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Canned Bread?

Discussion in 'Lovely Grub' started by Fraxinus, Jul 30, 2015.

  1. GGTBod

    GGTBod Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    I'll take your word for it M, i reckon i'd need to be seriously hungry to even try corned beef or tinned ham nowadays, what's that saying about too much of a good thing spoiling it?? Well too much of a thing that is not so good is even worse
     
  2. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    I don't even eat meat, and Himself doesn't eat very much. Occasionally though, even my venison and goose fed husband takes a notion to a bit of something really bad for him, and suggests that he might like corned beef fritters or the like.
    I admit that I do keep a couple of tins of ham, a couple of tins of chicken breast in white sauce (quickest filling for vol au vents or chicken curry on the planet :D ) and a couple of tins of corned beef and bacon grill, in the pantry. I grew up in the days when freezers were a tiny wee box at the top of the fridge that could 'maybe' hold a couple of trays of ice cubes. I use the freezer, but I'm always conscious that if the power goes out, there's an almighty mess and a heck of waste of food in the making. Besides, it's damned hard to take a freezer camping :)

    M
     
  3. Goatboy

    Goatboy Full Member

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    As a kid about the only tinned meat we ever ate was tinned ham in my mums version of risotto. And that was the most adventurous thing she cooked. But it was "exotic" and we lapped it up. Didn't eat a huge amount of meat. A chicken was a real treat and despite being four of us it would do a few meals plus soupage. Mince, peas, chappit neeps and tatties was heaven and we always looked forward to that day of the week as the menu was on a rotation.
    It was when I left home that I had my first taste of corned beef; my mother wouldn't touch it after being ill with it as a kid. Now a corned beef sarnie is a bit of a treat for me.
    One of the worst tinned things I ever had was when I was seeing a lass down in Norfolk. I'd travelled down and she had a "treat" for me. Tinned haggis. :eek: Now I love the chieften or the puddin' race but this stuff gave me the boak. Still I had to eat it and smile as she'd gone out looking for it. Young love!
    On the tinned bread I've had the "Pillsbury Doughboy" stuff in the cardboard type tubes. A mate brought it camping one time. Was okay but I find certain types of bread easier and almost as quick to make from scratch. Some stuff like German black bread keeps (well doesn't get much harder than it is) well. Flat and pan fried breads are very quick to do.

    Sent via smoke-signal from a woodland in Scotland.
     
  4. mick91

    mick91 Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    It was the texture I couldn't get my head around. But then I did eat it cold from the can. With you on the tinned ham and corned beef being essential staples though, easy pie or buttie filling. We often eat fresh from the field now but there's only so much woodpigeon and rabbit someone can eat. Although duck season is fast approaching and she does make a fine comfie duck!
     
  5. rik_uk3

    rik_uk3 Banned

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    Back in the 70's I read a book by Dougal Haston in which he described having a canned whole chicken as his new years eve meal. Safeway's back then sold them, Epicure brand IIRC so I tried one. Had it on a winter camp in Snowdonia served up with canned spuds and veg; not too bad at all to be honest...I'd not eat one at home but I'd certainly take one on a camp (to eat, not just go camping with).
    [h=1][/h]
     
  6. GGTBod

    GGTBod Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    For a second there Rik i had you pictured with your 'Wilson' chicken in a can in the wilderness
     
  7. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    We were evicted from our hole in the ground. We had to go and live in a lake.
     
  8. GGTBod

    GGTBod Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Kudos BR you beat me to it. Couldn't resist any longer from quoting the legends with all this fancy risotto talk

    FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:Aye, very passable, that, very passable bit of risotto.

    SECOND YORKSHIREMAN:Nothing like a good glass of Château de Chasselas, eh, Josiah?

    THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:You're right there, Obadiah.

    FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:Who'd have thought thirty year ago we'd all be sittin' here drinking Château de Chasselas, eh?

    FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:In them days we was glad to have the price of a cup o' tea.

