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The best hot chocolate...in the world?

Discussion in 'The Homestead' started by British Red, Nov 1, 2019.

  1. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    This one is not really very bushcrafty, or very self sufficient either, but it is home made, traditional and a firm family favourite!

     
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  2. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Will watch the vid tonight, as all your videos they need time, and a ice beverage on the side...

    You should try my cocoa drink ( cocoa drink? Chocolate? Do not know the difference), you would love it!
    It is an Adult drink.
     
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  3. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Put a recipe up! This one is fairly adult too!
     
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  4. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I’m also saving this one to watch later tonight. We’ve finally gotten a decent cold snap and it’s time for some good hot chocolate.
     
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  5. Dave Budd

    Dave Budd Gold Trader
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    odd coincidental timing here, I just sat down with a hot chocolate!

    Actually, it's hot chocolate wine, based on an 18th century recipe that a friend of mine has in one of his cook books. The recipe calls for fortified wine (sherry, port or sask) since french wine was often tricky to get hold of at the time, sugar and chocolate. I didn't have any port, so have done mine with straight red wine and some extra sugar. It's bloody marvellous! :D
     
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  6. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    Mmmm! I do this though I've never put vanilla extract into the cream. I'll be rectifying this next time I make it. Gotta have the home made cherry brandy though a glug or two of normal good quality brandy is almost as good.
    My daughter loves it made with chilli chocolate and brandy but I don't!
     
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  7. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    British Red, watch your videos is like watching my mother when I was young!

    Nice to see that somebody keeps the old skills alive.
     
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  8. John Fenna

    John Fenna Lifetime Member & Maker

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    The most amazing "Hot Chocolate" I ever had was on a "Beaver Club" (it is about canoeing OK!) meet.
    Put Choc powder in mug.
    Add enough hot water to make said choc into a thin paste
    Add Captain Morgan's finest to the rim of the mug.
    Serve!
     
  9. Le Loup

    Le Loup Nomad

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    I thought some of you may find this of some interest.
    Keith.

    18th Century Chocolate Part 2.


    "Scrape four ounces of chocolate and pour a quart of boiling water upon it; mix it well and sweeten it to your taste; give it a boil and let it stand all night; then mix it again very well; boil it in two minutes, then mix it till it will leave the froth upon the tops of your cups."
    1769 in The Experienced English Housekeeper:

    French & Indians 1745 carrying chocolate.
    http://books.google.com.au/books?id...th century military chocolate rations&f=false


    Benjamin Franklin secured six pounds of chocolate per officer as a special supply for soldiers marching with General Braddock’s army at the onset of the French & Indian War. Connecticut soldier Daniel Sizer supplemented his meager diet on the northern New York frontier with rations of chocolate in 1759. Chocolate was supplied to the British troops during construction of His Majesty’s Fort at Crown Point, New York, in 1768. During the American Revolution, commissaries accounted for a steady supply of chocolate at such northern defenses as Fort Ticonderoga, where Captain Moses Greenleaf regularly “breakfasted on chocolate”. In 1777 it was forbidden to export chocolate from Massachusetts, as it was required “for the supply of the army”.

    http://americanheritagechocolate.com/html/history/choco_colonilal_army.htm

    And for your health:

    Milk chocolate, or milk coffee, which is not made too strong of the coffee, or too thick with chocolate, may be taken in common, as breakfast or supper; milk porridge, leek porridge, etc. are very proper. Dry toasted bread, with honey, or some preserve, or marmalade of fruit, etc. may be eaten with the tea, chocolate, etc. where tea, or any of the above things do not agree, some of the aromatic herbs may be used as such.

    Thomas Hayes, 1796. A Serious Address on the Dangerous Consequences of Neglecting Common Colds.

    http://americanheritagechocolate.com/html/history/choco_health.htm

    ”Mr. Hill, Mr. Lucas, & I went to Mr. Burland’s to see his and his wife’s Pictures, & Breakfasted on Chocolate.”
    Dr. C Morris 21 Feb 1721.

    http://18thcenturydiary.org.uk/chocolate-and-tea/
    I was amazed at how difficult it was to research chocolate. Though several companies claim to be using period wrapping, there is no documentation to back this up. Linen paper was available and this seems to be the most likely choice, but people would have wrapped their own to suit their purpose.

    As to what chocolate looked like when produced for sale, the most likely shape is in bar form, but this too was hard to research. Chocolate was available in the 17th century:

    In Bishopsgate St is an excellent West India drink called chocolate to be sold, where you may have it ready at any time, and also unmade at reasonable rates.
    Public Advertiser 1657.



