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Fish hooks

Discussion in 'DIY and Traditional crafts' started by Tank, Feb 13, 2016.

  1. Tank

    Tank Full Member

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    Hi All,

    Today I had a go at making a fish hook with a bone barb. Which turned out ok, if not a little big.

    [​IMG]

    Can anyone suggest any good website with more examples as I am stuggling to find this type of fish hook. Espicalally interest how best to bait these and size verse targeted species.

    Edit : or suggested books?


    Cheers
    Tim
     
    #1 Tank, Feb 13, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2016
  2. Mesquite

    Mesquite Anyone for sailing?

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    That's a neat bit of binding you've done goodjob

    The book you want is Indian Fishing: Early Methods of Northwest Pacific by Hilary Stewart. It tells you exactly how they were made and used for fishing. Unfortunately it's out of print and highly sought after so it may take you some time and money to get hold of it.

    I've got a small section which I use for reference when I demonstrate how to make these hooks at the moot.

    [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Tank

    Tank Full Member

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    Thanks, it was good to have a go, hopefully the first of many.

    The book seems perfect, shame it's going to be so hard to come by but will keep my eye out.

    Thanks for the screen shot. Very helpful.
     
  4. Mesquite

    Mesquite Anyone for sailing?

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    Try getting hold of spruce roots, split them down and do the binding with that.

    It's the traditional way to make them and fun learning how to split the root :)

    As for the book here's a taster of it, unfortunately the salmon trolling hook section isn't amongst what's shown :(
     
  5. Tank

    Tank Full Member

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    That's my next step to try, hopefully will be out in a week or two to collect some and give it a go.

    Thanks for the site I will check it out.
     
  6. Fraxinus

    Fraxinus Settler

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    Uncle Ray shows the method here
    [video]https://youtu.be/AGIFS3EI1KY[/video]

    I set it to start just before the fish hook bit. Apologies if you've seen it before Tim, just thought it pertinent to the thread.


    Rob.
     
  7. Mesquite

    Mesquite Anyone for sailing?

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    Good video but it didn't start at the fish hook :) Go to 14:30 for the relevant bit :cool:
     
  8. crosslandkelly

    crosslandkelly A somewhat settled

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    Mesquite showed me how to make these at the Moot last year. Split pine roots, two with carved pine barbs and the smallest has a SeaBuckthorn barb.

    fishhooks 002.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Tomteifi

    Tomteifi Nomad

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    Good work, a thinner waxed twine would help to downscale things and get it to a more useable size. It looks a bit cumbersome at the scale it is at the moment. Whats its actual dimensions?
    0.5mm dia. natural hemp twine has a single strand breaking strain of about 8lbs. so hook wrapping would infinitely increase that and allow you to make a smaller scaled useable hook.
    Tom.
     
    #9 Tomteifi, Feb 14, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2016
  10. Macaroon

    Macaroon A bemused & bewildered

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    Try using Blackthorn spikes for the barbs, very strong and I can definitely attest to their sharpness :(
     
  11. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    While there are no explanations, Google UBC/MOA and get into the online collection of some 44,000 artifacts. You can then select fish hook and sort the examples.
    University of British Columbia/Museum of Anthropology.
     
  12. Reverend Graham

    Reverend Graham Full Member

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  13. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Thanks, Rev. Excellent read. Interesting to note that the Maori bent the living trees to generate the hook shank shapes that they wanted.
     
  14. Joonsy

    Joonsy Native

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    nice work (perhaps you could have used horse hair for the whipping, hard to tell from pics but i'm guessing it would be thinner than cord used), just to add, what you have made is what would actually be called a ''barbless'' hook in todays fishing language, that is a hook with no backward facing barb, fish can easily shake a barbless hook from the mouth if the line goes slack. if you look at the pics in the link RG has provided some of the hooks do have backward facing barbs, these would hold a fish better. The toggle type of ''hook'' is an interesting one as well, the line is attached to the centre of the toggle which rotates to it's widest point when tension is applied to the line.
     
  15. Joonsy

    Joonsy Native

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    just to add to above comment tank about barbs. if you have ever watched pole and line fishing for tuna etc you will see the difference a barb on a hook makes, in pole and line fishing a barbless hook is used for the very reason that it falls out of the fish's mouth when line goes slack, the fish is swung out of the water in one big swoop and the hook drops out of the fishs mouth when the line goes slack as the fish hits the deck, for other types of fishing for the pot a barbed hook is better when it needs to hold when there is slack line in the system. Have fun, ATB.
     
  16. Tank

    Tank Full Member

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    Very nice, thanks for sharing. I will hopefully sharing my next ones soon with the spruce root bindings.
     
  17. Tank

    Tank Full Member

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    Thanks, shame he doesn't show more of the carving as I found that bit the hardest.
     
  18. Mesquite

    Mesquite Anyone for sailing?

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    I'll see if I can find the other page ive got that shows the carved part better
     
  19. Tank

    Tank Full Member

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    Now with spruce root binding
    [​IMG]
     
  20. crosslandkelly

    crosslandkelly A somewhat settled

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    That's very nice. goodjob
     

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