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First aid kit

Discussion in 'Hygiene and First Aid / Medicinal' started by bushblade, Apr 9, 2010.

  1. jamesraykenney

    jamesraykenney Forager

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    20 pounds!!! Yikes!!! And I thought the things were expensive in the US!!!
    Are you talking about these things?
    http://www.chinookmed.com/cgi-bin/i...raeli-Emergency-Bandage---4"-----------------
    Google says:
    5.36 US dollars = 3.4699 British pounds sterling
    You are being ripped off to an amazing degree!
    I would think that, even with shipping, you would come out cheaper ordering from them... And surely someone in the UK or in AU has them cheaper! Try Ebay if nothing else!
    Do you have a VAT in AU? If so, would it even apply to medical supplies?
     
  2. bushblade

    bushblade Nomad

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    Hi, yeah thats the one sorry for the confusion. The Israeli type are not expensive in the UK £4 or £5 usualy for the 4".
     
  3. aus bushcrafter

    aus bushcrafter New Member

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    yer they are called first field dressings. but the aus ones have field wound dressing on them but are know as ffds though. they are called that in America as well. you guys started the ffd pouch when you introduced the m56 webbing and was/is know as a ffd pouch.
     
  4. Martyn

    Martyn New Member

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    We paid £3.40 on the group buy from the UK distributor for the Israeli manufacturer, but still needed 12p for paypal and then shipping on top. It came out at about £4 per bandage if you bought more than 4 I think, so provided you collect em and pay cash (and buy more than 100), £3.40 is prolly the cheapest you can get em for in the UK. Very good they are too. They were brand new from the distributor though, you might get em cheaper from the surplus market. They are a bandage you hope you'll never need, but with their vacuum packing and double bagging, you can pretty much ignore the expiry date on em. One in the backpack, one in the car and one in t he FAK at home and you're sorted.
     
    #44 Martyn, Sep 5, 2010
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2010
  5. Davey569

    Davey569 Full Member

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    Guys the UK FFDs have been replaced by newer ones that are very similar to the israeli ones. They are double wrapped, vaccum packed, have an elasticated bandage and have a clip on the end. ;)
     
  6. MSkiba

    MSkiba Settler

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    Would just like to say after seeing this post I was inspired and upgraded my first aid kit. As someone pointed out we play with sharp things in the middle of no where. Even if your very careful dosnt mean others around you are also as careful.
     
  7. Dornal

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    This is a thought, but nothing much more than that. A lot of the stuff here is expensive but widely available in health care. For example, a couple of plastic snap-off vials of sterile saline seems like a very nice thing to have for cleaning a wound or washing an eye. As a doctor, when I am on the wards I always carry this sort of stuff for everyday jobs. If you know anyone that works near the wards, then a couple of these is no expense, and, without condoning theft, is the kind of thing that one finds in your pockets at the end of most days. Ask about, sterile saline is about the most useful small thing I can think of.

    Now, I am not sure how well this might work, but company reps are a source of free stuff.

    Myself, I won't meet with them or take anything from them, as I would like to be able to say to my patients that I am unbiased. However, if the ongoing finance of medical care is not at stake, then I would say to take a punt on them. E.g. https://forms.bd.com/pasrst/index.sp This is an elastic roll perforated at about 9 inches which is great for taking blood, (N.B. the use of tourniquet is tricky and NOT part of a basic first aid kit) but I reckon would be very useful for a lot of other stuff.

    Basically, if you have a reasonable reason to ask for samples of medical (non-pharmacological) supplies, such as a first-aider, and don't have a public budget under your control, then I think it would be ethically reasonable to present yourself as such, and see if they will send you anything.
     
    Darryl of Sussex likes this.
  8. mikeybear

    mikeybear Forager

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    Sure I only paid about 50p each for 20ml vials at a large high st chemist, very useful

    MB
     
  9. RV OPs

    RV OPs Guest

    Hi there, this is our first post. We have been sent samples of Adventure Medical First Aid Kits. At first glance they appear to be well stocked with essential first aid items, waterproofed bag etc etc and on a par with the first aid kit from Bushblade . Has anyone used them, if so, do you have any feedback and recommendations?
     
    #49 RV OPs, Sep 21, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 22, 2010
  10. bushblade

    bushblade Nomad

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    Hi, the adventure medical kits are pretty good in my opinion as an off the shelf option, though I think it always best to tailor make your own kits to your own needs/skills.
    I would advise anyone using the AMK first aid kits to check which sort of aloksak they are packaged in as the ones with black tops tend to split very easily near the zip lock. Its easily solved or prevented by taping the area with something like gorilla tape or tenacious tape a full width across on both sides of the bag.
    I've noticed that Lifesystems seem to be making their own version of the AMK kits now too.

    The book that comes with the larger AMK kits is very good. There is a free pdf available somewhere too but I can't remember where from :confused:
    If anyone wants it pm me and I'll happily email it.
     
