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Skills and how they learned

Discussion in 'Bushcraft Chatter' started by Bee Outdoors, Aug 11, 2019.

?

do you adapt skills to suit your needs of follow them exactly how you were taught?

  1. Adapt the skill

    8 vote(s)
    88.9%
  2. Exactly how it’s taught

    1 vote(s)
    11.1%
  1. Bee Outdoors

    Bee Outdoors Member

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    May you call it Bushcraft or wilderness survival skills, it really does not matter.

    I tend to apply any skill the way it works for me. There are proven methods of doing things and one should not disregard them but always question them in order to adapt them for yourself.

    I try not to play along with a trend in order to belong, I adapt the knowledge to improve my skills and better the person I am. even though we are trying to achieve the same outcome applying skills is a funny thing, what works for one might not work for another.

    I don’t set out to reinvent a tried and tested method, I try to improve that method so it works the way I want it to.

    No skill stays the same, with time it is taught and learned slightly different, so when you learning a new skill pay attention to the principals of what is taught and adapt it for yourself. Question what you learn not the skill of the person you learn from.

    Every man and woman is unique and their ways are different but we all strive to be better and apply skills to make our lives easier and more adaptable.
     
  2. Erbswurst

    Erbswurst Native

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    In that business exists a WRONG and a RIGHT WAY how to do the things.

    The stuff changed a bit but that didn't really change the way how to do it properly.
     
  3. Bee Outdoors

    Bee Outdoors Member

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  4. Bee Outdoors

    Bee Outdoors Member

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    Give me a few examples please, I’m interested in peoples opinions
     
  5. snappingturtle

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    I think its what I call foundation and adaption one is as it comes to you (foundation) I think most get that up to a working level then adaption comes in, you will always end up doing it in a way another has because all option will have been tried, some things will always work one way, due to there only really being a single option or effective method but that is also about what your doing, if I'm working on a car, gun, making a knife only so many things will work if I'm out climbing well that's mostly more open. but in the main adaption is most likely the out come with any passed skill.
     
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  6. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Very difficult question.
    The correct way varies according to circumstances like surrounding, climate, distance to civilization and so on.
    Also, own experience counts.

    Personally, having done the majority of my time in nature a long way from civilization (and help) I have always chosen the most safe way and method.
     
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  7. Erbswurst

    Erbswurst Native

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    Tonight I slept on a camping ground at Bergerac, not far away from Bordeaux.

    I used a piramide tent (Luxe outdoor SilHexpeak V4a) without attached inner tent or ground sheed, just the outer tent, and put a military poncho under me.

    I choosed a place that was round about 5 cm higher than the ground around.

    During the night we got really heavy rain, totally unexpected for the most other campers.

    The water entered all the tents around me. Everybody got a wet sleeping bag. The modern tent constructions didn't help them anything.

    My equipment stood dry of course, because I know how to choose the place to put a tent.

    That's the difference between right and wrong way to do it.

    The same is the packing list.
    Most people carry far to much stuff around, the rucksacks filled up with "ultralight" equipment are bulky and really heavy. I carry usually 34 litres of equipment and food. Without water, food, fuel and soap that's round about 6 kg. That's the right way to do it. A rucksack of more than 13 kg for a summer hike is simply the wrong way to do it.

    Or let's look at the knife:
    A light fix blade knife with blade up to 10 or maximal 12 cm is the right choice for trekking and bushcraft. Even an ultra light Opinel No8 folding knife or Victirinox Compact or Climber can do the job.
    To carry something larger around simply is the wrong way, because it isn't handy and to heavy.

    Spare clothing to change once if you wash your main clothing are the right way, if needed with additional warm layers.
    2x spare clothing is usually a beginners fault if you go for hiking, independed how long you travel.

    And so on and so on, and so on....
     
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  8. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    You are correct, unless you want to do a version of ‘ bushcrafting’ similar to what many forumers here do, transporting a huge amount of equipment using various wheeled aids ( car, wheelbarrow, etc) a very short distance.

    If you are walking distances, you learn very quickly what you need.
    It is advisable to carry some spare/replacement equipment if you do spend time away from civilization.
    Matches (storm) or a lighter, a blade, sugar & fat ( chocolate).
    Black bin bag.

