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Advice request for cordless tools for around the place.

Discussion in 'The Homestead' started by Badger74, May 30, 2017.

  1. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    I doubt the Lidl and Aldi tools are Made in Germany. More likely made by a German company in a factory in China. Like the cheap line of Bosch.
     
  2. Old Bones

    Old Bones Settler

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    The respected German brand Metabo http://www.toolstop.co.uk/metabo-m207 seems to be involved with Lidl - the colours are exactly the same, although evidently the Lidl ones are at the cheaper end, and Einhell. My Aldi saw seems to be made assembled in Germany, and apparently their tools are made by various manufacturers, including Einhell (again!).

    It may be they are assembled in China, but for the money, they are good value.
     
  3. Janne

    Janne M.A.B (Mad About Bushcraft)

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    Sorry, I was wrong they are made in Malaysia.
     
  4. Badger74

    Badger74 Full Member

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    Thanks for all the comments, much food for thought. This will have to wait now as I need an electric fence for the goat, as plan A wasn't suitable.
     
  5. MartiniDave

    MartiniDave Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Also it's worth remembering that the cutting tools need to be in good condition and correctly ground, especially with stuff like stainless steel, and decent cutting lubricants will make it easier too.
     
  6. Tonyuk

    Tonyuk Settler

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    I've always used bosch for cordless drills. I bought one of their new-ish Li-Ion drills from screwfix and its been very good so far. I have a proper corded sds drill for going into concrete, worth its weight in gold when there's proper work to do.

    The drill is this one im sure;

    http://www.screwfix.com/p/bosch-gsb-18-2-li-plus-18v-4-0ah-li-ion-cordless-combi-drill/7434k

    If your in screwfix pick this set up also;

    http://www.screwfix.com/p/titan-all-purpose-screwdriver-bit-set-100-pieces/8450h

    £10 for pretty much every screw bit your going to come across in good steel. I haven't come across anything that needed something that wasn't included in that set.

    Tonyuk
     
  7. EdS

    EdS Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Bosch 36v

    All the power you need and robust. Standard caving drill these days
     
  8. SGL70

    SGL70 Full Member

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    If I were to drill a hole in the wall once every 3 months, I'd go with the cheapest. As my chequered past contains me being a carpenter, I have Makita gear which I do like...but that is a different story
     
  9. Leshy

    Leshy Full Member

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    SGL70 is spot on there ..
    How much do you use it?

    Buy cheap you buy twice though, there's no getting away from that one.

    And as a chippie I'd also recommend Makita or Bosch Pro series (blue kit) .
     
  10. ValeTudoGuy

    ValeTudoGuy Nomad

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    Buy cheap... Buy twice, I agree. But for infrequent light DIY use the Aldi and Lidl 3 year guarantee is pretty decent.
     
  11. demographic

    demographic Bushcrafter (boy, I've got a lot to say!)

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    Pretty much every manufacturer (apart from Festool, Hilti and maybe Metabo) does a cheap DIY range that as a tradesman I avoid.
    Usually with very low amp hour batteries and drills with a chuck than only takes a 10mm chuck.


    If the chuck only opens to ten mil, its not upto much.
     
    #31 demographic, May 31, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2017
  12. Badger74

    Badger74 Full Member

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    As an update, I've just ordered a Makita DHP459SFE 18V 3.0Ah Li-Ion LXT Brushless Cordless Combi Drill from Scewfix @ £169. I had earmarked a DeWalt at £150 from Screwfix, but that offer ended last night and its back to £200.

    It had better last me many years as we are now on rice and beans for a while.
     
  13. Old Bones

    Old Bones Settler

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    I noticed that one, and it looks like a good buy. It should last, and do the job that you want.

    I know what you mean about seemingly spending a lot on a drill (my wife did ask how much I'd paid for mine), but sometimes its worth it. And beans and rice are at least healthy!
     
  14. petrochemicals

    petrochemicals Full Member

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    If you are serious anout the ammount of masonary drilling you have to do, buy a corded sds chuck drill with pneumatic hammer,make sure it has a stationary setting for chiseling too, they are a lot better and a lot more versatile. That is unless you have 500 quid to buy a cordless sds!
     
  15. Badger74

    Badger74 Full Member

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    It's just for general drilling in all sorts around my place as well as screwing when I need to build stuff. I have no external plugs hence cordless.

    Sent from my Hudl 2 using Tapatalk
     
  16. petrochemicals

    petrochemicals Full Member

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    Well in that case a cordless should do for the odd rawl plug. I would not want to besmirch (or reccomend) any manufacturer on the basis of single tool experience. Sure helps even if you have sockets, when putting in an odd screw.

    As others have said your pro end bosch, makita and dewalt are for sustained long term use, these will set you back 150ish, but it is a cheap 150. I do not believe the cheaper end of these manufacturers is any better than any other manufacturer.

    Have a look at the chucks on them as some of the chucks are crap for quick change of drills, the jaws do not seem to easily locate the stem. The higher the voltage the better in batteries for the power in the drill. Do not expect too much from a percussion hammer, it will drain the battery quick. Obviously lithium is the end to go for. also get one with a bigg capacity battery for more power.

    In the budget end, Worx brand tools are from a Chinese manufacturer that started making the rebadgable tools for everyone, a huge company with a lot of experience. And titan from screwfix I find to be good too, although made by worx probably. Both seem to have a good reputation.

    The disclaimer is that all tool company's come with faults, real dumb ones too, that's what the makitas on display are in wicks, tools that are faulty out of the box, they cut the cord off them and display them. I recommend buying it and giving it a good run to make sure it doesn't melt or isn't crooked. The ammount of tools that go faulty or are faulty mean I'll never buy second hand again as the guarantee is invalid.
     
  17. Alreetmiowdmuka

    Alreetmiowdmuka Full Member

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    Good choice going with makita.i'm a joiner and all my tools are makita 18v cordless now I even have the coffee maker.makitas range is far more vast than any other makes on the market and now you own some batteries it will allow you too buy other tools as bare units cutting costs massively.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  18. underground

    underground Full Member

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    My Dewalt 18v SDS machine has been dragged miles in caves and operated in all sorts of horrendous conditions and not missed a beat.
     
  19. Old Bones

    Old Bones Settler

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    I'm curious, since I own a 453, and the OP has just bought a 459 - are they reasonable value for money? I found this explaination of the different series https://www.its.co.uk/blog/buying-guides/what-makita-drill-to-buy-2014/ - my 453 is fine for 'light' work (it depends what you mean by light), but what do you use? I assume something a bit more powerful.

    To be fair, my wife raised her eyebrows at £150, so can I ask what you use, and for most people, is it worth paying the extra?
    BTW - I didn't know a Makita coffee maker even existed! I dont need one, but they look great!
     
  20. Alreetmiowdmuka

    Alreetmiowdmuka Full Member

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    Same stuff makita don't really do a cordless diy range.i have seen both those drills in regular use on building sites.the op's new drill has a brushless motor which allows for more power to be obtained from the battery.brushless is the new thing and all cordless tools will be eventually.what both of you have are combi drills which basically do a bit of everything light masonry raw plugs etc too screwing.i have tools more specific to a task I use an impact driver for screwing and an sds drill for masonry work all cordless and from the 18v range.some of the larger tools such as my compound mitre saw run off two batteries brushless giving 36 v of power a friend of my has the chainsaw they also do a lawn mower.its the batteries that cost and are expensive too replace so look after them.the batteries themselves have a range of power outputs themselves and have an ah rating the higher the ah the more power.i have 2 2ah 5 4ah and 2 5ah and these power everything I don't take an extension lead too work anymore unless specifically needed.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     

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