    SECOND YORKSHIREMAN:A cup o' cold tea.

    FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:Without milk or sugar.

    THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:Or tea.FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:In a cracked cup, an' all.

    FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:Oh, we never had a cup. We used to have to drink out of a rolled up newspaper.

    SECOND YORKSHIREMAN:The best we could manage was to suck on a piece of damp cloth.

    THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:But you know, we were happy in those days, though we were poor.

    FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:Because we were poor. My old Dad used to say to me, "Money doesn't buy you happiness, son".

    FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:Aye, 'e was right.

    FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:Aye, 'e was.

    FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:I was happier then and I had nothin'. We used to live in this tiny old house with great big holes in the roof.

    SECOND YORKSHIREMAN:House! You were lucky to live in a house! We used to live in one room, all twenty-six of us, no furniture, 'alf the floor was missing, and we were all 'uddled together in one corner for fear of falling.

    THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:Eh, you were lucky to have a room! We used to have to live in t' corridor!

    FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:Oh, we used to dream of livin' in a corridor! Would ha' been a palace to us. We used to live in an old water tank on a rubbish tip. We got woke up every morning by having a load of rotting fish dumped all over us! House? Huh.

    FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:Well, when I say 'house' it was only a hole in the ground covered by a sheet of tarpaulin, but it was a house to us.

    SECOND YORKSHIREMAN:We were evicted from our 'ole in the ground; we 'ad to go and live in a lake.

    THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:You were lucky to have a lake! There were a hundred and fifty of us living in t' shoebox in t' middle o' road.

    FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:Cardboard box?

    THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:Aye.

    FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:You were lucky. We lived for three months in a paper bag in a septic tank. We used to have to get up at six in the morning, clean the paper bag, eat a crust of stale bread, go to work down t' mill, fourteen hours a day, week-in week-out, for sixpence a week, and when we got home our Dad would thrash us to sleep wi' his belt.

    SECOND YORKSHIREMAN:Luxury. We used to have to get out of the lake at six o'clock in the morning, clean the lake, eat a handful of 'ot gravel, work twenty hour day at mill for tuppence a month, come home, and Dad would thrash us to sleep with a broken bottle, if we were lucky!

    THIRD YORKSHIREMAN:Well, of course, we had it tough. We used to 'ave to get up out of shoebox at twelve o'clock at night and lick road clean wit' tongue. We had two bits of cold gravel, worked twenty-four hours a day at mill for sixpence every four years, and when we got home our Dad would slice us in two wit' bread knife.

    FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN:Right. I had to get up in the morning at ten o'clock at night half an hour before I went to bed, drink a cup of sulphuric acid, work twenty-nine hours a day down mill, and pay mill owner for permission to come to work, and when we got home, our Dad and our mother would kill us and dance about on our graves singing Hallelujah.

    FIRST YORKSHIREMAN:And you try and tell the young people of today that ..... they won't believe you.ALL:They won't!
     
    #28 GGTBod, Jul 30, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2015
  9. rik_uk3

    rik_uk3 Banned

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  10. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    I think that Colin means that that was literally the only canned meat he ever ate as a child. Everything else was fresh from the butcher.

    Tinned veggie haggis is pretty good though :)

    M
     
  11. British Red

    British Red M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Cultural reference to men reminiscing Mary ;)
     
  12. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    Aaah :)

    Sorry :eek:

    M
     
  13. Goatboy

    Goatboy Full Member

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    You're both right. :D
    Though a fair portion was shot too. But meat was still a treat.

    Sent via smoke-signal from a woodland in Scotland.
     
  14. OldJimbo

    OldJimbo Settler

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    I absolutely have to get your recipe for vegetarian haggis if you have one! Finally I might have an advantage on my vegetarian grand-daughter, if veggie haggis really is possible. It's been very difficult to surprise her in the past...
     
  15. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I've never seen it in a store, and having never heard of it until this thread, I've never looked online. Certainly never met anybody who's eaten any.