    15 to 20 kilos is what is adequate for several weeks, and that is including food.
     
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  9. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Carry what's important for your environment. Every biogeoclimatic zone on earth is different.
    My list for the Boreal Forest in the interior of British Columbia is not the list that 'd carry on the coast.
    That, you figure out from your more experienced companions. Lots of short trips to shake down the list.
    Those are really the fun trips, trying to make do with all the wrong crap that you dragged along.

    I need 75' of 1/8" s/s aircraft cable to sling my food bag up in a tree 100m from my camp. You don't.
    Nobody you want to meet lives where I go to play in the mountain forests.
     
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  10. Erbswurst

    Erbswurst Native

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    Yes, of course you can put a lot of food on top of the 6 to 7 kg base weight if you really go in real wilderness.
    Or you put a winter sleeping bag on top , a thick fleece jacket and other winter equipment.

    But usually I see people running around in the high summer in civilised areas carrying rucksacks around which I would use for a longer independent winter trip.

    Camping in the woods is Camping in the woods. If it's right or wrong to do it out of a Landrover or Unimog I don't want to judge. But It's definitely something else than survival training, hiking and bushcraft in the real sense of the meaning.
     
  11. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    It is very difficult to put a name on the various sorts of ‘bushcrafting’.

    I personally dislike the term. I do not and have never ‘crafted’ anything.
    Choose a dry, safe place to sleep. Fish. Clean fish. Make a small enough fire to cook the food on and boil coffee.
    Go to the toilet.
    Enjoy listening and watching the animal life.

    2 weeks of this and I can work against the clock without failures 40 hours per week again.

    The initial poster placed the words ‘how they are learned’.
    I think the best is from a parent ( dad usually) or a relative that has done this stuff. Or somebody older with real life experience.
    Internet ( youtoobe) is full of BS lethal advice.
     
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  12. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    I'm trying to think back to learning camp crafts.
    Major source had to be parents on camping trips or in some circumstance that fit (cooking fish in clay).
    I think us kids got a whole lot more than other kids did as we camped for 2+ weeks every summer.

    I did go to one or more scout (?) camps of 7-10 days.
    I recall we walked a mile and struck a camp (hidden piles of food to cook).
    The main purpose of that jaunt was to learn a whole bunch of different fire lays.

    The kinds of essential base-camp things that fit into every hunting and fishing trip for decades.
     
  13. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I have hiked in and enjoyed it. That said, it’s never been either my preferred method nor my definition of “bushcraft.” I prefer canoeing in as well as Jeep expeditions (sadly I believe they no longer do the Camel Stakes) One I day hope to be able to afford a horseback/pack animal expedition into real wilderness (as I age that prospect gets farther and farther away)
     
  14. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    The "Guides & Outfitters Association of British Columbia" have members who run "camping" pack trains for 7-10 days.
    Bit late in the summer, they will be gearing up for the lottery/Limited Entry big game seasons now.
    That's always an exciting time, especially when clients shoot well.
     
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  15. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I wish it were possible. As I said cost is a consideration and my health isn’t likely to hold out u til I can afford it. My current forecast is similar to what Wayland posted on his thread: a future of family camping at easy sites and memories of younger days. No regrets though.
     
  16. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    I'm waiting, maybe tomorrow, for amputation surgery.
    Bad circulation as a diabetic complication...
    I sleep at home now. Wilderness is 15-30 minutes away.

    Google Kettle River Guides. I'm on the Home Page with the turkey.
    Click on the cougar to see how big those cats can get with a steady deer diet.
     
  17. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Good luck, I hope all goes well!
     
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  18. snappingturtle

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    There is that other skill set not much thought of "pioneering" methods which just come about by working it out for yourself, I have a fair few that came about by just trying, the odd thing about this is finding things that work independent of input from others, only to find you came to the same method as others anyhow.

    Ps, Best of fortune Rob!
     
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  19. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Prayers for your surgery.
     
  20. Wayland

    Wayland Hárbarðr

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    Good luck, I will be thinking of you.
     
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