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Gator Season's Open

Discussion in 'Fair Game' started by santaman2000, Aug 31, 2018.

  1. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    This one was caught this week locally:

    "The gator, measuring 13 feet, 6 and 3/4 inches, is believed to weigh close to 1,000 pounds."

    "By WENDY VICTORA
    Posted Aug 29, 2018 at 1:02 PM Updated Aug 29, 2018 at 1:02 PM



    If you live in Freeport and hang around Basin Bayou, you’ve probably seen him. Local folks, especially fishermen, have been watching a giant gator in the small bayou all summer.

    And on Friday night, there were at least five boats filled with gator hunters, all hoping to glimpse him again.

    In the end, he was brought down by two men and a boy who hooked him and lost him and found him again. The gator, measuring 13 feet, 6 and 3/4 inches, is believed to weigh close to 1,000 pounds.

    “We tried every way,” said Dalton Morrison, who was out there with his dad, Tilton, and a family friend, 11-year-old Cade Nick. “We couldn’t get him loaded in the boat.”

    Finally, they tied him to the cleats of the boat and towed him to shore. It took seven grown men and Cade to tug him from the water into a freezer truck.

    PHOTOS: Nearly 1,000-lb giant gator caught in Basin Bayou




    Dalton, who is a gator and hog hunting guide, said Bass Pro Shops has reached out to him about buying the gator’s skin for a display. The meat will be vacuum packed and eaten.

    An officer from Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission came out to see the gator and guessed its weight at between 900 and 1,000 pounds, Morrison said.

    The animal put up quite a fight. He first showed himself around 1 a.m., but he got away after a 45-minute fight,

    Related content
    PHOTOS: Nearly 1,000-lb giant gator caught in Basin Bayou

    “We were all depressed and aggravated,” Morrison said. “There was a little bit of yelling going on. Finally Cade said, ‘Let’s go look for another one. I don’t even care if it’s a little one. I just want to get one.’”

    They went over to the grassy shoreline and were shining lights down into the water when they spotted the gator in about 2 feet of water. After a couple of hours and a lot of rope burn, they subdued him.

    “He drug us all over the bayou,” Morrison said. “We wore him down. (Wildlife officials) want to make sure you got the gator completely in your control. With a 14-foot creature, they’re never really in your control.”


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  2. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    He/she could have lots and lots of fine, strong babies.
     
  3. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Depends upon the survivorship/mortality curve like life insurance = they are not humans.
    Gimme a sack of lemons and a bag of bread crumbs and let me fix you a feed.
     
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  4. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    A gator that size is probably at least 50 to 60 years old. They lay dozens of eggs in a single laying/nesting. But!!!!! (see below)

    Exactly. Out of each nesting only a very few survive the first year. Out of those only a few survive another year. After that they have few enemies except other gators ---- yes, they're canbalistic (they'll be a foot or more long by the second year)
     
  5. sunndog

    sunndog Full Member

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    They need an implant that makes them hunt snakeheads and such lol
     
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  6. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    In a balanced population each pair can inly produce a couple of offspring that lives until they reproduce.
    Or the population would explode.
    I think that was what I was taught by my biology teacher.
     
  7. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    LOL. The gator population HAS exploded in the last 40 years or so. So has their range.
     
  8. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Interesting! That is fantastic, most other animal species worlwide are in decline.
    Many native species decline, invasive species spread.

    I am assuming they are repopulating their old territories?

    Eating the meat of a such old animal, is it really nice?
     
  9. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Not just their old territories; they've expanding well beyond. There are now viable populations as far north as the mid Atlantic (Virginia and the Carolinas) and as far west as the foot of the Ozarks (Arkansas)
     
  10. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    So technically invasive.
    308Win ?
     
  11. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I'm not sure you can call a natural expansion invasive though. 308? No. Not for hunting them anyway. Baited fishing tackle and then a small caliber (often as light as a 22LR) behind the ear. Read the article and you'll see they fought it as it pulled the boat around the bayou for quite a while.
     
  12. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    As it is on the same continent maybe it can not be called 'invasive'. I have seen how they catch gators in that series ( forgot the name) and always marveled how they shoot them with a .22.

    I personally would prefer to keep well away from those teeth and use something stronger! :)
     
  13. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Yeah I saw a few episodes of the series too (Swamp People) and wasn't really impressed. Until a few days ago Ididn't know how they were hunted for real either (I didn't trust the show) I've just been reading a little more this gator season.
     
  14. Duggie Bravo

    Duggie Bravo Nomad

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    Seems a shame to kill something so magnificent, but at least it will be eaten, so not wasted.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  15. sunndog

    sunndog Full Member

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    Depends how many of those magnificent creatures there are. Or how many people are willing to have them living in their garden
     
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  16. Duggie Bravo

    Duggie Bravo Nomad

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    Oh I get that, I’m speaking as someone who lives on a different continent and the most dangerous animal I’m likely to come across at the bottom of my garden is a squirrel.


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  17. sunndog

    sunndog Full Member

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    Aye the Americans can have the squirrels back too lol
     
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  18. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    There are 3 different animal survivorship curves for mortality. No, you cannot push a species from one curve to another.
    Start with 1,000 eggs/babies and watch.

    Humans have High Survivorship/Low Mortality = Good probability of living a long % of the known life span.

    Moose and Robins (birds) have Consistent Mortality. They die off at a steady rate for the whole know live span ( moose = 20 years max).

    Alligators (?), insects and most fish have High Mortality/ Low Survivorship.
    The definition is that 50% of the population dies within the first 15% of the lifespan ( or worse.) This is absolutely normal.

    This is real ecology, not Dr. Google.
     
  19. forrestdweller

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    so has the population of homo ""sapiens" "...
     
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