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Beans and more beans and tuna

Discussion in 'Lovely Grub' started by Tengu, Nov 21, 2019.

  1. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I was gonna say ends and pieces are so.d here as well. Those make very cheap “cooking” bacon. I rather like the fat. To be honest, that’s really the whole reason bacon or pork is added to recipes anyway; to give it fat. My grandmother never added bacon itself but instead kept the bacon grease for recipes (note to others: Southern vegetables aren’t for vegetarians) I also add onions when cooking beans (or almost anything else) from raw. Usually as part of the “trinity.” (onions, bell pepper, and celery)
     
  2. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    That's the stuff. It's surprisingly good for making soup, though you need to skim the fat off it. If you like bacon fat though, that makes a decent job of frying egg, making skirlie, or as the fat in savoury bakes like cheese scones.

    @santaman2000
    That 'trinity' isn't really a European thing, we make a mirepoix of carrot, onion and celery though or a soffritto (much the same as a mirepoix but sometimes a bit like RV's when it's made of onion, garlic and tomato), lot of folks find peppers, well the skins, gives them heartburn and it hard to digest.

    M
     
  3. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Beans, onion and garlic = musical fruit. How did you know?
    Hope none are "atomic." Big bang and a lot of fall-out.

    I never take all the fat out of cottage bacon = impossibility.
    I'll take 1/3 of it, particularly the pure white lumps.
    Good stuff to feed the Ravens at 20 below.
     
  4. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I just came home from one of the supermarkets, and yes, baked beans in tomato sauce is indeed also made in North America.
    Van Camp have several versions, plus I saw several other brands, some very fancy and organic!

    Once I run out of the Branson’s I might try the Van Camp.


    We have visitors from Norway, son’s future family, and mum is a vegetarian, so tomorrow I am going to cook a vegetarian goulash, (substituting the beef with Quorn) an experimental version, and tomorrow an experimental version of the Cuban dish Chickpeas with chorizo, but replacing the chorizo with tofu I will marinate in wood vinegar.
     
  5. Tengu

    Tengu Full Member

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    Quorn is good. My dad eats some as a partial substitute for red meat. (something he eats little of these days)

    He has a delicate stomach so soya...well, lets not say what soya does to him.

    But quorn harms him not
     
  6. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I love the taste of the unflavoured one.
    The chicken ( and beef) flavoured ones are a travesty.

    I like the flavour of tofu too. More so since I quit the Marlboroughs!

    Did the crafty Americans not develop a bean that does not produce so much flatulence?
    Less oligosacckarides?
     
  7. Woody girl

    Woody girl Full Member

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    Yes soya can have an unfortunate effect on ones digestive system !
    Many years ago I was given a bag of beef flavour style soya chunks.
    Eagerly made a stew with lots of barley and beans plus the soya chunks.
    ........ I had social problems !
    The aroma surrounding me was not a gucci fragrance! :( :(
    The chunks were gifted on!
     
    #67 Woody girl, Nov 23, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2019
  8. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Yeah, the French have mirepoix, the Spanish and Portuguese have soffrito (the exact composition of soffrito varies between different Hispanic nations/regions of the world.

    I remember Van Camps! Haven’t eaten that one since I was a kid. I never read the ingredients on that one but I remember we treated it the way RV described (use it as an ingredient and add sugar/honey/molasses or whatever sweetener and a bit of liquid.

    You realize real goulash doesn’t have tomatoes either. Rather lots of paprika.

    Not that I’m aware of.
     
  9. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Ah. Now we are very close to the real "Trinity" of the Neolithic peoples across the Great Plains of North America:
    Corn, squash and beans, grown in enormous family gardens. Enough for a winter with a good crop.
    Can you find a reprint of "Bird Woman's Garden?" The real deal, digging sticks and all.
    I can still remember being taught how and when to grow corn/maize.

    In most of the rest of the world, I can believe that the Stone Age ended a few thousand years ago.
    Not true in North America. Not true, less than a block from my house right now.

    Beans don't give me gas like they once did. I don't miss it at all.
    I could play the first 4 bars of our National Anthem.
     
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  10. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    A lot of truth in that. But that combo was more often called “the three sisters” than “the trinity.” And less about coming together but rather about growing together.
     
  11. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    Got me going. Tonight is Bush's Original beans with added onion, garlic powder, Worster and half a dozen dried Roma tomato slices.
    Bunch of dry toast with Cheese Whiz as a landing pad. Salad.

    In Bird Woman's Garden, there are illustrated descriptions of how she/they stored the crops to prevent rodent damage.
    I forget what the book says for the original interviews but they are really old. I have read the entire reprint.
    Cool and dry, I can keep pumpkins and squash (Cucurbitaceae) for 6 months or so.
    Excellent lesson for anyone interested in ethnobotany.

    What were the Neolithic crops in the UK?
     
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  12. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    Barley, oats, wheat, celtic bean, peas, flax and masses of hazelnuts.
     
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  13. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    What is a Celtic bean?

    I always wondered if crab apples and those small wild plums were a part of Neo cuisine. Maybe even consciously planted/ farmed?

    Abundant.

    Cheez Whiz ? You desecrate your mouth with that?
    :)
     
    #73 Janne, Nov 24, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2019
  14. Toddy

    Toddy Mod
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    It's a dark butter bean kind of bean. Very variable apparently, bit like apples and plums in that folks cultivated their own varieties.
    Grows well in brackish soil, so easily worked esturine soils were very exploitable, and fertile.

    M
     
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  15. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

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    Cheez Whiz, I love that particular abomination of cheese. Is it still available in the pressurised can? :D

     
  16. santaman2000

    santaman2000 M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Yes! Yes it is!
     
  17. Nice65

    Nice65 Full Member

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    I feel dirty just thinking about it. :D
     
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  18. Robson Valley

    Robson Valley Full Member

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    CheezWhiz is probably a petroleum byproduct from Canada's Athabasca tar sands deposit.
    We see no pressure cans but 4 or 5 ? different jar sizes. Works very well to waterproof the toast.

    I. Don't. Care.

    My baked bean supper was great. 4 smallish slices of toast and CW, the can of adulterated Bush's beans and my face in my plate.
    Can of local dark ale (Swamp Donkey) to wash it down. Half a dozen Fudgeoo cookies for dessert.
    Remarkably little gas pressure blow-back during the night.

    I'll never cook beans from scratch on a camping trip for the fuel cost and monitoring.
    Cans. Burn the cans in the camp fire. Food smells will bring in the bears at night.
    If it's a sow with cubs, you have no end of new problems to cope with. Sleep with a loaded 12 ga.
    You burn all your food trash. Clean and cold, back to town in my home garbage.
     
  19. Tengu

    Tengu Full Member

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    Dad gave me some money and I bought some food.

    I now have potatoes!

    And cheese!

    The beans and tuna can wait for a fancing it day!

    Im having baked potatoes for supper!

    And I have bacon pieces, I get mine from the butchers; as good as their sliced bacon.

    I can have a handful for 40p.

    Some is embarrasingly big lumps of fat, but others is big chunks, cook as gammon or cube for a kebab.
     
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  20. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    We did buy the pressurised Cheeze Whiz once.
    I do not think it is made from the Canadian Tar Sands, but from the used Engine oil from the machines used to mine the sands!

    I think it is chemically the same as that Kraft product which is not allowed to be called cheese in Europe?
    Those orange-yellow plastic clad slices?
     

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