is not much in it, mostly security on what you should not do with the burner and so on.

    There will come out a real manual for the mess kit, I started to make on when preapairing a lesson on the mess kit and it´s uses but recently I have not have the time to work on it. But when it´s done I will let you know.
     
  18. twelveboar

    twelveboar Forager

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    One of my favourite ways to have pancakes, is to prepare a dry mix as follows:

    100g/4oz plain flour
    pinch of salt
    1 heaped tablespoon dried egg powder
    Dried milk powder- enough to make up 1/2 a pint (see side of container)

    Make sure the dried ingredients are thoroughly mixed, then add water to make up a pouring batter, and fry in butter or lard. For the full effect serve with honey or maple syrup. Possibly the finest outdoor breakfast in the world? :)
     
  19. scruff

    scruff Settler

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    my fav trangia recipe (altho probably only works with a 25 or 27 series)

    chop up n fry a huge chorizo (i get em from lidl - there really good & excellent for jambalaya) no need for oil as chorizo has big hunks of fat in it which cooks down. chop an onion into that once its got going a little.

    now remove from heat and cook 2 parts water to 1 part rice in the other pan with a veg stock cube a teaspoon of ginger powder and a teaspoon of dried chilli flakes. put the lid/ frying pan on top and allow to cook slowly, using the simmer ring/ snuffer thingy to regulate a gentle heat. stand the chorizo n onion on top of the lid and they will keep cooking! (u can add a small tin of chopped tomatoes to the chorizo here)

    i love using this double cooking method, using the lid/ friying pan as a hot plate. it gives u twice the surface area for cooking. u can also boil the kettle on the lid/ frying pan too!!

    i'm feeling quite hungry now

    :(
     
  20. NickBristol

    NickBristol New Member

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    Stop talking about food just before lunch - my stomach's gone off on one now :D

    Nasi goreng is gorgeous cooked in a trangia or swedish army kit. Quick tip first - dont waste fuel boiling water for rice: in a half litre nalgene or similar bottle, two-thirds fill with rice, then top up with water. Screw the lid on, stuff in in your sack and go off for the day. Come dinner time, the water will be absorbed and you can just fry the rice in next to no time :)

    This is best for a slightly more equipped trip with mates than a quick minimal kit bushcraft foray but well worth the extra weight for a few hours till it's all cooked and drunk :D

    Nasi Goreng
    Ingredients(serves four)

    4 cups rice, cooked
    6 eggs
    4 tbsp oil
    2 medium onions, diced
    1 garlic clove, diced
    half cup pork, minced
    half cup of shrimps, cooked and peeled
    2 tbsp soy sauce
    2 chillies, thinly sliced
    half cup ham, thinly sliced
    quarter cup of celery, chopped
    half cup dried onion flakes

    Preparation

    1. Cut the ham into 1 inch long by eighth of an inch wide strips . Beat the eggs. Heat the trangia lid and grease it with a few drops of oil. Make 4 thin omelettes from 4 of the eggs, slice, and set aside to use as a garnish. Add 2 tbsp of oil to the skillet and make a thicker omelette from the other 2 eggs, and slice into half inch squares, and put to one side.

    2. Add a tbsp of oil and fry the diced onions and garlic for 2 minutes. Add the pork and stir until the pork is cooked. Add the shrimps, omelette squares, soy sauce, rice and salt and pepper to taste, then mix together over a low heat (remember to use the simmer ring!) for 10 minutes. Heat 1 tbsp of oil over a medium heat in a frying pan and add the onion flakes and stir until they are brown and crisp.

    3. Garnish with the sliced omelette, chillies, ham, celery and onion flakes.

    4. Finish with an egg banjo.

    5. Wash down with 1 or 3 ice cold lagers.
     

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