  11. axemangler

    axemangler Tenderfoot

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    I bought a couple of water proof clear plastic boxes with chords to hang round your neck.....I filled them with lots of medical supplies that I know would be needed in the field including butterfly sutures, they cost a £1.00 each from pound land and carry enough gear for the worst of medical calamities out in the field....I also carry a small jar of Tiger Balm..medical mostly but great for lighting fires.
     
  12. Evilgoblin

    Evilgoblin Member

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    The Israeli style dressings are very good, however may not be enough on their own, especially if you manage to get an artery or remove a significant portion of your body. I carry a small blow out kit for dealing with traumatic injury. 2 x Israeli FFD as one won't necessarily be enough depending on how bad the bleed is.

    I also carry a CAT torniquet

    [​IMG]

    Great for controlling bleeding fast in the pre-hospital setting.

    I like Quikclot too, incredibly effective in concert with the CAT.

    [​IMG]

    There is now a "sport" version available which is the same as the military stuff just in a civified packet. The cheapest place I have found for it is here

    http://www.stjohnsupplies.co.uk/products/default.asp?productId=F90108

    I was also asked to provide a list for a personal 1st aid kit for a trip into the jungle and I came up with this, might be of interest:

    I was asked for some advice on a first aid kit for the jungle on another forum, here's what I posted.

    The biggest contributing factor to ill health in the jungle is the environment itself. The humid damp conditions are great for all sorts of interesting fungi and bacteria to grow with wild abandon. As with any medical issue prevention is better then a cure.

    Your first task is to look to yourself, your basic fitness and general well being before you hit the bush are very important. An individual who is physically fit will adapt to new environments more rapidly and with less stress on the body. Secondly get any underlying health issues squared away before you go, even the most minor you'd be amazed what a mild case of athletes foot can turn into! What ever it is, as far as is possible, get it resolved before you go away as the extreme environmental conditions can massively amplify even the most simple of health issues.

    Next task is protection. Given all the exciting beasties which live in the bush your primary task should be to prevent them getting access to you, or more specifically the inside of your body. Forget about looking alli in the bush, shirt tucked in, top button done up, cuffs done up and full brim on your bush hat. Get yourself a mossie headnet, you'll look like a nob but it'll bring some comfort. Wear some fingerless cycling type gloves to protect the backs of your hands. Next protect from sunburn, you won't always be under the tree canopy. The best product for this is a brand called P20 you can get it in superdrug and Sainsburys. It's a factor 30 sun block but the best thing about it is that it is an oil which soaks into the skin and stays there, you can't sweat it off and it doesn't come off in the rain. I have used this in many different types of environment and it has never let me down. Next keep the beasties away, don't miss the opportunity to get your clothing treated with permethrin. If you can don't stop at your clothes get your doss bag and mossie net done too. You'll also need a personal mossie rep. There's been lots written about Avon moisturizer used by them etc, to my mind get something that's Deet based as it's tried and tested. Something I found also helped was to take garlic supplements. You can buy these from health food shops, after you've been taking them for a while it begins to come out through your pores and the mossies hate it. Don't panic, you won't end up smelling like an Italian waiter's apron, it's why Mediterranean types don't get bitten much, it's the garlic in their diet. Also to bear (sic) in mind is that your warm sweaty bits are going to be even warmer and sweatier in the bush. This is the kind of environment that fungi love! First off make sure that you give all these bits a good scrub every day. Don't use soap an it can dry skin out leading to other problems. Once you're clean and dry give your groin and feet a good dusting with and anti-fungal powder like mycota or similar. Also try to avoid getting exercise claw, get that Norwegian formula hand cream and use it liberally, cracked skin is a great source of ingress for all sorts of nasties.

    The bush being what it is, you will get lots of little cuts, scrapes and bites. The key thing here is to ensure that you keep them clean. Get some antiseptic wipes, again easily available from boots etc, give the wound a good clean and then seal it with either synthskin, which you paint on, or the elastoplast spray advertised on telly looks quite good. Right, insect bites next. Don't scratch them! Anthisan do a great product, it's a little spray bottle, like a breath freshener, an couple of squirts from that and the itch just goes away. A tube of witch hazel gel is good for bites and stings too. Don't pull leeches off, you'll probably leave the mouth parts in your skin an bleed like a bugger! Drip mossie rep on them and they'll just drop off. Burning them off with a lit cigarette is also really dumb, it looks macho but isn't very effective.

