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Decent sewing needles and thread

Discussion in 'Resources' started by Barn Owl, Jun 25, 2011.

  1. Herman30

    Herman30 Nomad

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    You?! Oh, I only read the first post by Barn Owl.
     
  2. petrochemicals

    petrochemicals Full Member

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    Secret to threading is a very sharp knife or pair of scissors. If it doesn't work first time, cut the end again. Do not wet the end or pull the end. I manage most needles with gutterman heavy duty polyester which is quite thick. Longer needles usually have a bigger eye.
     
  3. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    That rather depends on the 'long'. I have a lot of long ones with tiny little egg shaped eyes....long eyed needles are crewel needles, meant for embroidery using either cotton or wool, that's why they have the longer eye.
    Not saying they can't be used for normal hand sewing, and many prefer them for it, but the long eye means that there's more chance of the thread end slipping out if it's not 'thick'.

    I sew with everything from superfine silk to heavyweight buttonhole twist. I change the needle I use to suit the fabric and thread.

    Gutterman's good thread, but the HDPoly is a tad muckle for putting up the hem on a pair of trousers. Good for sewing the button back on though :)

    M
     
  4. Keith_Beef

    Keith_Beef Native

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    Look around car boot sales, bric-a-brac shops, and the like, for sewing boxes.

    Very often, these will come up in house clearances, they are usually stuffed full of old bobbins of thread and with old needles.

    You'll probably end up with a load of embroidery threads, too, or a handful of crochet hooks, that you might not want, but I'm sure you can find somebody on here who would find a use for them.

    Don't be put off by a little bit of surface tarnish on a good needle; you can polish that away and if necessary sharpen the point (get a little grooved stone for sharpening fish hooks).
     
  5. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    Another good point; good needles are worth saving. Oxalic acid, wash well, gently buff up back to complete smoothness, and the needle will still be better than the carp stuff in most modern packs.

    Be careful around the eye, dental floss with a little very fine stropping compound works well.

    If you come across very fine, old, easy threaders in fair condition...the ones with the finest slip through at the side of the eye, not at the end of the eye, I will happily re-imburse or barter :D

    M
     

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