1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Limpets - how to cook them?

Discussion in 'Lovely Grub' started by Andy BB, Nov 9, 2011.

  1. NikolaTesla

    NikolaTesla New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2012
    Messages:
    213
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Uk
    I think I've seen Ray make them just by making them suck onto a rock, stick it by the fire, and when they release they are dead, then pull off the black bubble of guts or whatever it is, just make sure it's scorching hot.
     
  2. Urban X

    Urban X Nomad

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2012
    Messages:
    272
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Thanet, Kent
    How about a simple Ceviche, a few squeezes of lime juice, some finely chopped chilis, a bit of black pepper? The lime juice will effectively 'cook' the flesh (although it is still raw), it'll help break down some of the proteins, and, as well as marinade the flesh will tenderise it too. Chop up the foot of the limpet, or slice, add the lime juice, chili and pepper, leave for 10-20 mins and mangare.:cool:

    Maybe wrap it in some sun dried Dulce (seaweed), or cook some up, cool it then wrap your Ceviche in it? Cook up some Samphire to go with it. ;)

    Mix up some different citrus juices, the basis should be lime though, have fun, experiment. :)


    Si
     
  3. slowworm

    slowworm Settler

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Messages:
    950
    Likes Received:
    81
    Location:
    Devon
    I quite like them raw as well and I would only eat them from places where I'd happily eat the seaweed, so nice clean beaches away from sewage outlets etc. Not been ill yet...
     
  4. Boucaneer

    Boucaneer Forager

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2012
    Messages:
    209
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    London
    A recipe I have found, it says it's the only way to make them tender. I hope it helps a safer than eating bi-valves such as mussels.


    kelpmonkey
    01-29-2008, 03:22 AM
    Cut off all the outer skin (it's disturbingly like a circumcision actually), get the shell off and get rid of the guts, and by this time the foot will have contracted into what feels like hard plastic. Cut it into very thin strips, the thinnest you can cut, that's key. Press some garlic into a pan with some butter and get it a little browned, then throw in the limpet strips. They'll begin to expand and soften pretty quickly and when they stop they're done. Serve it with a squeeze of lemon and maybe a little black pepper. If someone sees me clean one they'll nearly puke, but after I make them have a taste they usually ask for another.
     
  5. Andy BB

    Andy BB Full Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    3,290
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Hampshire
    that looks ace! Many thanks - will definitely give it a go.
     
  6. dwardo

    dwardo Maker

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    6,138
    Likes Received:
    182
    Location:
    Nr Chester
    Take them out of the shell, cut them in half and they are ready,

    for the hook, place on hook catch a fish then eat the fish instead..
     
  7. John Fenna

    John Fenna Lifetime Member & Maker

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    21,508
    Likes Received:
    895
    Location:
    Pembrokeshire
    Best answer yet!
    Shellfish are all disgusting :(
     
  8. boatman

    boatman Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2007
    Messages:
    2,444
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Cornwall
    Good Friday is trigging day in Cornwall when shellfish are traditionally collected and eaten. Mass foraging is a sight to see. All ages out with their rakes for cockles, mussels being collected and limpets knocked off rocks, winkles are a speciality for the dedicated pin wielder. Little fires and stoves for those picnicking and of course some shellfish being taken home. Couple all this with the continuing beauty of, say, the Helford Estuary.

    This reference is a bit precious but the pics are good.

    http://www.goodcornwallguide.co.uk/warming-to-the-cockles-of-cornwall/
     
  9. Andy BB

    Andy BB Full Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    3,290
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Hampshire
    Shame on you, John! Clams, mussels, cockles. prawns, shrimps, crab, lobster - food of the gods, and in most cases so easy to prepare and cook. And a staple as well of our ancestors. Just have never been able to enjoy limpets, hence this thread - taste is fine, but india-rubber consistency isn't:)
     
  10. Boucaneer

    Boucaneer Forager

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2012
    Messages:
    209
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    London
    Let me know if anybody tries that recipe. It will be a month or so before I get away to the coast. Cheers.
     
  11. fishfish

    fishfish Full Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2007
    Messages:
    2,352
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    wiltshire
    a pit of curry paste will make most things edible!
     
  12. John Fenna

    John Fenna Lifetime Member & Maker

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    21,508
    Likes Received:
    895
    Location:
    Pembrokeshire
    Recipe 1
    Put 6 limpets per person into a pan with a fist sized rock per person (for the limpets to grab onto).
    Boil until the rock is tender.
    Throw away the limpets and eat the rocks (curry paste helps here too some schists taste awful!)
    Seriously - most shellfish (ok - other than prawns, crabs, lobsters and shrimps) hold no attraction for me as they offer so little in calories that they are "starvation foods". The reason that ancient midden heaps of shells are so big is that you need to eat tons of them to get beyond the level of the energy expended being less than the energy consumed per meal!
    The other way of looking at them is that they are "luxury foods" - those you can eat without needing the calories to survive, just for the flavour. I don't like either the flavour or texture of most shellfish!
     
