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Sausage in lard

Discussion in 'Lovely Grub' started by rik_uk3, Feb 2, 2009.

  1. rik_uk3

    rik_uk3 Banned

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    B&M stores are selling tins of Pork sausages in lard at 39p a tin, similar to the old compo sausages for those of an age to remember them:)
     
  2. durulz

    durulz Need to contact Admin...

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    Sausages in lard! Bloody hell.
    And as if that wasn't bad enough...39p!? You've got to wonder about the quality...
     
  3. MartinK9

    MartinK9 Full Member

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    Ahhhhhhhhh memories... They don't stock Cheese Possessed as well do they?:D
     
  4. andy_pevy

    andy_pevy Tenderfoot

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    Sorry, but I do not recognize the store B&M, could you enlighten me please ?.

    Andy
     
  5. robin wood

    robin wood Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Never mind B&M do you know what MRM stands for? you'll find it on the ingredients list, shortly after water.:)
     
  6. Tadpole

    Tadpole Full Member

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    Mechanically recovered meat. Take the bones that all meat producers throw away, and then jet wash them with high-pressure hoses. And there you have it, Mechanically recovered meat. Food has the ingredients listed in order by quantity, so if water is listed first then the food has a heck of a lot of water.:eek:
     
  7. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    Actually that shopping chain stocks an awful lot of good quality brand names.
    My gluten free bread last cost me £2.39 for a small loaf, and they sell it for 29p !!:eek:

    Sacla antipasta jars normally £2.49 were 39p, and Campbell's concentrated soups were 19p last week, and they were all well within their dates too :cool:

    cheers,
    Toddy
     
  8. xylaria

    xylaria Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    And they stocked puffed svelt for 50p a bag before christmas (tescos price £1.50). They do some right manky stuff too. they do cheese substitue as well. I have been really poor in past, but even I would eat TVP before eating sausages in lard.

    My Ox heart jerky turned out really tasty. I bet that beats those sausages for pence per protien gram hands down.
     
  9. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    I wondered how that would work out :cool:
    I think we greatly undervalue using the whole animal these days. Black puddings, sausages, haggis, hearts, kidneys and liver are all good food if folks eat meat.

    Cheese substitute ? I'm not allowed dairy these days..........and cheezley costs a fortune.......what kind of cheese substitute ? I didn't see that. I did get Rowse's organic honey for 59p though :)

    cheers,
    Toddy
     
  10. inthewids

    inthewids Nomad

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    Is it the bright orange waxy stuff? I would eat the whole animal but not hot dogs or cheapo sausages full of uber muck.
     
  11. African

    African Member

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    I worked on a farm in South Africa in my younger day years ago and when an ox was slaughtered the highlight after the job was stuffed and roasted ox heart. Sadly I was too young and stupid to find out how it was done but can remember it was a seasoned bread type stuffing and was roasted as you would a chicken or leg o lamb and was bloody delicious!!! Second best for me was cold boiled tongue and mustard sarnies on home baked bread!!! The memory is all the sweeter knowing that 'elth 'n safty would have had a blue hairy fit if they had been there!!! :D
     
  12. rik_uk3

    rik_uk3 Banned

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    Ahhhh food of the gods:)

    Meat is meat, if you are prepared to eat the 'fine' cuts, don't be squeamish about the rest of the animal that died to feed you:rolleyes:

    The sausages are not bad, a bit like hot dogs without the smoked flavour plus you get some good lard to fry your mushrooms, eggs, black pudding and bread in:)

    My willpower failed today though and I bought 4X2.6kg tins of Cross & Blackwell Spaghetti hoops at 39p a tin
     
  13. robin wood

    robin wood Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I am not in the least squeamish about eating the less popular cuts but personally i would rather buy bones from a butcher I know and boil them up for stock, I enjoy offal etc. I also enjoy (if I want cheap protein) the cheap and unfashionable fish particularly oily fish like herring, sardine and mackerel.

    MRM is a whole different kettle of fish. It is the worst bits of the worst industrial animal keeping. As I said I am not squeamish about an animal dying and eating it but I do care about the excesses of industrial "farming". Do a quick search on google and you will find loads of horror stories particularly from around BSE time of contaminated spinal tissue getting into MRM. Manufacturers having no records of how much of it went into their cheap meat products etc. It is not "meat" it is washed out connective tissue, tasteless padding, a vehicle for artificial flavors.

    In the US hot dog sausages are not allowed more than 20% MRM, typical UK hot dog sausages have no "meat" other than MRM. Aldi do German Brockwurst which do not have MRM, we buy them for the kids to cook over camp fires. I can not afford to eat free range organic meat every day so I eat a lot of beans and I really enjoy a good bit of meat when I have it.
     
  14. trail2

    trail2 New Member

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    Toddy.
    Do you haveCD?. One of my sons has it and makes gluten free camping a bit of a problem.
    Compo sausages!! right up there along with the Mutton and Peas main meal :eek:
    Jon R.
     
