1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Salting Pork

Discussion in 'The Homestead' started by santaman2000, Apr 19, 2019.

  1. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    15,816
    Likes Received:
    631
    Location:
    Florida
    You don’t really “pick” cranberries (they are floating on the water when they’re harvested) You have to wade out to gather them if you aren’t doing it commercially.

    The old fashioned way on small farms


    The modern way on commercial large farms
     
    #101 santaman2000, Jun 5, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2019
  2. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,372
    Likes Received:
    1,997
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    They grow on marshes. Same everywhere. They flood the ’fields’ to make harvesting easier.
    Saw it on tv. How Its Made maybe?

    We used to pick cloudberries on those marshes, and also picked the odd Cranberry to make the Cloudberry jam ’last longer’, get more acidity and a nicer, reddish colour.
    I hated picking the goddamn things.
    Today we still pick Cloudberries, we have a secret place in Norway. But no Cranberries there.
    Arctic Bramble and Crowberries yes. But you will not know what those are.
     
  3. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    15,816
    Likes Received:
    631
    Location:
    Florida
    Sorry Janne. I was editing while you were replying.
     
  4. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,648
    Likes Received:
    1,081
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    We have lingonberry and many varieties of blue berries, knee deep as far as you can see in the forest understory.
    The very best fed wild Ruffed grouse on the planet. Strawberries, raspberries, Saskatoons, pin cherries, choke cherries.
    Cranberries and elderberries, too. In season, go pick what you want for free, they all grow all over our landscape.
    Hazel nuts down along the rivers. Hawthorn and Sorbus if you are really hard up.

    What may become a far bigger and more serious issue will be the increasing populations of wild/feral pigs.
    Then, I'm going to be bringing home the bacon. I'll require a semi permanent smoker house in the back yard.
    Gifts to the neighbors will keep everyone fed and happy.
     
  5. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,648
    Likes Received:
    1,081
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    The commercial cranberry of the Pacific Northwest is quite different from the wild species found along forest edges.
     
  6. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,372
    Likes Received:
    1,997
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    No worries, superb vid!

    I guess your wild one is very similar to ours.
    The domesticated one we can buy fresh in plastic bags, or by the pound, loose, before Christmas.

    I make my own sauce, goes well with roast pork. The canned one is ultra sweet.
     
    santaman2000 likes this.
  7. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,372
    Likes Received:
    1,997
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    Those pigs must be tasty. Use your 308W with an IR scope and silencer from your house.
    A friend in Sweden does it. From his kitchen window.
    He smokes them.
     
  8. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    15,816
    Likes Received:
    631
    Location:
    Florida
    The feral hogs are edible, but that’s the best tjat can be said for them. Remember the earlier conversations about uncastrated male critters? The sows aren’t really much better. Very strong tasting.
     
    Robson Valley likes this.
  9. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,648
    Likes Received:
    1,081
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    Lots of hand-wringing and fearful predictions, knowing the damage they do in the US and in Australia.
    I have not heard of any local sightings at all. I expect 50 guys to be out, the first chance we get!
    Then, we will have a piggy prep class or two with recipes.
     
  10. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    15,816
    Likes Received:
    631
    Location:
    Florida
    Good luck. Once they get a foothold you can’t really control them; much less eliminate them.
     
  11. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,372
    Likes Received:
    1,997
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    We do not have feral hogs in Europe, but the wild boar.
    Same problems with them though. Destroy everything.

    Adult males uneatable, old females the same.
    Young females and very young males delicious though!

    Best marinated in red wine with garlic and herbs, then slow roasted in a closed pan. High humidity.
    Cream and herb sauce. Lingon berry or even better, Rovan berry jelly.
     
  12. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,372
    Likes Received:
    1,997
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    You guys should explore your African heritage, like I do.
    Salt Porktail Soup, the way done in Jamaica.
    Just had a bowl.

    Then you should not forget your Central European Heritage, and try Headcheese, home made, from pork head.
    Delish( ous) with a couple of slices of home baked, Horseradish and Apple mix. Sweet mustard.

    As the Wise Women of old said, only the squeal should remain!
     
  13. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    15,816
    Likes Received:
    631
    Location:
    Florida
    Y’all hear me commenting frequently about “Southern” food. Draw a big Vin diagram with the overlapping circles and you’ll get an understanding of the relationship between:
    Circle #1, Southern food
    Circle #2, Soul food (African-American food) and
    Circle #3, country/farm food.

    They’re totally interdependent.
     
    Robson Valley likes this.
  14. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,372
    Likes Received:
    1,997
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    A friend ( African-American) once tried to shock me telling me about food his grandma fed him as a child.
    I told him that was the food MY mom fed us!
    :)

    Czech/German/Hungarian Soul food......
     
  15. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    15,816
    Likes Received:
    631
    Location:
    Florida
    Was that the pickled pigs’ feet? Chitterlings? Maybe brains and eggs? (Hog brains in scrambled eggs) Head cheese? (You mention d it earlier) All standard fare in a lot of cultures.

    On the other hand the Southern/Soul food likely to be missing from European cultures would include okra, black-eyed peas, cornbread, and watermelon.
     
  16. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,372
    Likes Received:
    1,997
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    Personally I do not enjoy pickled trotters, I like them hot, with horseradish and apple, mustard plus a good Rye bread.
    ( It is traditional to eat boiled Pork bits, like hock, knee, head, trotters with the mix Apple and grated H. radish and so on)

    When he came for dinner, it could be beef tripe, liver, kidneys , or any insides from pig.
    Watermelon is very, very common in Europe. Okra and the b.e. peas not.

    I think the main difference between those 'ethnic' foods is the way they are seasoned, spiced and herbed.
    A huge difference.
     
    santaman2000 likes this.
  17. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2014
    Messages:
    7,648
    Likes Received:
    1,081
    Location:
    McBride, BC
    Patak's have done a very good analysis of regional food across India. Maps and all.
    They started with street food then moved into homes and restautants.
    What they sell allows me to pick and chose the condiments of greatest appeal.

    Krinos did the very same for Greek food. I have all the papers somewhere.
    I like Greek, nice to have my own grapes and grape leaves to cook with.

    It maybe too late but I'd like to see something similar for South and Central America in particular.
    Chef Bayless has done a lot of that for Mexico.

    Fun to find the "pork" and read across cuisines.
     
  18. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,372
    Likes Received:
    1,997
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
  19. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    11,372
    Likes Received:
    1,997
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    I think that Hugh F. - Whittingstall showed how to make a kind of prosciutto using wood ash?
    Years ago as he still had long unruly hair?
     
  20. Keith_Beef

    Keith_Beef Native

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2003
    Messages:
    1,325
    Likes Received:
    229
    Location:
    Yvelines, north-west of Paris, France.
    Everything but the squeal. A great book; I think I have the hardback US edition, picked up second hand years ago. I've read it several times.
     
    Janne likes this.

Share This Page