    That said, the bread I tried from the Canadian IMP (Individual Meal Pack---or a ration) is a single serving size white bread wrapped and sealed in what's essentially a soft can.
     
  16. Fraxinus

    Fraxinus Settler

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    Love how this thread has meandered ;) I thought the old canned chicken would pop up but thought it would be Rik that would do so :lmao:
    Ta for the source info, I think I shall give it a miss due to postage costs though.
    I am a confident bread maker, actually enjoy the process, so was only interested in it as a store cupboard item for when we have disrupted supplies.

    As a kid we had a lot of canned meat products but we used to have a lot of rabbit that Dad got off a mate in the pub or fish that he caught and I remember him setting to after eating Sunday lunch (slightly dried up from keeping warm in oven) after getting back from the pub (sloshed!) and prepping a bag full of rabbits.
    With nine kids to feed he worked hard and played hard and we never went hungry. :)

    Rob.
     
  17. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    http://www.macsween.co.uk/products/delicious-every-day-vegetarian/
    http://www.hendersonsofedinburgh.co.uk/recipes/vegetarian-haggis.php
    that recipe's pretty good, though I'm fussy about the garam masala and usually just stick to some allspice, loads of fresh ground pepper and salt, and I add a couple of tablespoonsful of peanut butter instead of margarine. I generally mince the mushrooms and sauté them down in a very lightly oiled pan and then put the lid on and the heat draws the jus and I use that instead of adding tamari.
    If you get it all cooked down then pack it into an ashet and roast it a bit in the oven, it's pretty good :D It's not supposed to be crispy though, so a casserole dish with a lid works well. If you do it in the ashet then cover it with pastry (cheese flaky's good ) then it makes a good haggis pie which is a lot better than most of the commercial fakesteak vegetarian options out there, or mashed spuds for a Shepherd's pie.

    I've just had a look on the North American Amazon site for you, and by heavens they know how to charge, don't they ? :yikes:
    Tinned haggis and vegetarian haggis is under a couple of pounds here. I know folks who go camping and take both types so they have meat and veg sorted :)




    I remember meat being well used. Nothing was wasted. If it couldn't be eaten easily it was boiled down to jelly or stock. I don't ever remember anyone in the family eating tripe, but we did make and eat haggis, and Grandpa really did like a singed sheeps heid…
    http://archive.org/stream/mrsbeetonshouse00beetuoft#page/610/mode/2up
    which he ate with black pepper.
    My Father shot rabbits, etc., until the mixie really started in this area, and not long after he gave up his rifles.
    Tinned meat was kept for camping or for just-in-case. No one had a freezer big enough to store meat, though some of the big sandstone houses still had game rooms. The only other way I knew of to preserve meat was as 'ham', and we made beef ham here too, not just pig ham, iimmc., or as potted meat, like potted hough. The big marmeet on Granny's cooker simmered everything down to stock. Mum had a pressure cooker instead :)
    I was never fond of meat, of any kind. I mind sitting at the table and not allowed to leave until I'd finished my dinner, and I just couldn't eat the meat. I don't know how many times I sat there for hours, with the meat still on my plate, until bedtime, and my Dad angry that I wouldn't eat it and be done. I just couldn't, and it never got any better. I'll prep it, cook it, serve it, but it's not food for me, and I have never missed it.

    M
     
  18. rik_uk3

    rik_uk3 Banned

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    There is a lot of strange food about

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  19. 21st century pict

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    I've not tried the tinned version , but the "regular" veggie haggis is ace.

    Ramirez: Haggis? What is haggis?
    Connor MacLeod :A sheep's stomach, stuffed with meat and barley.
    Ramerez: And what do you do with it?
    Conner MacLeod: You eat it.
    Ramerez: How revolting!


    Quick Joke
    What's the difference between peas and bogies ?
    You cant get kids to eat peas.
     
    #39 21st century pict, Jul 31, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2015
  20. GGTBod

    GGTBod Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Some gourmet treats from around the world

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     

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