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Cold steel special forces shovel

Discussion in 'Kit Chatter' started by Mowmow, Nov 23, 2017.

  1. John Fenna

    John Fenna Lifetime Member & Maker

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    I use a couple of sites on a regular basis - every so often the poo trench needs digging - 6'x1'x1' ish.
    Too much for a little trowel!
     
  2. Jared

    Jared Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Crikey, they still want £65 on ebay for that Chinese military shovel, the WJQ-308
     
  3. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I understsnd....
    But the weight?
     
  4. John Fenna

    John Fenna Lifetime Member & Maker

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    My sites do not need a long walk in....
     
  5. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I guess you did proper outdoor latrines for your ‘second home’.

    In the one I had back in UK I did one. Simple, just a nice smoothed log between two trees, a deep hole, spoil on the side to cover.

    Beats an indoor loo hands down!
     
  6. Wayne

    Wayne BCUK Welfare Officer
    Mod

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    I have a cold steel spetznas shovel in the van permanently. Great utility tool. I use it for cooking. Moving coals around when baking with Dutch ovens.

    I throw it along with my knives. Easier or beginners to use than tomahawks.

    I split wood with it for the Kelly kettle when I’m too lazy to get an axe or froe.

    Occasionally I even dig with it.
     
  7. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Sounds ;like a very versatile tool!
     
  8. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Btw, does not the British Army have some kind of similar entrenching spade?
    ( this is the main use for these short spades, to dig a protective berm in front if you while under fire)
     
  9. Mowmow

    Mowmow Forager

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    I'm sure they do Janne! Though i think they use some kind of folding shovel.

    Just an update for you all, I bought one sometime last year (spring?) and have used it quite a few times since, mostly for trips not far away from a car although I have lugged it on a few short (10-25 mile) walks or trips to campsites with full packs.

    I can safely say that whilst not the lightest tool it comes in very handy and I feel is worth it's weight when mostly camping.

    Digs stuff for toilets n firepits, drains, fishing bait, slinging ammo(stones).
    Cuts poles and delimbs for shelters and makes nice tent pegs and hammers them in nicely.
    Clears paths through light brush (think poor machete lol).
    Will process firewood: will chop, will split, will scrape/"feather", but not ideal! Though you could get sparks from it too.
    Useful for managing the fire; covering it, moving coals, collecting ash for various uses. Imagine would be good for use with a dutch oven.
    I use it for collecting the white ash and charcoal for different jobs.
    Is essentially a giant spoon/plate and while i'd never eat from it it's a good little dry flat-ish work surface, scrape up sap, stick your tinder on it, whatever.
    Good little hammer.
    Improvised pry.
    Would be very handy for those who forage wild edibles (i'm slowly getting into it!)

    Holds a decent edge but not if you throw it and miss the wood!
    Sharpens very easily though.
    The case it came with is very handy and pretty well made and a necessity i might add.
    I like the size and weight, just about right for packing in and out of camp on shorter distance, longer stay trips and most camp chores.
    Quality of construction and value for money is brilliant.

    Has replaced my Skrama for a lot of trips as it will do a lot of the same jobs and is more versatile for about the same weight and don't mind abusing it as much. It's also less intimidating than a seax (Although it will never replace the Skrama, that's my favourite bush tool, i loved rambo as a kid, what can i say)

    It is not ultra light but it is a shovel after all.
    The handle will rub your hands raw and is very shiny and slippery at first but I pulled a bicycle innertube over it and it's solved most of that and probably made it a bit more shock absorbent and protects it a bit + always have emergency firelighter on hand.
    Is definitely more of a break up and scrape tool rather than a proper digger but for anything more than what i said above youd probably bring along the right tool for the job anyway lol
    Definitely beats a digging stick though.
    Its no carver for finer stuff but knocking up a few camp implements like pot hangers n tent pegs n tripods n what not it's fine.

    Could be handy for fishermen, useful for gathering bait or carving steps on steep slippery banks.
    Have seen it used as a improv paddle.
    Seen improvised handles for extended length or use as a hoe or mattock type device.
    Handle could be removed and the head could be used to fashion one by itself in the field. (Seen folks who have used theirs a lot more than mine on the web do this sort of stuff, zachary fowler for one)

    Overall i'm really surprised at how much i do like it as, while it doesnt do any particular job amazingly well. It does just seem to have a million and one uses and always find something different to use it for when it gets packed along.

    It's a good little all round camp tool if ya not planning on building a log cabin or hiking for miles upon miles a day carving spoons everytime you set up camp.

    It does also take a while to get used to how to use it properly if you do decide to use it for wood working.

    It's a fun little gimmick (throwing/self defence shovel) but its also actually a good little tool.

    Sorry for the lengthy read, i suppose a lot of that is just rambling on n stuff youd expect anyway but its done now lol.

    I'll probably update you aĺl again after its had some more field time. Let you know how its all holding up, more of what i do like and what i dont like, etc.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
     
    mole trapper, JohnC and Janne like this.
  10. Rootless Urbanite

    Rootless Urbanite New Member

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    Just thought I'd add a reply to this post for recent purchasers.

    I picked up a Cold Steel shovel and unlike the examples I'd seen it had a painted bevel, and rather than sharp it had an unfinished grinding burr, chipped in places the whole length. I didn't have to sign for it or send age verification to the retailer -- Springfields -- which makes me think it's being sold as unsharpened by UK retailers. It's gonna take some work to sharpen it to machete standard. I don't know if it's just this one retailer that has these unfinished ones or what's going on but was a bit disappointed. eBay might be better option to get the US version. That said, I got a decent handle [minus the varnish], and its a decent little shovel. I might just sharpen a single side and leave the rest unfinished.
     
  11. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

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    I think it’s generally accepted that these are require a fair bit of fettling to get an edge. Personally I think that’s a good thing, the majority of people wanting a compact shovel want it to use as such, chuck it in the back of the car and not worry about slicing their car tyres while clearing mud or snow. I’ve got a German Army entrenching tool and though it has the heft for cutting, that’s not what I want it for. The US versions on the Cold Steel site seem to show a much more refined cutting tool than the ones from Springfields or Amazon.
     
  12. Rootless Urbanite

    Rootless Urbanite New Member

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    Yeah, I agree. I've an now putedge on one of the sides with a file, then corse stone & bit of finishing. Don't see why I'll need much else. It's just funny all the pics I've seen of these have unpainted bevels all around, described as sharp.
     

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