1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hey Guest, We're having our annual Winter Moot and we'd love you to come. PLEASE LOOK HERE to secure your place and get more information.
    For forum threads CLICK HERE
    Dismiss Notice

Going out in the rain, best way to setup a rain shelter?

Discussion in 'Bushcraft and survival skills' started by mari, Feb 27, 2017.

  1. mari

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Still pretty new to bushcraft I don't have much experience setting up a tarp or using special knots. If I wanted to sit down and have a cup of tea in the woods and it's raining what's a good tarp style shelter to setup? What do you usually like to do to for a quick shelter when out and about ?
     
  2. rik_uk3

    rik_uk3 Banned

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2006
    Messages:
    13,320
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    south wales
    Pour a cup of tea or coffee from your flask then set up your tent, easy as that
     
  3. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    12,035
    Likes Received:
    2,165
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    Find a nice bushy pine tree with low branches and sit under it. Natural umbrella.
    Also the best place to sleep as the old needles are nice snd soft.
     
  4. Wander

    Wander Nomad

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2017
    Messages:
    385
    Likes Received:
    350
    Location:
    Here There & Everywhere
    If you have you tarp with you then set it up high enough so you can comfortably sit under it. When it's raining you will have to do everything under the tarp so you want to make sure you have room (and head height) to do what you have to do.
    Unless it's windy, in which case set it low so the wind doesn't blow the rain in.

    Use a simple set up - just a slope in this kind of shape \ (but a bit flatter) With the back of the tarp facing the rain (unless that blocks out a lovely view, in which case it may be worth risking the odd drop of rain for a nice view - amount of wind, rain, and quality of view will dictate that). That way the rain will run off in one direction toward the back. It will be quicker to set up your tarp if you have the quy ropes already attached. You have to accept that you are going to get a bit wet when setting up if it's already raining.

    Another thing to think about is where you pack your tarp in your bag. It should be on top so that you can take it out quickly in bad weather and so you don't have to take other things out first. Even better, if you have a bag with separate pouches and compartments then have it in one of those so you can take out your tarp (and associated bits) without having to open the main compartment and risk getting everything else wet.

    Packing away in the rain you also have to accept things are going to get wet. Pack all your stuff whilst under the tarp and do the tarp last. Obviously. It's a good idea if you have your tarp in a wet bag rather than the non-waterproof bags they come in. That way, when you pack your wet tarp away, all the water will stay with the tarp and not leech out into your bag and soak everything else.

    And don't forget a sit mat for keeping your backside dry!

    Learn and practice your knots and setting up procedure before you go out and that should speed things up and mitigate any soaking.

    And enjoy it! I love being out in the rain with the sound of the rain pattering against the tarp!
     
    #4 Wander, Feb 27, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2017
  5. Dark Horse Dave

    Dark Horse Dave Full Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,673
    Likes Received:
    29
    Location:
    Surrey / South West London
    Good advice from Wander there. A slightly quicker option is to use bungees rather than guylines.
     
  6. bearbait

    bearbait Full Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    835
    Likes Received:
    94
    Location:
    Mid-Wales, UK and British Columbia, Canada
    Take a look at the Tarp Tutorial on DD Hammocks site. Also try Googling 'tarp setups'. There are also assorted vids on YouTube.

    I use a tarp as well wherever possible when camping in a tent, even if the weather's not inclement, e.g. use as a sunshade. It's good to have an admin area and to cook under, plus one doesn't have to sit around in the tent if the weather's bad. Also good when breaking camp as it's the last thing one takes down and all the packing away can be done under cover.

    If there are no trees around I'll rig it off my car on a campsite.
     
  7. Jaeger

    Jaeger Full Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2014
    Messages:
    670
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    Aye Up,

    If I know that I'm staying out and using a tarp I usually set up a simple ridge tent style basher,

    But if I'm out just for a bimble with the chance of rain and need a quick shelter for a brew/maybe some wildlife obs I use this-

    Jaegerschack(i).jpg

    http://www.bushcraftuk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=139851
     
  8. mari

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2017
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Cheers for the advice guys gonna get stuck in with this on the weekend hopefully
     
  9. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2016
    Messages:
    12,035
    Likes Received:
    2,165
    Location:
    Grand Cayman, Norway, Sweden
    It may sound naff, but when I used to do walks of a week or more, I used to carry an oversized plastic rubbish bag. I cut holes for the arms and head.
     
  10. Le Loup

    Le Loup Nomad

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2007
    Messages:
    308
    Likes Received:
    102
    Location:
    Wychwood Forest, New England, Australia.
    In my opinion a simple lean-to type shelter using an oilcloth is the easiest to set up & use. Very versatile & can even be used as a rain cape if caught out on the trail. There are many ways of utilizing a small oilcloth, but the easiest is to use to standing trees or saplings & attach a cross bar. Tie the canvas to the two trees, peg out the remaining two corners of the canvas. You can make the pegs on site. Then get a bush pole & put it over the cross bar & under the canvas & slide it all the way down to the bottom of the canvas & a little beyond. This will put a slight ridge in the center of the canvas & it will tighten the canvas.
    This type of shelter will allow you to light a fire for warmth & cooking close to your bed area so you can cook & stoke the fire without getting wet.
    Keith.
    [video=youtube;fUHU1WgLjbA]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUHU1WgLjbA[/video]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Whittler Kev

    Whittler Kev Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Messages:
    4,301
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    March, UK
  12. TarHeelBrit

    TarHeelBrit Full Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2014
    Messages:
    687
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Alone now.
    Nothing naff about that at all. I used to carry two of the 55 gallon heavy duty contractor clean up bags in the bag for my wife and I if we took a late season hike in the Chugach. Also came in handy for trail maintenance as tourists haven't heard of "Leave no trace" we would pack out their rubbish left behind.
     
  13. JaspP

    JaspP Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2017
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    London
    Definitely not naff... I always carry around a plastic bag with me just in case... it's also quite a nice way to keep yourself dry whilst setting up the tarp!
     

Share This Page