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Bedroll. How to carry the rest? Request for information.

Discussion in 'Bushcraft and survival skills' started by Ascobis, Apr 3, 2019.

  1. Ascobis

    Ascobis Forager

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    Greetings,
    Over the winter I've made biltong (and got it right on the third batch) and hardtack (got that right the first time). Those gave me the itch for a primitive camping trip.

    I have a bedroll of 9' x 12' painter's canvas dropcloth plus two extremely nice wool blankets.

    Question: Where to hang the pot?
    I can't roll my roll tight enough to fit in a 4L pot. That would be ideal; pot covering the up-end of the roll as carried.

    I've seen some utubs where an axe is stuck in the end of the bedroll. Socks, etc., get rolled in.

    Where did bedroll-toting persons carry the rest of their stuff? Fire kit goes on a necklace. Knife goes on a necklace or the belt. Water might be in a leather bottle on a cross-chest strap (but that method depends on having water everywhere, as one might find in a rainy, damp, dismal environment. [Y'all's Scotland or Midlands?] [...and where does one stash one's purification kit for modern reality?])

    Recently watched a utub series by a fellow who tried out a great kilt in various configurations. In my neck of the woods, prancing about sky-clad whilst one's great kilt has been re-purposed as one's tent leads to certain civil infractions and a lifetime sexual offender tag. So much for that approach. Carry the bedroll while fully clothed.

    A surplus "bread bag" is possibly a carrier for the little stuff. Has anyone done this in a primitive mode?
     
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  2. crosslandkelly

    crosslandkelly A somewhat settled

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  3. bearbait

    bearbait Full Member

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    Book 9 of Richard Graves' Bushcraft may help. He talks about the traditional Aussie Swag.

    Scroll down the page a way to find it.

    (The book used to be available on BCUK but the PDF link seems broken to me.)
     
  4. Le Loup

    Le Loup Nomad

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    Many many years ago when I started out in 18th century living history & historical camping I tried many methods that were being toted as "authentic' methods. With experience & the help of experimental archaeology I finally found the best authentic carrying method for me. So my pack consists of a period style knapsack with the blanket tied to the straps & my oilcloth secured under the flap closure. A spare pair of moccasins are tied to the blanket roll, & the kettle goes inside the knapsack.
    [​IMG]

    My flint, steel & tinderbox is kept in my greased leather fire bag & carried in my belt pouch along with my angling tackle.
    [​IMG]
    My tomahawk is secured under my waist belt at my back, & my hunting knife under the belt at my front. If I have heavier cutting work to do I secure a half-axe under the ties on my blanket roll.
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    The blanket you can see thrown over the pack at my shoulders is my half-blanket which is worn cape fashion. If I get too warm on the trail I simply pass it over my head to lay across my blanket roll as you see here.


    [​IMG]
    I found several problems using my bedroll as a pack. 1) if I wanted anything from the pack I had to take it off & unroll it. 2) if it rained or snowed on the trail I would have to again take off the bedroll & untie it to get at my oilcloth to keep myself dry. 3) at the camp site equipment in the bedroll was no longer secured & kept together. 4) I found that this type of pack did not carry well, it moved about too much. At one time negotiating a goat trail down a cliff the pack caught on an obstruction & moved. Fortunately I was close to the bottom of the trail & the drop was not too excessive, but it literally toppled me off the trail!
    I hope this reply is of some help or interest Ascobis, if you have any questions just ask.
    Regards, Keith.
    An ex West Sussex lad.
     
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  5. Ascobis

    Ascobis Forager

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    Skwee. Swoon. Dude, you are one of my heroes. I have wondered since before I subscribed to your yt channel, why the heck a bloke in NSW is doing North American history?

    Best wishes.
     
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  6. Le Loup

    Le Loup Nomad

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    Thank you Ascobis, much appreciated.
    I prefer the North American history over Australian because it is an earlier period, & because it is not as much fun doing Australian living history. Plus as a kid in England the North American woodsman was my hero, the woodsrunner's lifestyle was exciting & very interesting. Even back then I had a toy flintlock pistol plus rubber knife & tomahawk & a coonskin hat. All I ever wanted to be was a woodsrunner. Now I have my own forest, that is what I do ;)
    Regards, Keith.
     
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  7. sunndog

    sunndog Full Member

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    Mate that is one serious outfit I love it....esp the hat!
     
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  8. Corso

    Corso Full Member

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  9. Le Loup

    Le Loup Nomad

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    [​IMG]
    Keith.
     
  10. Le Loup

    Le Loup Nomad

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    No difference Corso, I only camp out in winter these days, so I am occasionally in the rain or in the snow. The reason I don't roll my blanket in the oilcloth when journeying on land is so that I have quick access to it if it starts to rain when I am on the trail. I simply cover myself & my gear still on my back & sit it out somewhere.
    I enjoy camping in the rain & snow, it gives me a real feeling of self reliance & self sufficiency. Very satisfying.
    Regards, Keith.
     
  11. Ascobis

    Ascobis Forager

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    I'm reading _While the Billy Boils_ by Harry Lawson. It has the same flavor as Rawhide Rawlins, who lived and wrote in my patch.

    The Graves' books are superb. How many lives did they save?
    http://gen.lib.rus.ec has a bad copy.

    (Thought just occurred: what training did that one Japanese soldier have? Is the generic bushcraft library missing an Imperial Japanese Army jungle survival book?)
     

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