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Tips & tricks for drying apple rings

Discussion in 'The Homestead' started by British Red, Sep 27, 2019.

  1. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I know a lot of us run a dehydrator here. Since we planted our orchard, we dry a LOT of apples (600 to 800 a year). Doing that number means that we try to make the process as efficient as possible. In this weeks video we share a couple of those techniques :)


     
  2. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    Great video. I'd forgotten I have one of those peeler /corer gadgets somewhere must dig it out . Still have some apple crisps I made 2 yrs ago by drying them. Yummy snack.
     
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  3. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Brilliant vid.

    Personally I like to have the peel/skin left on the dried slices.
    Good for the internal works!
     
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  4. Le Loup

    Le Loup Nomad

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    We use our wood fired stove to dry fruit & vegies.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Keith.
     
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  5. JohnC

    JohnC Full Member

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    We use one of the peeler/corers, very glad we got it! I’ll try the citric acid rinse next batch.. great video
     
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  6. baggins

    baggins Full Member

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    Another great vid Red. Stocking up this weekend from the folks orchard. Like the tip on citric acid.
     
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  7. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Citric acid is the active ingredient in many "eco" cleaners, used in wine making, superb for derusting, excellent in Acid drops and Tangfastics. Its amazingly useful
     
  8. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    We do in Winter, but its just too hot at this time of year!
     
  9. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Mother used Lemon juice for dipping / immersing the fruit ( apple, pear) she dried. Then she made lemonade from the remains. We drank lemonade for several days after each drying session.

    Citric Acid = Vitamin C
     
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  10. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Yup, lemon juice works fine, its just that citric acid powder is much cheaper!
     
  11. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Yes it is.

    Ever tried the US made dried apple slices?
    A perversion.
     
  12. SimonL

    SimonL Full Member

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    I wonder if I might politely inquire (please forgive my ignorance) about the process of "dehumidifying" ?
    If I wanted to try this with some apple rings, would simply putting them on a tray at a low heat in an oven work ?
    Thanks
    Simon
     
  13. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    That is what mother did. Leave door open about one centimetre for the released humidity to escape.

    Whole small fruits, sliced apples, pears, funghi, bread squares for later butter frying for croutons, bread for crushing into bread crumbs, home made pasta.finely sliced garlic, finely cubed onion, leeks, plus various herbs.

    The trick is to keep a low temperature.
     
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  14. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Yes. So will simply putting them on a single layer on a tray and placing them in a freezer for a couple of days. They’ll dry as the moisture is lost to sublimation without any cooking at all.
     
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  15. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Dehydrating needs a low heat. About 60C for fruit. Some ovens will go that low but if not, use the lowest setting with the door propped open. Threading the rings on a stick or piece of metal (coat hanger?) Helps them to dry evenly
     
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  16. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    I can get 60C or so in my oven with 250F and the door cracked open an inch.
    Chemical cure and seasonings, burger jerky takes an afternoon to make.
    58C in the dehydrator, Roma tomato halves take overnight in the dehydrator.
    I'll guess that 1/2" apple slices would be about like the tomatoes for time.
    Usually at bedtime, I rotate the stack of drying trays.
    I don't know if that really helps at all but I pretend it's important.

    Pacific Northwest First Nations thread clams/mussels/oysters on cords to hang over very smoky fires.
    Maybe 6' up, has to be 60C or less for a few days.
    Living in huge wooden houses, there was always a useful fire for this.

    There's some evidence still that our native crab apple (Malus pacifica) was dried to be rehydrated as a treat.
     
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