  13. Huon

    Huon Native

    Joined:
    May 12, 2004
    Messages:
    1,327
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Spain
    Perhaps the shellfish in the UK are hard to gather but I assure you that you'd have no problems in NZ for example. It is easy to gather mussels off the rocks there and no problem at all getting enough for a filling meal. The same would apply to other shellfish.
     
  14. John Fenna

    John Fenna Lifetime Member & Maker

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    21,508
    Likes Received:
    895
    Location:
    Pembrokeshire
    Filling - yes...but nutritionally quite poor :)
     
  15. woodspirits

    woodspirits Full Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Messages:
    3,502
    Likes Received:
    269
    Location:
    West Midlands UK
    [QUOTE a Professor of ???? approached me, we chatted then he opened an urchin and offered me the inside.[/QUOTE]#

    Opal, bit harsh was he begging?
     
    #35 woodspirits, Jan 5, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2014
  16. woodspirits

    woodspirits Full Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2009
    Messages:
    3,502
    Likes Received:
    269
    Location:
    West Midlands UK
    sounds a lot of faffin about just to disguise snot? not a fan of shellfish, slugs or snails. :)
     
  17. Huon

    Huon Native

    Joined:
    May 12, 2004
    Messages:
    1,327
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Spain
    Do you have a source for that? I had a quick Google and couldn't find anything to support what you are saying.

    According to what I could find online the cakorific content of shellfish isn't particularly low and in some varieties, like scallops, is quite high.
     
  18. Andy BB

    Andy BB Full Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    3,290
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Hampshire
    Mussels - half the protein of beef by weight, but incredibly easy to gather and take only a few minutes to cook.

    Mussels are a high protein food source. Their low fat content makes them potentially healthier than other protein sources, such as beef, which can contain a lot of saturated fat. Mussels are also low in calories, with raw mussels containing only 70 calories per 3 oz. (85g), including 1.9g of fat (0.4g of which is saturated fat). A comparable amount of lean sirloin beef contains 160 calories and 2.1g of saturated fat. The beef does contain twice the protein of the mussels.

    Mussels are also an excellent source of vitamin B12 and selenium, which is an essential micro-nutrient. Vitamin B12 is important in the functioning of metabolism processes and a deficiency can cause fatigue and depression, as well as other symptoms. One hundred grams of mussels provides around 13% of your daily vitamin C needs and 22% of your daily iron needs. Mussels are also good sources of other B vitamins (particularly folate), phosphorus, manganese and zinc. Mussels are a very good source of omega-3 fatty acids and are considered an excellent seafood choice.

    Shrimps can be gathered from rockpools with a net, and eaten raw - hold head, bite off the rest and chew! (actually tried this, and to be honest tasted just like cooked shrimp - give it a go and see if you agree with me.) And add a bit of seaweed - the greener the tastier (apparently all seaweed around the UK shores is edible) - for your veggies:)
     
  19. Huon

    Huon Native

    Joined:
    May 12, 2004
    Messages:
    1,327
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Spain
    That matches what I found. NZ green lipped mussels are particularly large and supposedly have other benefits too. As kids we'd have no problems gathering enough for a feed in a few minutes when we slept on the beach.
     
  20. John Fenna

    John Fenna Lifetime Member & Maker

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2006
    Messages:
    21,508
    Likes Received:
    895
    Location:
    Pembrokeshire
    30Limpet
    Fortune Summary Diet Suitability Vitamin Mineral Carb Protein Fat Others FAQ
    Fortune - Limpet has a average-calorie, high-carb, low-fat and low-protein content. It is a good source of Calcium, Vitamin A and Vitamin C.

    The food contains 67.92g of carbs. The carbohydrate profile of the the food reveals it is low in complex carbs and very high in Simple carbs. Carbs are our primary source of energy but its source should be chosen with utmost care. Complex carbs are a more desirable addition to your diet, where as simple carbs should be consumed in moderation as it is very easily broken down, assimilated and absorbed in the body. Its very high sugar content puts it in the top 10 percentile. This is often undesirable for people watching their sugar intake.

    Because of its low fat content, it could be suitable option, especially if you're watching your fat intake for health reasons.

    It is also rich in Vitamin C, whose benefits include, but are not limited to protection against immune system deficiencies, cardiovascular disease, prenatal health problems, eye disease, and even skin wrinkling.

    It has a low density of Sodium, thus making it suitable for a low-sodium diet.

    Our comprehensive nutrition ranking methodology, which inspects every nutrition element that this food is composed of, comes up with a nutrition ranking of 30, for Fortune - Limpet, and we advise that this food in moderation.
    Calorie Breakdown
    Calories from Protein 0%
    Calories from Fat 0%
    Calories from Carbs 100%
    Why this is good for you
    Very high in Vitamin C
    No Cholesterol
    No Saturated Fat
    Very low in Sodium
    Why this is bad for you
    Diet Suitability

    Diet Suitability
    Diet Suitability
    Atkins Diet LOW
    Best I could locate in a hurry :)
     

Share This Page