    ”One penny was spent on chocolata”
    The account book of Sarah Fell of Swarthmoor hall.
    November 1675.
    "April 24, 1661 - Waked in the morning with my head in a sad taking through the last night’s drink, which I am very sorry for; so rose and went with Mr Creede to drink our morning draught, which he did give me in jocolatte to settle my stomach"
    "November 24, 1664. About noon out with Commissioner Pett, and he and I to a Coffee-house, to drink jocolatte, very good; and so by coach to Westminster, being the first day of the Parliament's meeting."
    Samuel Pepys Diary.
    [​IMG]
    Early 18th century Valencia Spain.

    [​IMG]
    Here you can see the bars of chocolate ready for melting.
    http://users.telenet.be/worldstandards/chocolate - history.html

    [​IMG]
    Luis Melendez 1715-1780. Here it appears that the chocolate has been made in biscuit form, and looks as though it was wrapped in linen paper.

    As this chocolate was supplied in a solid form, there is nothing to say that the chocolate was not eaten as a food as well as being used for a drink. It would indeed make a reasonable trail food, though in its original form without added nutmeg, cinnamon, sugar or honey it would no doubt have tasted a little bitter.

    I suggest that if you intend to produce your own chocolate sticks from melted dark chocolate, that you simply wrap it is paper and then place it in a linen or cotton bag.
    Taken from my blog at: https://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/2012/02/18th-century-chocolate-part-2.html
     
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  10. MartinK9

    MartinK9 Full Member

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    When I imbibed, a handful of chocolate covered raisins in a shot or two of rum..... Adult "Old Jamaica"
     
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  11. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    Old Jamaica chocolate bars.. now there's a blast from the past!
    I have made some delicious hazelnut liqueur and I'm thinking a shot of that would go well. Nutella flavour. :)
     
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  12. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Could I by any chance trouble you for the full recipe please Dave? That sounds right up my alley!
     
  13. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Chilli is lovely, but not in hot chocolate!
     
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  14. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Thank you do much, that means a lot!
     
  15. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Or Cointreau for chocolate orange!
     
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  16. Paul_B

    Paul_B Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Anyone like chilli with their hot chocolate? Obviously the old fashioned way of taking it that's come back into favour like it's a newly invented concoction.
     
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  17. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    My way:
    For one large cup:
    One small espresso ( or very strong brewed coffee, about two soup spoons)
    Varlhona cocoa ( Van Houten or Droste are excellent too)
    Water
    Full fat milk
    Whipping cream/double cream
    Brown sugar
    Tiny pinch of salt
    1 drop Vanilla extract ( I use Bourbon Vanilla extract)

    Adult Content:
    Ron Zacapa 23


    Warm up about 50 ml water gently, stir in slowly about 2 soup spoons of the cacao powder.
    Stir smooth, heat up almost up to a boil.
    Take off heat, stand for 10-15 minutes.
    Back on heat, heat up, pour in about 200 ml of milk.
    Heat up.
    Pour in 50 ml of cream, heat up.
    Drop of Vanilla essence, sugar to taste.
    A tiny pinch of salt
    Espresso,
    Heat up, stirring well
    Pour a measure of Rum in a large cup, fill with cocoa drink.

    To be honest, I never measure exactly, the only more or less fixed volume is the Espresso shot.
    In the evening I use a smaller shot, day time a larger one.

    I do not have any whipped cream on top. Trying not to get too fat!

    To be honest 2: if you use a quality cocoa, the result will be nice!

    No matter what you do!

    The way I do it, not many children like it, as it is very full of taste, slightly bitter and not so sweet.

    The Rum adds a nice flavour!
     
    #17 Janne, Nov 1, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2019
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  18. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I like chilli in a bar, did try it in the liquid form, but it added an unwanted ( my taste) flavour.

    Black Pepper is interesting too.

    Off topic, but marinating strawberries with Black Pepper and Vodka plus sugar is nice.


    Originally, my parents used the Austrian Stroh Rum in my recipe.

    I tried Malt, Brandy, all sorts, but found dark Rum to be tastiest.
    Then discovered Zacapa....

    The salt increases the flavours too.

    But, like with all food, we all prefer different stuff!
     
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  19. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Spanish conquistadors reported that "chocolatl" was mixed with corn flour for the fat and crushed chilis were added
    before the hot water. The Spanish changed the name to "chocolate". They abandoned the corn flour and chili
    for sugar and vanilla (smart move, I say).

    Thus, something nice like Mexican Barro chocolate (laced with sugr and cinnamon) makes a very civilized drink.

    The stimulant alkaloid "Theobromine" contains no bromine. But, it is just a single carbon atom away from being caffeine!
     
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  20. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Oddly that’s the way the Mayans liked it: chocolate powder boiled in water with a dash of crushed chili peppers. I still occasionally add a touch of cayenne pepper to mine.
     
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