    Sorry to be so long winded but there's no point in giving you a list of things to buy without explaining what they're for. See more comprehensive list below:-


    P20 sun cream
    Deet based mossie rep
    Garlic supplements
    Anti-fungal foot powder
    Canestan cream (for if the foot powder doesn't do the job)
    Norwegian formula hand cream
    Antiseptic wipes
    Synth-skin/elastoplast spray
    Anthisan bite relief spray
    Witch hazel gel
    Loratadine tablets ( this is the active ingredient in Claratyn, cheaper to buy boots own, use this for any more extreme reactions to bites/stings)
    Vasaline (use on eyebrows to make sweat run away from eyes)
    Sudocrem (Big gray tub in the baby section, use for sweat rash especially soothing on the bum!)
    Zinc Oxide tape (Get the issue version, the stuff for sale on the high street just isn't up to the mark)
    Tweezers (Get pointy medical ones, eyebrow ones are no good for getting hold of thorns etc)
    Sterile cannula set (good to have your own stuff if you're going somewhere outside Brit med chain, and good for digging out thorns etc)
    Alcohol hand gel (use before eating or preparing food and after a ****)
    Aloe Vera gel (great if you do get caught out by the sun look in the sun tan section)
    Lucozade/powerade powder (or similar electrolytic to aid with hydration)
    Paracetamol
    Ibuprofen
    Anusol
    Plasters

    That should just about cover it, add any medicines you take regularly and of course any anti-malarials etc

    Sorry for the enormous post :p
     
  13. Martyn

    Martyn New Member

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    Surely you dont carry that lot in the UK?
     
  14. Evilgoblin

    Evilgoblin Member

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    No just the blow out kit of the 2 FFDs, CAT and Quikclot. I grew up near the Old Spitalfields Market and you would often see a trainee butcher being wheeled across the road to A&E on a gurney with one of his mates standing up on it with his boot in the lads groin stopping the femoral bleed. It's not impossible to do some pretty nasty injuries with machetes and axes if you're a novice to them. I usually carry a small boo boo kit too for dealing with snivels etc.
     
  15. Martyn

    Martyn New Member

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    You an army medic by any chance?

    I can get me head round one israeli dressing, but 2 seems a bit overkill. But the CAT and quikclot are out there. Both are almost never used by the professionals in the UK - in fact are banned in most areas - because they prefer to save the limb - or rather, to stop over enthusiastic first aiders jumping in with the magic powder when they dont need to. Our population density and ambulance response times make that kit pretty much redundant.
     
  16. Evilgoblin

    Evilgoblin Member

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    Guilty as charged, just retired after ten years. Don't underestimate the amount of blood that can be lost. If you cut your femoral artery and it is left unstopped you will lose consciousness in 30 seconds and die in 3 minutes. You wouldn't have finished making the 999 call by then. Front-line medical personnel in the UK (amb tech,HEMS, paramedics etc) now routinely carry CATs and Quikclot. I hear what you're saying about the over enthusiastic amateur however given the response times it is nigh on impossible to do any lasting damage to limbs from a tourniquet being on too long. Quikclot also has an undeserved bad reputation. The new stuff no does not have an exothermic reaction so does not do any damage if used on a smaller wound. It also now comes with the powder contained in a "teabag" which eliminates the issue of the powder blowing into eyes etc which is why there was a great reluctance for civilian emergency services to use it when it first came out. The change has come about due to large numbers of Reservist medical personnel deploying on operations in Afghanistan and Iraq over the last 6 years or so, seeing the benefits of this equipment in action and bringing it into service in their own NHS Trusts. As for their banning both items are readily available for purchase without any caveat that one must hold any kind of professional registration.
     
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  17. Evilgoblin

    Evilgoblin Member

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  18. seb.h

    seb.h Member

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    You mean a tampon right?:p
     
  19. Sniper

    Sniper Native

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    Whilst absolutely true, you must remember that you can buy a car without having a license it does not mean you can drive it. You could bring down all sorts of legal problems if you used this stuff as a layperson on any member of the public. I am well aware that no person has ever been prosecuted for trying to help a casualty even when they did the wrong thing but in these days of "no win, no fee" ambulance chasing law firms it may just be a matter of time before it does happen sadly. No plane loads of people were ever hijacked and aimed at a tall building before 9-11. So caution is advised. I may be wrong however my job keeps me bang up to date with all things first aid and to the best of my belief it is still illegal outside the emergency services ie Air Ambulance, Paramedics, hospital A&E Units, and the military to use this stuff.
     
  20. Martyn

    Martyn New Member

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    I dont mean banned as in you cant buy it, I mean banned as in hospitals and ambulance services have ordered their employees not to use it. I cant use it even if I wanted to and I do hold a professional registration. Having said that, I've stopped many arterial bleeds with nothing more than direct pressure, although they were surgical trauma, which is much easier to control. Quik-clot is a field expedient solution for soldiers under fire and has limited applicability in civilian medicine. You also wont find ambulance staff using tourniquets to stop bleeding in all but the most extreme circumstances. Traumatic amputation and femoral arterial bleeds are pretty darned rare in civilian life. My concern with the free availability and "popularity" among the armed services of both Quik-clot and Cat-tourniquets, is that civilians will emulate soldiers and military medics and use them without training, skill or knowledge as a first option, rather than a last option, or at all. Civvis see military medics and mountain rescue teams using this and see it as must have kit, when nothing could be further from the truth. I am a huge fan of the Israeli bandage though, cracking dressing and really should be part of any first aid kit, especially for people using knives, axes or chainsaws.
     
    #60 Martyn, Dec 9, 2010
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2010
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