  15. rik_uk3

    rik_uk3 Banned

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    To be quite honest Robin, I really don't care about MRM, the odds of it killing me are maybe a billion to one, and I'll eat it if its there. The only meat product pretty much that I won't buy is Tongue, not because of what it is but I just don't like the taste unless I buy a whole Ox tongue and cook it myself

    This may not be a popular view, but I'll buy two chickens for a fiver and not loose a minutes sleep over it, same with pork, lamb any meat for that matter and truth be known so do so most members here (they may feel guilty when eating it but will still buy it and not openly admit it) and I won't indulge in the luxury of organic brainwashing (I do like well hung beef and will pay whatever is costs for a prime Chine joint or Ox tails).

    So, sausage in lard, sure, great for the prep cupboard and a good source of fat for frying when camping:):D
     
  16. Bodge

    Bodge Full Member

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    I will have to second you on this Robin. After years in the trade mrm is never on my menu.
    It's just a profit bulker for the producers who dont give a fig for anyones' well being.
    I have seen some of these machines in action, not just water washers but presses too which pulp skin and bone which all ends up in the final gue. Mrm should be banned imo but there is obviously a market for it.:(
     
  17. rik_uk3

    rik_uk3 Banned

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    When a kid and a manager for Tesco, I went on a trip to the Bernard Mathews factory, new machine to show us, pulped up everything, but tasted pretty good at the end of it

    Considering all the green/organic give a dam eaters here there seems to be a massive amount of supermarket meat wrappers, value meat wrappers, value veg wrappers, value bacon wrappers, value egg boxes etc in the rubbish at the end of most weekends camps I've been on (and not all the rubbish from me), I wonder who plants that there? must be the bloomin pixies again :lmao: :lmao: :lmao:

    I don't go looking for MRM but I won't loose sleep over finding it in my camping food
     
  18. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    :35: :35: :35:

    I can hardly be accused of being a bleeding heart liberal - happy to kill, skin, gut and cook most things with fur, feather or scales.

    But, having been a country dweler all my life, the cruelty of industrialised farming turns my stomach. Its un-neccesary and all about lining the pockets of the greedy and lazy.

    In addition I don't want my food pumped full of growth hormones, antibiotics, colouring and God alone knows what else....and that before its dead!

    If I had to eat that rubbish I'd go vegetarian

    Red
     
  19. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    It appears that I am gluten and dairy intolerant, the result is a massive response from my immune system that triggers the rheumatoid arthritis flare ups.
    Much though I love oatcakes, good bread and cheese......I *really, really * miss cheese.......it's just not worth the pain :sigh:

    The camping is actually not bad. Gluten free pasta just tastes the same as do rice and rice noodles. There are always spuds, carrots, onions, parsnips, greens, courgettes, cauliflower, broccoli, peppers, mushrooms and beets to fill out dinner. Beans and peas, lentils and corn are fine.

    Just no wheat, oats, barley or rye.

    Bread substitutes are frankly awful, but I've kind of developed good batter mixes. (got teased at the Moot, new Scots delicacy, haggis and deep fried battered pineapple :D )

    Indian, traditional African and south American foods are very useful, they weren't ever so wheat relliant the way our food is.They still use a vast array of interesting seeds for different flours. Idli is pretty handy stuff, it makes a bread that can be either sweet or savoury and it steams nicely inside two pot lids above a pot of simmering water.

    The really annoying bit is how the gluten and dairy products are included in so many foods. e.g. Soy sauce is nowadays made from wheat rather than soya since it ferments more quickly, for instance :( and it doesn't need any more than a trace to set things off.

    Your son has my sympathy, but it is do-able, especially if other folks don't mind eating gluten free stuff at times too.
    I find I do make a lot of stuff from scratch though. Prepackaged food just don't suit.
    I can't buy gluten and dairy free vegan sausages for instance, so if I want them, it's make my own.

    It's actually been quite an interesting exercise in sussing out a whole new type of cooking, I do miss the ease and comfort of our own food though :( I made a clootie dumpling to take to the last meet up, and the smell as it cooked was mouthwateringly good, and I just couldn't eat it :(
    I have developed a gluten and dairy free one though :D It's not bad, even if I do say so myself :D
    I made scones for my son's breakfast this morning, and, y'know a couple of them with home made blackcurrant jam and a cup of coffee would have been sooooo good :rolleyes:
    Not worth the pain.

    atb,
    M
     
  20. trail2

    trail2 New Member

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    Sounds like Celiac Disease. We all went GF in the house. No more store bought pizzas or doughnuts :( I have actually grown used to the bread. There are a lot of good mixes now that you can use.Especially in a bread machine.
    Camping involves a lot of rice noodles, pasta and meat and veggies.
    Good think he likes venison jerky as that is his snack of choice.
    There are a few cheese products out there but they are better for cooking with than sans.
    Even found dairy free ice cream but that only goes along on car camping trips.
    A lot of the quick Indian and Thai foods are GF so that helps as he really likes them.
    Heck you can even get gluten free beer now.( not at all bad)
    Stick with it. I know where you are coming from.
    Jon R.
     

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